Introducing horse to the bit....
   

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Introducing horse to the bit....

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  • Horse introducing bit
  • Introducing my horse to a bit

 
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    09-07-2010, 07:22 PM
  #1
Yearling
Introducing horse to the bit....

So I haven't owned Hope that long and I have just been riding her in a halter and lead rope. I feel that its the right time to introduce her to the bridle again. She was raced as a two and three year old and sat for 7 years before I got her so she hasn't had a bit in her mouth for a long time. What type of bit would you suggest. I do have a simple snaffle. Also I did have a instructor that said if the horses fusses with the bit to strap there mouth shut with the flash. Would'nt that just cause the horse to tense up or cause more problems. Any tips would be greatly appriciated.
     
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    09-07-2010, 07:45 PM
  #2
Trained
What kind of horse? TB? For TB's, I would use a french link or oval mouth bit. In racing, they use a big, fat, single-joint snaffle that they lean all their weight into. Pressure means go faster. To avoid this, and the nutcracker action of a single joint, I would go with one of the two I mentioned above. I prefer a D-ring or eggbut over loose ring. If she isn't OTTB, I would still recommend a french link, it's far gentler than a single-joint.

No, you do not need a flash to strap their mouths shut. In cases like that, it is a tool used to hide the fact that the rider is in fact a poor one, and isn't making "on the bit" a nice, happy place for the horse. I use one because I like the look of it, but it fits like a baggy t-shirt would; loosely.
     
    09-07-2010, 07:53 PM
  #3
Started
I'd never use a bit that'd pinch or cause any pain. I'd use an unjointed snaffle (roll-bar center, so no pain caused), with rings that are built to prevent catching & pinching skin, or else put rubber pinch-guards on them, or have a D or egg-butt.

Copper inlay is far better than none, as well.

Stick to a good snaffle such as described, for horse's entire schooling. Horse shouldn't have to go to a harsher bit than this for any reason other than dangerous, do-or-die situations. People talk about the added "refinement" that a curb brings, but the curb is just a leverage device, like a can-opener, which controls the horse via pain.
     
    09-07-2010, 08:03 PM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
People talk about the added "refinement" that a curb brings, but the curb is just a leverage device, like a can-opener, which controls the horse via pain.
Please don't lie to people. It IS a refinement aid. A curb, used properly, is a marvelous tool. It becomes bad when the rider is bad. I ride in a Kimberwick, because my mare loves it. Put any kind of broken bit in her mouth and she's miserable. But a Kimberwick? She is butter in my hands. I can feel her say, "Yes, this is what I want, this is comfortable." Her mouth gets frothy, her neck raises and arches, her hind end comes up underneath us, she puts herself in my hands as softly as a butterfly, and boy does she strut!

Would I recommend a curb to a rider I didn't know? Absolutely not. It is very easy to be harsh with one, and without knowing that the rider is a soft and forgiving one, things can go sour very quickly. I would also not recommend a curb for this particular horse and rider. As I said, a nice french link would probably suit this pair just fine. An unjointed bit is much easier to lean on than a double-jointed, which would cause a green OTTB to up the pace. The french link is the softest of bits, are you really saying it is painful, Northern?

Different strokes for different folks. The proof is in the pudding.
     
    09-07-2010, 08:25 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
I'd never use a bit that'd pinch or cause any pain. I'd use an unjointed snaffle (roll-bar center, so no pain caused), with rings that are built to prevent catching & pinching skin, or else put rubber pinch-guards on them, or have a D or egg-butt.

Copper inlay is far better than none, as well.

Stick to a good snaffle such as described, for horse's entire schooling. Horse shouldn't have to go to a harsher bit than this for any reason other than dangerous, do-or-die situations. People talk about the added "refinement" that a curb brings, but the curb is just a leverage device, like a can-opener, which controls the horse via pain.

Northern,
With all due respect and kindness intended,
If you could just expose yourself to someone that approaches the various bits as a soft progression for the education of the horse you might change your mind some.

A solid bit is VERY comfortable in some horses mouths and they enjoy packing the bit more than a broken mouth piece.

A person that grabs a plain ring snaffle and pulls with two hands collapses the bit inward and the bit breaks forward into the palate of the horse.

This is not how it is intended to be used ....but it happens every day.

As the horse learns the signals and cues from the curb,they can become very accepting and relaxed if it is introduced correctly.

Yes it can be used wrong,yes it can torture,yes it can over bend.
And the automobile causes 35,000 deaths each year in the United States.

I still am not giving up my truck.
     
    09-07-2010, 08:28 PM
  #6
Started
I lie not. (wow!) OP can research & will find that a Kimberwick is a leverage bit, plain & simple. "Marvelous" only if leverage action is marvelous in your sight.

I never said that a French link is a painful bit--?? Yet, you yourself say that your mare is unhappy in any broken mouthpiece, which includes the French link!

LOL- OP, aren't you glad you asked?

ETA: Marecare, you posted before I got this on; thanks for kind-spirited post. I really don't think it's appropriate, in consideration of OP, to go into depth here, so won't.
     
    09-07-2010, 08:41 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
I'd never use a bit that'd pinch or cause any pain. I'd use an unjointed snaffle
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
I lie not. (wow!) OP can research & will find that a Kimberwick is a leverage bit, plain & simple. "Marvelous" only if leverage action is marvelous in your sight.

I never said that a French link is a painful bit--?? Yet, you yourself say that your mare is unhappy in any broken mouthpiece, which includes the French link!
I never said a Kimberwick isn't a leverage bit. But that doesn't change the fact that my hands are soft and my horse is soft in it. We do our best riding in it.

My mare is unhappy in a broken bit. Your point? Some girls wear bikinis, some wear thongs. Different strokes for different folks. Not every horse will respond the same in every bit. My little one loves her french link. My mare does not.
     
    09-07-2010, 08:57 PM
  #8
Started
Riccilove, don't you find it rude to the OP to carry on here? Open a bitting thread if you want.

OP, I do hope that you find the right bit for your horse & sorry that your responders here disagree. Perhaps you've gleaned some information.
     
    09-07-2010, 09:01 PM
  #9
Trained
Rude? Hardly. You told her curbs were the devil incarnate, and I disagreed. Being members of this forum means giving and receiving ALL the information about a topic. I see no reason for the OP to be a curb-hater because you told her to be.
     
    09-07-2010, 09:27 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
Horse shouldn't have to go to a harsher bit than this for any reason other than dangerous, do-or-die situations. I refer to a curb here, riccilove so I did say that the curb has its uses. People talk about the added "refinement" that a curb brings, but the curb is just a leverage device, like a can-opener, which controls the horse via pain.
Proof that I did not try & make a curb-hater out of poor OP! I'll add that, imo, a horse should be trained to accept a curb for the times when it's needed, for your information--OP needed beginning information, so that's what I gave.

Regardless of your illusions that you're handling your mare "softly" in a curb, you're controlling her through pain, that comes from applying leverage. That's why you use a curb in war, rough country, & prairie fires.

She "loves" the curb? No, she obeys, because otherwise, she knows what's coming. Why on earth would she "love" this device? Someday, it may stop working for you, because she's not truly accepted a non-painful snaffle.

I give my opinions here for horses.

I'd appreciate your not calling me a liar, etc.--so unwarranted!
     

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