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I want to learn to ride English....

This is a discussion on I want to learn to ride English.... within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        10-05-2007, 09:25 PM
      #21
    Foal
    It takes lots and lots of practice to get the strides right to the jump. My daughter has been jumping for years and she still has to work on that. Especially when she's on a new horse. Each horse is a little different. Just this week, her trainer had them all in a flat lesson going over two poles on the ground. At first she had them do it in four strides. Then they had to adjust their speed to make it work in three strides. Trying things like that should help you learn how to get your horse to where he needs to be for the jump. Also, if he's running at the jumps, half halt him several strides before the jump. Giving him his release over the jump is exactly what you want to do, so it sounds like you're doing the right thing there. If he speeds up after the jump, then half halt him again right after the jump.

    One last thing, definitely find a helmet somehow. I've heard too many horror stories. You only have one head and one brain, and it's important to protect them! ;)
         
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        10-05-2007, 09:39 PM
      #22
    Started
    THANKS!!!! I rode today and jumped a little bit. The jump was about a foot or maybe a little more. He was was TOO anxious and excited. I trotted him to the jump and about a three strides away he would start loping a jump. He jumps weird. It was kinda hard to lean and move with him. I think that might be because the jump was a little lower than usual. He did alright though. I want to start working with him in a running martingale. He has BEAUTIFUL head carraige when he's not all phsyco, you know? He picks head up and runs through the bit sometimes. And its hard to pull his head down for a proper stop...otherwise he didn't act out-of-shape at all. He acted like a naughty little racehorse...
         
        10-05-2007, 09:44 PM
      #23
    Trained
    Well that's good to hear. I ride my mare in a running martingale and it works a lot better control wise before and after a jump. I did this today when I was by my horse, with just her regular lead rope (like 6ft or so) I did a make shift lunge with a little straight bar (almost 6 inch) and I had her walk and then trot over it and she did very well.

    She hasn't jumped in a couple of months, and I wanted to take it easy with her, that's why it was so low, but tomorrow, I plan on making it higher and then riding her over it too.
         
        10-06-2007, 03:50 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    horse_luver4e I don't wear a helmet because they don't keep the sun off me very good, and after training all day my neck would be tired with that heavy thing on my head all day.
    I hate to be a butt about this but Flying B you can die from falling off if you don't have a helmet on. I mean it's your decision but I hate people who say they are too good for helmets, I've heard of a pro trainer that used to do reining and cutting and he went out one day without a helmet and fell and he sufferd from a concusion and when he woke up he was mentally ******ed. It was so sad. It can happen to anyone.
         
        10-06-2007, 03:54 PM
      #25
    Started
    I get what you mean! I don't think I am too good for a helmet...its just that I can't get one right now. And, I mean its scary just thinking about falling and breaking your neck or something!!! Whoa...
         
        10-06-2007, 04:05 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Horse_love4e, I heard of just as many people falling off with helmets and die, if it's my time I don't really care, I know where I'm going when I go. I'm safer on there backs then when I am on the ground with them I get kicked and bitten all the time, I was on one the other day and he bit me in my back and then I get on his back and he started bucking, and that was a lot less painful LOL. I was helping a friend worm one time and one of the mares mule kicked out at another horse and missed and hit me in my face, chipped two teeth and about put a hole in my cheek, and I finished worming the last two horses befor I went to get some ice.
    I am all for helmets, I just don't use one I know it's not the smartest thing but I feel fine on there backs.
         
        10-15-2007, 10:42 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Horsematch site

    In my opinion , the English saddle to some feels a lot more vulnerable. I'm afraid the word would be, because it doesn't give you the same sense of stability that the western does. You may try to test it to see how it goes . Get more response on horsematch dot come if you are interested .
         
        10-15-2007, 11:21 PM
      #28
    Started
    Right now I think I am just going to stick to Western. I love riding in rodeos!!! There is so much to do there! Plus, Boo has natural cow-sense. I like helping run steers with him at night when some people get together to rope. He is so big though. Last time he was steeping on the steers! I have ridden steers so many times with my best friend, Makenzi! We both love horses. SAdly enough, she is selling her little Appaloosa gelding. She needs a more experienced horse. He is only six I think but he is naughty. Very, very...anyways...thanks so much you guys!
         
        10-26-2007, 03:35 PM
      #29
    Foal
    One of the keys to feeling secure in an English saddle is using the correct stirrup length and leg position. There is a general rule to go by that works for most people regarding stirrup length ... when working on the flat, the bottom of the stirrup iron should hit right at your ankle bone when your leg hangs straight down. Then, for every foot high you are jumping, raise the stirrups up one full hole. For jumping position, you need to ride in lots of two-point and also balance in two-point with your arms straight out to the side. This will strength your lower leg and base of support so you don't lean on your hands. This will keep you from falling back in the saddle or grabbing your horse's mouth in the air.

    Check out any articles or books you can find by George Morris. He's probably the THE leading expert on classic equitation, and it will help you see the correct position you need to establish to jump most effectively and safely.
         
        04-08-2009, 11:14 AM
      #30
    Yearling
    I know a girl whose horse crushed her skull while she was wearing her helmet. Get a helmet before you try anything extreme!!!

    Running martingale sounds good.
    When you said he "jumps weird", he might just be overjumping out of excitement. As for the rushing, if the martingale doesn't work, just don't tense up when he does it. It's his first time!! He's just happy! :) He'll cool down after a while, once jumping is more regular to him. He'll just be like, "ugh. I've done this a million times. Can I eat now!?" xD
         

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