I Wanna Be a Trainer :)
 
 

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I Wanna Be a Trainer :)

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  • Wanna be a horse trainer
  • I wanna be a trainer for university

 
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    03-16-2010, 08:24 PM
  #1
Yearling
I Wanna Be a Trainer :)

I don't know if anyone remembers these posts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveTheSaddlebreds    
I wanna work with horses for a living. I already work 9-10hrs a day at the barn I ride at, I give lessons occasionally at another barn, I've trained three horses, and have 12 years of riding experience. I can also ride almost every type of riding you can think of. I'd like to do a sort of training internship and work at a stable with horses and learn as much as possible about training. I'm already pretty good, but I don't have any training. I've watched shows like Parelli, Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, and Denis Ries. I've also watched my trainer and her son work with horses and I listen very closely to what they say and do. But, still, I have no 'formal' training. I'd like to get an idea of what would be expected of me if I were looking for a job and a trainer willing to work with me. Like what kind of horses I've worked with, what kind of work have I done, etc etc. Sooo, lets pretend I'm applying for this job of sorts and you guys are my boss(es). Ask me all the questions you'd ask someone who was going to be around your horses. I'll answer them honestly and to the best of my ability. I'm really trying to see how qualified I am and what I need to work on. Thanks ahead of time! :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveTheSaddlebreds    
I've been riding for 12 years, I've trained 3 horses, two with help and one by myself. I also own a mare who, when I bought her, was a green 4yo that bucked a lot and she is now perfect. I can ride any discipline, but I specialize in English (any form of jumping or u/s), dressage, saddleseat and western. I'm also good at driving, and a ok at sidesaddle - but not great. So far, I have 'volunteered' at a barn where I've given lessons, helped give lessons, was a camp counselor twice and I've worked and trained their horses. I'm experienced with green, problemed, and hot horses. I've worked Off track and racing thoroughbreds, worked with hot arabians and saddlebreds, and I've also worked with abused horses. I've given shots before, helped medicate (eyes, wounds etc) I've ultrasounded a horse a few times (eck), and I've assisted in surgery.. sort of. Lol I have a very good history with working with horses and I was wondering about a trainer internship. What kind of jobs and lessons could I get? Who would hire me? When could I start training? Etc etc.
Ok, so I've come to a possible decision to just get my GED and work at a barn to pay for rent and work with a trainer. I wanna get serious. I've gotten so much better than those two top posts and I am so eager to get even better. I wanna be proffessional, I want to do this for the rest of my life. There is absolutely NOTHING as important to me as horses. I have a few vids of me (not my best, but oh well) and the first three are from a three month period where I didnt ride, so... yea.




A horse I trained:






And since I don't have vids of Harley, Here's pics:
(Harley is the 4yo pony I trained all by myself, with NO help, and he is now a successful trail/lesson/camp pony - no vices)





















And I'm 16 now. Is that too young? Would no one bother to take notice of me? Or take me seriously? My friend says I should go through school cause no one will take me at 16. But I think if someone thinks I'm serious enough, I might have a chance.

Thanks for reading this :)
     
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    03-16-2010, 08:54 PM
  #2
Yearling
I think anyone who is serious, such as yourself, should go for it. You seem extremely serious about this. A little advice though, either way, you should go to school for it, get your education and further knowledge yourself because horse training is/can be difficult. I think you are on the right track here and should pursue it and all other things you wish to pursue. I'm still thinking about becoming a professional trainer myself, after I finish nursing school that is. I'm hoping Riosdad or Kevinshorses will see this and give you some advice, they are the people you need to listen too, as well as many others, but rio and kevin are amazing trainers here!
     
    03-16-2010, 08:56 PM
  #3
Yearling
Get your education first. You may not like it now, but later you will cherish the memories you make in the last year or two of high school. You can probably go into a training program right after you graduate. I can't remember his name right now, but I know of a trainer in VA that basically trains you to train. I have seen him at a couple of horse expos, and he's great with the horses. Not to mention that with the experience you already have, you'd probably have a leg up on some of the other people that attend.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:13 PM
  #4
Yearling
It is about being exposed to as many horses as you can and finding the specialty that you like,are good at,and can earn enough to live on.

The spectrum is so broad and runs from leading a dude string in the Rocky Mountains to starting colts for a big named trainer.
Working a a show barn to hanging your shingle out to help fix problem horses.
Lead training bays or cooling out track horses.

Seek out people that help you and leave the downers behind.

Stay in school as long as you can stand it and don't burn any bridges.
People will always respect your education,but your skill can get you noticed also.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:14 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlicata    
Get your education first. You may not like it now, but later you will cherish the memories you make in the last year or two of high school. You can probably go into a training program right after you graduate. I can't remember his name right now, but I know of a trainer in VA that basically trains you to train. I have seen him at a couple of horse expos, and he's great with the horses. Not to mention that with the experience you already have, you'd probably have a leg up on some of the other people that attend.
Haha you from spotsy? I recently moved from orange, my horse actually still lives their while I look for a place up in maryland... Ever heard of paradocs farm? That's where she is...

(hehe I visited over the weekend cause my friend had a show at hazelwild)

If you remember his name, please tell me!!
     
    03-16-2010, 09:15 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Being a trainer can be a very fulfilling job! I've been training professionally for several years now and I absolutely love it. I really hope you get to where you want to be!

I'm not trying to put a damper on your plans, but I would highly recommend continuing on with at least high school and IMO college as well. 1) You say that all you want to do is work with horses, and I believe you. What you don't know is what your future will hold. What are you going to do if you get injured? How are you going to pay for things (you know, food and shelter for yourself) until you have enough clientele to make a living? EVERY responsible trainer needs a back up plan. 2) Being a trainer is a heck of a lot more then riding horses. You need a lot of skills that a good college degree can help you with, especially a business degree (management, marketing, accounting, finance, etc etc etc) IMO this is an area that a lot of trainers are severely lacking and suffering from. Consider it.

