Introducing the bit?
   

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Introducing the bit?

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  • Problems when introducing a different bit to a horse
  • Lunging a horse with a surgincle

 
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    09-05-2009, 10:54 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Introducing the bit?

My dad bought a 5 y/o Paint gelding. He has never been around horses before (Dad) and the first time he tried to ride Pinto (The horse) He took off in a bucking fit. We had the old owner come up and try to ride him, and he did the same thing, and even reared over backwards.
(We think he was in pain because his feet were HORRID) *Told my dad not to ride, but who wants to listen to their 16 year old?*
So now I have been trying to re-train pinto, he has been wonderful. I gave him about a month to get used to me and get a connection, and practice with the saddle.

Now my question:
He has only had the bit in his mouth once. So how would I go about training him with a bit. I am thinking probably using a snaffle bit. But how can I get him to know the pressure of the bit and the pressure of the bosal/hackmore that he has been using?

Now, don't jump at me, I was not the one that bought the horse, but I don't want this good boy to go to waste so I have been trying to work with him since my dad hasn't really been up there at all to see him... . (I have never trained a horse before, but I have seen pro trainers and friends train, so I have somewhat of an idea.

But enough blabber, can anyone help me??

(Sorry for the longness!)
     
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    09-05-2009, 11:07 AM
  #2
Showing
Don't worry, it will all be okay. I would put a bit on him (snaffle is a good choice, I would get a bit hobble or curb strap just for the added safety. In case he starts bucking, that way the bit can't be pulled through his mouth) and just work with him on the ground getting him used to the pressure. Stand on one side and tighten the rein toward you, when he gives his head to the pressure, then release it and give him a scratch. Just keep doing this until he is comfortable holding his head each way with his nose almost to the stirrup for a few seconds (don't push to get him as far as he will go, just enough that he knows what is expected of him). Then stand in front of him and gently push both reins (one in each hand) toward his neck. When he flexes at the poll or takes a step backward, then release the pressure and give a scratch. Just keep working until he consistently breaks at the poll AND takes at least one step back. After he is consistent with all of this, then he would be ready for me to ride. Since you don't have much experience with training, you might want to take your time working on lunging and groundwork before you get on.

Before you ever ride, make sure that he isn't in any pain from saddle, feet, or anything like that. How much had he been ridden before Dad bought him?

Anyway, when you start getting on, make sure that you keep gentle contact with the inside rein but leave the outside rein loose (that way if he starts to throw a fit, you already have his head). When you start doing circles in the roundpen, keep the inside rein shorter all the time so that if he starts to buck, you don't have to readjust your hands before grabbing the horn and taking his head to one side.

You may be able to fix this issue but remember, if even for one moment you think you are getting in over your head, GET SOME HELP!! Good luck and I hope I helped

(and you thought yours was long LOL)
     
    09-05-2009, 11:13 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Don't worry, it will all be okay. I would put a bit on him (snaffle is a good choice, I would get a bit hobble or curb strap just for the added safety. In case he starts bucking, that way the bit can't be pulled through his mouth) and just work with him on the ground getting him used to the pressure. Stand on one side and tighten the rein toward you, when he gives his head to the pressure, then release it and give him a scratch. Just keep doing this until he is comfortable holding his head each way with his nose almost to the stirrup for a few seconds (don't push to get him as far as he will go, just enough that he knows what is expected of him). Then stand in front of him and gently push both reins (one in each hand) toward his neck. When he flexes at the poll or takes a step backward, then release the pressure and give a scratch. Just keep working until he consistently breaks at the poll AND takes at least one step back. After he is consistent with all of this, then he would be ready for me to ride. Since you don't have much experience with training, you might want to take your time working on lunging and groundwork before you get on.

Before you ever ride, make sure that he isn't in any pain from saddle, feet, or anything like that. How much had he been ridden before Dad bought him?

Anyway, when you start getting on, make sure that you keep gentle contact with the inside rein but leave the outside rein loose (that way if he starts to throw a fit, you already have his head). When you start doing circles in the roundpen, keep the inside rein shorter all the time so that if he starts to buck, you don't have to readjust your hands before grabbing the horn and taking his head to one side.

You may be able to fix this issue but remember, if even for one moment you think you are getting in over your head, GET SOME HELP!! Good luck and I hope I helped

(and you thought yours was long LOL)
Thank you so much for the fast reply!!
He was ridden quite a bit before my dad bought him. Taken on trail rides, ridden bareback. But when my dad got him, I think when he got on him, Pinto just freaked out. So he has been ridden, but I just want to take it slowly with him because we are different people than he has known for his first 5 years of life.

I will definitely. Take my time and practice the bit things with him, like the moving his head and everything.

Thank you so much again!
     
