Introducing a new horse to the herd
   

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Introducing a new horse to the herd

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  • Herd running new horse
  • My gelding chases the new horse in the herdf

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    04-03-2012, 10:08 PM
  #1
Foal
Introducing a new horse to the herd

I have 3 older QH mares (22+ yrs old) and I just got a new TB mare that is 7. I have introduced new horses to the herd in the past without problems. I usually just put them together and let them figure out their differences. I know they have to figure out the order of command! This time is different. One of my horses is being so aggressive toward the newbie that I am afraid of whats going to happen if I just let her fend for herself (but I don't know what else to do!) She is trying to eat her every time she is anywhere close. Slamming herself into the stall door when the TB walks by, pinning her ears, showing her teeth, kicking the stall walls etc. The QH is not the alpha mare, but not the bottom either. I know that if the TB were to just plant a few hoof marks on the QH, it would all be over. The TB is at least a hand taller and has 100+ lbs on the QH.

The TB came from a very large farm (60+ horses) where she was always pastured with different horses and got along fine. She really wants to be with my girls. Any suggestions???
     
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    04-03-2012, 10:14 PM
  #2
Foal
If you can, put them in stall side my side so they can see each other for a week and don't do anything you are already different, feed them in sight, lead her in front of her stall, just let them get used to it. One of my mare's is very dominant, and we bought my gelding she was very aggressive with him, but once they got used to seeing each other in their stall runs everyday the were fine. Make sure the first time you actually put them together their is no hay to fight over, the best bet would be a pasture so the grass is a distraction.
     
    04-03-2012, 10:33 PM
  #3
Weanling
IN MY OPINION…

You think it would all be over if the TB were to plant a few hoof marks the QH, but I don't think so. It's not who is the biggest that matters, but who is the most determined in their intent. If the QH is throwing herself against a stall door then I think she will definitely hurt the TB if these 2 got together. Sometimes, even when one gives in, the "winner" keeps going at them, not usually, but I've seen it happen. Sometimes horses simply do not get along and only they know why.
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    04-03-2012, 10:59 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Poor    
IN MY OPINION…

You think it would all be over if the TB were to plant a few hoof marks the QH, but I don't think so. It's not who is the biggest that matters, but who is the most determined in their intent. If the QH is throwing herself against a stall door then I think she will definitely hurt the TB if these 2 got together. Sometimes, even when one gives in, the "winner" keeps going at them, not usually, but I've seen it happen. Sometimes horses simply do not get along and only they know why.

My sister has a gelding that gets run to death by the other horses, we tried the let them figure it out but he ended up with a puncture wound, where I guess he backed into a tree branch or something and were pretty sure that this 15h horse was put in that situation by a 13h mare. We basically just split the pasture in two and he is with another gelding who is very passive as well, so they get along fine. It's weird but basically none of the other horses like him. I'm not talking about running him off food either they literally run him.
     
    04-04-2012, 12:38 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by chandra1313    
My sister has a gelding that gets run to death by the other horses, we tried the let them figure it out but he ended up with a puncture wound, where I guess he backed into a tree branch or something and were pretty sure that this 15h horse was put in that situation by a 13h mare. We basically just split the pasture in two and he is with another gelding who is very passive as well, so they get along fine. It's weird but basically none of the other horses like him. I'm not talking about running him off food either they literally run him.
I find that INTERESTING! I have a theory on why some horses don't get along with others, but that's all it is, a theory. Basically, it has to do with the way the "outsider" acts…they don't act like the herd they are being introduced to expects because it was "raised" differently. A number of years ago, we had a loose BLM horse get in with our herd and the way my horses treated it was almost like it (the BLM horse) was being rude. I can't tell you why that's the impression I had, but it was. My horses took turns kicking the snot out of it and even went so far as to, what seemed like to me, gang up on it to herd it INTO the fence. Not one or two of them, but all 6 of them! And it wasn't a matter of not enough room to get away…it happened when they were overwintering on a 600 acre wheat stubble field! The only thing I can think of is that the BLM horse did not act like my horses expected it to even though the BLM horse didn't do anything "wrong" that I could tell, and it seemed different than a "pecking order/herd ranking" issue. It seemed like they did not like that horse because it WAS different. Perhaps the environment in which a horse is raised does have something to do with how it gets along with others. Large TB farms do not have the same routines and "lifestyle" that ranch raised QHs do. Perhaps TBs raised in that environment understand each other and when introduced into a totally new "type" of herd, may be misunderstood. These misunderstandings are not overt, but extremely subtle…we may not be aware of any differences, but they are, and while some horses will be extremely tolerant of what might be considered "rude behavior", others may not. Then again, horses, like people, could have personality differences that just cannot be resolved. Kind of like when people rub you the wrong way even though they've done nothing against you personally…you just don't like them because you don't.
     