I know a lot of 16 y/os that are fantastic riders. And some older trainers that are terrible. But IMHO if I were looking for a trainer for my horse I would want someone older and more experienced. When you're applying for a job, you want to build up your resume as much as you can. Same as being a trainer, you need a heck of a lot of stuff on your 'resume' to prove that you are good. "I've trained 3 horses", "I've watched a lot of shows", and "I listen closely to my trainer" aren't enough for me personally. The big red flag is: "I'm pretty good but don't have any formal training". I would get formal training. Be a working student for a really good trainer. If I had a choice of someone who had no formal training and someone who I didn't know but worked under someone who did? I'd pick the latter. A good trainer can also help you find a job when you're ready. Also, if you can afford it, SHOW! Every ribbon and year end award is something to put on your 'resume' to prove to someone who doesn't know you that maybe you can ride.

Again, not trying to rain on your parade... sure, maybe you can get a horse or two into training right now... but in the long run I think you'll have a much MUCH more successful career if you hold on patiently to your goals, keep working on achieving them a little longer (take lessons, finish school) and then start up with a few more years under your belt.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:18 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marecare    
It is about being exposed to as many horses as you can and finding the specialty that you like,are good at,and can earn enough to live on.

The spectrum is so broad and runs from leading a dude string in the Rocky Mountains to starting colts for a big named trainer.
Working a a show barn to hanging your shingle out to help fix problem horses.
Lead training bays or cooling out track horses.

Seek out people that help you and leave the downers behind.

Stay in school as long as you can stand it and don't burn any bridges.
People will always respect your education,but your skill can get you noticed also.
Thanks that's great advice!

I've been trying to get exposed to as many different kinds of trainers and disciplines. I've done a lot of what you named (except the mountains and the big name trainer part) But I think I'd really like to specialize in jumping, but I'm very diverse and like to do a little of everything, like my trainer.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:25 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
Being a trainer can be a very fulfilling job! I've been training professionally for several years now and I absolutely love it. I really hope you get to where you want to be!

I'm not trying to put a damper on your plans, but I would highly recommend continuing on with at least high school and IMO college as well. 1) You say that all you want to do is work with horses, and I believe you. What you don't know is what your future will hold. What are you going to do if you get injured? How are you going to pay for things (you know, food and shelter for yourself) until you have enough clientele to make a living? EVERY responsible trainer needs a back up plan. 2) Being a trainer is a heck of a lot more then riding horses. You need a lot of skills that a good college degree can help you with, especially a business degree (management, marketing, accounting, finance, etc etc etc) IMO this is an area that a lot of trainers are severely lacking and suffering from. Consider it.

I know a lot of 16 y/os that are fantastic riders. And some older trainers that are terrible. But IMHO if I were looking for a trainer for my horse I would want someone older and more experienced. When you're applying for a job, you want to build up your resume as much as you can. Same as being a trainer, you need a heck of a lot of stuff on your 'resume' to prove that you are good. "I've trained 3 horses", "I've watched a lot of shows", and "I listen closely to my trainer" aren't enough for me personally. The big red flag is: "I'm pretty good but don't have any formal training". I would get formal training. Be a working student for a really good trainer. If I had a choice of someone who had no formal training and someone who I didn't know but worked under someone who did? I'd pick the latter. A good trainer can also help you find a job when you're ready. Also, if you can afford it, SHOW! Every ribbon and year end award is something to put on your 'resume' to prove to someone who doesn't know you that maybe you can ride.

Again, not trying to rain on your parade... sure, maybe you can get a horse or two into training right now... but in the long run I think you'll have a much MUCH more successful career if you hold on patiently to your goals, keep working on achieving them a little longer (take lessons, finish school) and then start up with a few more years under your belt.
I do have formal training, but I've never been employed... that's what I meant. Like I've had lessons for 12 years and helped my trainer with problemed horses and I've partially trained too many horses to count. I'm not looking for a job, I'm looking for an internship so I can learn and build a foundation towards becoming a trainer. I've worked with crazy wb and tb stallions, I've worked with foals, weanlings, and yearlings. I've had to lead a 2yo unbroke, untouched wb colt and handle him for a kuring and he was a nightmare, but my trainer said I handled it well. I've dealt with many similar situations as well. I also have had to work with crazy off track thoroughbreds, poorly trained and untrained horses, abused horses, crazy jumpers, and aggressive horses. The list goes on.

I totally understand where you're getting at! You're not raining on my parade, I would rather hear the hard truth than a sugar coated lie. This just makes me more determined to finish school and become the best trainer I can be.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:37 PM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveTheSaddlebreds    
Haha you from spotsy? I recently moved from orange, my horse actually still lives their while I look for a place up in maryland... Ever heard of paradocs farm? That's where she is...

(hehe I visited over the weekend cause my friend had a show at hazelwild)

If you remember his name, please tell me!!

Yep, I'm in Spotsy. Actually only about 10 mins from paradocs. Where I keep Rosie is right on the Orange County line. If you do trail riding, you'll have to pm me when you come down again. We could take a quick ride down to Lake Anna if nothing else. Ilovemyphillip is somewhere in Caroline County, maybe she could meet up with us too.

Also, what county are you in, in MD. I used to live in the Northeastern part. I may be able to help you find a barn.
     
    03-16-2010, 09:38 PM
  #10
Yearling
Oh, and the guys name is Kenny Harlow... www.kennyharlow.com
     

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