    09-05-2009, 01:50 PM
  #4
Showing
Hey, no problem. I hope it all works out and Dad gets to start riding him again soon. Just take it at your pace and don't do anything that you are not ready for or that you don't think HE is ready for.
     
    09-05-2009, 01:54 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Hey, no problem. I hope it all works out and Dad gets to start riding him again soon. Just take it at your pace and don't do anything that you are not ready for or that you don't think HE is ready for.
Thank you! Will do! I don't want to stress him or me out, so that is a good plan.
     
    09-05-2009, 02:24 PM
  #6
Cat
Green Broke
It seems you already got some great advice.

My boys moved from a bosal/hack to a snaffle fairly easily. I would put a snaffle on them the first day or two and just let them hold it in their mouth while I groomed them. This way they could get use to holding it without any other pressure or concerns. This really got them to settle down from mouthing it. Once I saw they were accepting it readily, then I moved on to asking for neck bends from the ground off the bit. Even some ground driving if you have long reins & a surgincle (I've even used a saddle and had the long reins run through the stirrups in order to ground drive- not the prettiest of set-ups but it works for the basics).

Once the horse is ground driving well, then I get up on the back and usually everything just progresses smoothly from there, especially if they are already used to being ridden in a hackmore. Just don't rush the early steps. I would rather take it a bit slower than the horse needs than rush it.
     
    09-05-2009, 02:27 PM
  #7
Started
Paint luvver
You don't have to worry about a bit - you could use a lungeing cavesson for ground work - or perhaps a Monty Roberts "Dually".
They both work off the nose but neither are fierce.

Protect the mouth - try even a rubber thick straight bar bit when you need to get up on his back.

Strikes me you need to back him again - and that is back to basics all ring work stuff off the ground.

Barry G
     
    09-05-2009, 02:35 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
It seems you already got some great advice.

My boys moved from a bosal/hack to a snaffle fairly easily. I would put a snaffle on them the first day or two and just let them hold it in their mouth while I groomed them. This way they could get use to holding it without any other pressure or concerns. This really got them to settle down from mouthing it. Once I saw they were accepting it readily, then I moved on to asking for neck bends from the ground off the bit. Even some ground driving if you have long reins & a surgincle (I've even used a saddle and had the long reins run through the stirrups in order to ground drive- not the prettiest of set-ups but it works for the basics).

Once the horse is ground driving well, then I get up on the back and usually everything just progresses smoothly from there, especially if they are already used to being ridden in a hackmore. Just don't rush the early steps. I would rather take it a bit slower than the horse needs than rush it.
I don't have any thing like that . Maybe I will got and just put the bit in his mouth today and see how he does with it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
Paint luvver
You don't have to worry about a bit - you could use a lungeing cavesson for ground work - or perhaps a Monty Roberts "Dually".
They both work off the nose but neither are fierce.

Protect the mouth - try even a rubber thick straight bar bit when you need to get up on his back.

Strikes me you need to back him again - and that is back to basics all ring work stuff off the ground.

Barry G
He was pretty traumatized after what all happened so I just want to back him again and make sure everything is a-ok.
     
    09-05-2009, 07:07 PM
  #9
Started
Paint luver , there is a lot of expertise on this Forum but we can't be with you when you are handling what sounds like a young frightened horse.
Be careful.

Make him yours - do everything for him, don't let too many other humans near until he starts to comes to you first. Obviously no loud voices, no heavy hands, no whips just firm, gentle, handling.
Touch him, talk to him, stroke him. Soft voice. You want him calm at all times. No whips, no loud noises. If he misbehaves just "No".
If he moves to hurt you then "Oi!" Use "whoa" & "stand" & "good boy" a lot. He has got to trust you implicitly. At 5yo, he is still an adolescent

As regular training I would walk him in hand (I'd wear a good set of boots) preferably in an arena so you can let go if necessary. Walk, stop, turn - all very simple basic stuff. Set up some little obstacles to negotiate.

But don't try much until you've got his feet better. Remember "no feet, no horse".

The important thing is a constant daily routine. Get him to expect to work. Horse seek routine, and security. Some horses, with good cause, fear humans.

Reward him with lots of verbal praise, stroking and the occasional apple or carrot. Give him some tender loving care.

Take your time, step to step. Don't rush anything. Small successes but every day a small success.

For a young woman, you are taking on a lot. Unless he is malicious by nature, then it is more likely he is frightened and a horse which is acting frightened doesn't listen. That is when you are at risk.

Pat Parelli can back and ride an untouched horse within a few hours - it will take you a little longer - but does it matter?

Best of luck

Barry G
     
    09-05-2009, 09:00 PM
  #10
Started
Work on getting him to take the bit. Once you're there, lead and lunge with the bit. Add the saddle and the bit. Go from there..
     

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