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Impatient Demanding Horse

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  • Horses that are impatient when it's feeding time

 
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    02-01-2011, 01:55 PM
  #11
Foal
Silly girl! She wants more horses to boss around. My mare likes to tell my cats what to do too. I know I am joking about it, but I have been really strict with her because she needs to know I am the boss of her. She can rule all the animals but not us!
     
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    02-01-2011, 02:09 PM
  #12
Foal
Haha yea I know & she tends to think she owns everything coming In & out of there.
     
    02-01-2011, 02:34 PM
  #13
Foal
Yeah so does April. My son was born three days after her and he owns everything in the house! I got nothin! Lol
     
    02-01-2011, 09:37 PM
  #14
Weanling
I've socialized quite a few horses and yes they can act the way you describe. I agree that you should carry a stick and not let them near you if they act crazy - bucking, charging etc. I find that actually approaching them after I feed and giving them a little rub and hug on the neck really helps - it's like mama horse feeding her foal. That's what I do and usually the behavoir stops completely. I'm not into tying horses up like that 'cause I wonder what they're really learning about me or anything at all.
     
    02-02-2011, 12:04 PM
  #15
Foal
Thanks for the reply, Her behavior w/ the bucking, pawing, throwing her head etc. isn't usually directed at me, Its towards the other horses or while she is just in the field standing for her food.

She behaved this way towards me when I first got her but I started carrying a whip & she stopped. I have had only 2 other episodes w/ her since I got the new horse that I actually felt unsafe and they were due to her gettin upset because the new horse was trying to go past her to get to the other horses food while Kya was eating. Due to both of them pushing my 28 yr. (Galaxy) old around I put her way down the fence line when feeding her and he (Doc) would try to past Kya to go run off Galaxy & she would just flip so I felt I was going to get caught in the crossfires because she constantly kicks out when upset.

I have now moved Galaxy closer to the others & made it where neither of the other horses have to go behind Kya while she's eating. I also stood guard over Galaxy w/ a whip a few times to keep the others away and now they don't try to push her off her food.

Kya is fine after she gets what she wants which tells me she thinks its her way or no way, & this is what I need to change. I have control over her & she does listen to me but she is very BOSSY with the other horses & will not even give them a millimeter before she flips out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLovedOne    
I've socialized quite a few horses and yes they can act the way you describe. I agree that you should carry a stick and not let them near you if they act crazy - bucking, charging etc. I find that actually approaching them after I feed and giving them a little rub and hug on the neck really helps - it's like mama horse feeding her foal. That's what I do and usually the behavoir stops completely. I'm not into tying horses up like that 'cause I wonder what they're really learning about me or anything at all.
     
    02-02-2011, 01:07 PM
  #16
Yearling
What a horse learns and guaranteed they do learn from being tied and left for a reasonable amount of time, as in the patience pole and from my generation called "Soap Opera" training is very effective in teaching the impatient and demanding horse the desired element of patience. The term "Soap Opera" training stems from my generation of the olden days of dedicated daytime continuating series of programs geared to those fans of said daytime programing and when only one income families could survive in days of yore.

The most important thing to keep in mind when having a horse tied to a patience pole or in "soap opera" training is to never leave with out being able to observe and watch the horse closely and have a very sharp rope cutting knife handy just in case the horse gets into trouble. This is another technique I have used and never had to use an emergency release of the horse.
     
    04-09-2011, 03:12 PM
  #17
Showing
For all you folks who have horses that kick down the stall, bang on the gate, etc at feeding time, there is a simple cure. As you approach the horse, the moment the banging starts, turn your back and slowly walk away about 20 feet. Keep your back to the horse and don't look at it. Now, stand there until the banging quits and it will because now the horse is confused. Banging always brought food. That is why the horse gets seemingly impatient. But now the food has walked away. When the banging stops, turn and slowly walk toward the horse again. It may start banging again so again turn and walk away. The horse, in it's confusion will start moving around in the stall or paddock. That's ok, it's not banging. That is the time to offer food. You must be consistent in this. The horse may try it again the next day but it will be more half-hearted. Even if only one bang or paw on the floor, walk away. You are retraining the horse's thinking that pawing or banging no longer works.
     

Tags
behavior, bucking, demanding, impatient, pawing

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