    04-04-2012, 03:58 PM
  #6
Weanling
I am not a big fan of putting a new horse together with the other horses at the first day. They should get a chance to get to know each other over the fence for at leat a week. And during that week they usually already figure out who is in charge and who isnt. Just think it is not fair to put them together without to know what is going to happen....
     
    04-04-2012, 09:14 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Poor    
I find that INTERESTING! I have a theory on why some horses don't get along with others, but that's all it is, a theory. Basically, it has to do with the way the "outsider" acts…they don't act like the herd they are being introduced to expects because it was "raised" differently. A number of years ago, we had a loose BLM horse get in with our herd and the way my horses treated it was almost like it (the BLM horse) was being rude. I can't tell you why that's the impression I had, but it was. My horses took turns kicking the snot out of it and even went so far as to, what seemed like to me, gang up on it to herd it INTO the fence. Not one or two of them, but all 6 of them! And it wasn't a matter of not enough room to get away…it happened when they were overwintering on a 600 acre wheat stubble field! The only thing I can think of is that the BLM horse did not act like my horses expected it to even though the BLM horse didn't do anything "wrong" that I could tell, and it seemed different than a "pecking order/herd ranking" issue. It seemed like they did not like that horse because it WAS different. Perhaps the environment in which a horse is raised does have something to do with how it gets along with others. Large TB farms do not have the same routines and "lifestyle" that ranch raised QHs do. Perhaps TBs raised in that environment understand each other and when introduced into a totally new "type" of herd, may be misunderstood. These misunderstandings are not overt, but extremely subtle…we may not be aware of any differences, but they are, and while some horses will be extremely tolerant of what might be considered "rude behavior", others may not. Then again, horses, like people, could have personality differences that just cannot be resolved. Kind of like when people rub you the wrong way even though they've done nothing against you personally…you just don't like them because you don't.
I actually agree with that statement, I couldn't quite put my finger on it but I felt that way about this gelding. I call him dumbo (affectionately), sometimes I feel like he is not paying attention and sorta just wanders into the group. I noticed that the horses here that lower their heads down to the lead horse and comes in submissive gets to eat with the lead horse, whereas the ones that don't get told to leave he is a slow mover except when he is being chased and even then it's almost like he just runs regardless of whether there is a fence or tree in his way. I feel he is more of a danger to himself so we seperated him with another gelding who he gets along with.
     
    04-04-2012, 10:11 PM
  #8
Yearling
Put a fence inbetween them for a few days, then try introducing.

Hate to be a downer, but when my horse was introduced to a herd at a former barn, the 3rd in command did not get along with him. There were 5 horses in the herd. Mine was on the bottom (he's a very non-dominant horse). He got along great with alpha (we put them in together and they immediately started mutually grooming one another), got along fine with everyone else, but that 3rd in command gelding HATED him. We tried to let them work it out on 3 occasions with no good results. My horse ended up with bite marks on his butt every time. This horse would charge him, my horse would submit and run away, then stop and just stand. The other gelding would make another round and charge him again. He didn't give up until my horse went through the fence. It never changed up until I took my horse out of the pasture.

So they may never get along. It just happens sometimes.
     
    04-09-2012, 07:17 AM
  #9
Foal
If you can, you might want to cull out another horse (not this aggressive QH - preferably a fairly low ranking member of the herd) and put that one out with the TB for a few days. I've found introducing a horse to a herd is a lot easier if you develop a bit of a buddy system first. If they get along, usually the pair will go off together and things quiet pretty quickly if/when things get nasty. As others have noted, sometimes two horses don't get along no matter how much time passes, so it may be best to keep them apart, but this has worked pretty well for me.
     
    08-13-2012, 12:13 PM
  #10
Foal
I know this update is late, but wanted to post what our end result was if anyone else had this problem. We had separated the TB in a pasture with one of the QH and everything was fine. Then one day, the TB decided she wanted to be with the others.. she got a running start and jumped the fence (grrr!) and went running out there with the others. She chased them all around, kicked the QH in the butt a few times that had been aggressive toward her.. and that was the end of it. Now the all get along great. I know it doesnt always end that way.. but it worked out well for us. Wasn't exactly the way we planned, but its all good now.
     

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