Jumping... Good News and Bad News - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 12 Old 06-20-2010, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 508
• Horses: 1
Jumping... Good News and Bad News

Jerry has been very good about jumping most things up until about 2'3". He seems to be enjoying himself, actually. Anyways. We have a slight problem, and a good thing. I'll start out with the good thing.

Today in my lesson, my instructor had us doing a grid, which I thought would end up a complete disaster. Well, once again, Jerry proved me wrong. The grid was three trot poles, and then three jumps spaced out so that he could take one stride in between each one. He was PERFECT going through it! I was so proud! I didn't think he had the ability to do that yet! Plus, he seemed to enjoy thundering through the jumps (he was going very quickly...). My instructor told me that in this situation, though, you want a bit faster than lazy so that they get through it. Anyways, I was very proud.

On to the problem. Jerry HATES single fences. I had him going over maybe a 2' verticle the other day, and we had tons of refusals! I know I was in a proper position, he was headed for it straight, and I had my leg on, reins short (but not pulling), and I was encouraging with my seat. He just DID NOT like it! I can put him through a grid perfectly, but not a single fence. Any ideas why? Any suggestions on how to get him over it easily and enjoyably?

Thanks!
AngelWithoutWings54 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 06-20-2010, 10:40 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,622
• Horses: 3
when you did the single jump were you trotting or cantering into it ?

I would guess that he is having trouble knowing when to take off with out a placement pole.

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
gypsygirl is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old 06-21-2010, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 508
• Horses: 1
I always trot the first time, then we go up to a canter. He usually does okay at the trot, you know, he gets over it (not very nicely though). But when you pick up the canter he either races through it and takes it way too big or stops in front of it and takes it really high, or just ducks out of it and doesn't do it at all.
AngelWithoutWings54 is offline  
post #4 of 12 Old 06-21-2010, 10:28 AM
Started
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Quad Cities, IL
Posts: 1,775
• Horses: 3
Maybe he's doing better at the grid since it's not just a big jump set out there. Confidence wise doing the trot poles first allows him to be doing something easy that he knows is safe and he can handle and builds his confidence going into the jumps where as a jump on its own may be a little unnerving to him.
Poco1220 is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 06-21-2010, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 508
• Horses: 1
So should I put a few trot poles in front of the jump and work my way up to jumping it on it's own?
AngelWithoutWings54 is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 06-21-2010, 12:52 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Southern Alberta, Canada
Posts: 554
• Horses: 0
It is actually more difficult for a horse to see a decipher the height and width a vertical fence, rather than that of an oxer or a series of fences.
When a horse approaches an object, it will actually go out of focus and (depending on the object) eventually disappear from his field of vision. He also has poor depth perception - and I can relate this to my sister, who has zero depth perception, and does showjumping.
Imagine what the horse sees when trotting or cantering to a fence. He relies on you to get him there, and teach him to see those distances. Vertical, single fences have no depth. My sister tells me that these are the fences that scare he the most on course, because she can't see the distance very well. The horse may not be able to see the distance or the height very well, and this causes some to over-jump, take off early, refuse, et cetera.

Now, your guy. First, I would check for any vision problems that may be hindering him furthur than a regular horse. Second, check yourself - are you letting him have his head to freely adjust his vision (does he have a poorly adjusted martingale or something of the sort on)? Are you hestitating, or to the opposite, being aggressive? Are you being his confidence, his leader, giving him a reason to trust you?
Set up the fence with things like trot poles (or canter poles), ground lines, anything to give it some depth, and then slowly take that depth away until he is more sure of himself.
And remember to be understanding and empathetic - when a horse refuses or does something silly over a jump, he has a good reason for doing such. Don't get angry, don't get passive - just reassess, retry, find the root of the problem, and approach it. It already sounds like you are doing such though! ~


Check out these articles. I also saw a video a while back that simulated the horses vision as it approached a jump, but I can't find it. I'll try to, though.
Wikipedia - Equine Vision
Suite 101 - Horse Vision

sing mε a blazing northεrn sky.

Last edited by dressagexlee; 06-21-2010 at 12:59 PM.
dressagexlee is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 06-21-2010, 03:13 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,622
• Horses: 3
^^ I can totally relate to that, I really only have vision in one eye & so my depth perception is basically not... once im close to a jump I really have no idea where im at I just have to feel it. Verticles especially on a diagonal are very hard, I just have no idea where the jump is. Horses don't just know their striding when they start out jumping. I would use trot poles or a single placement pole in front of single jumps.

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
gypsygirl is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 06-25-2010, 10:38 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eventing Country
Posts: 8,220
• Horses: 0
Video's would really help to decipher what is going on :)

MIEventer is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 06-25-2010, 11:46 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: in my stables
Posts: 1,210
• Horses: 9
he is trying to tell you he is not happy maybe he is not confident! Maybe removew the large jumps and do trot pole, cross rails and cavellettis to build hid confidence.

The rushing tells me that though he is jumping he is trying to get it over with as fast as possible!
HOw old is has been jumping long?
Could his legs and saddle be hurting him?

To give a horse your heart guarantees a love that will last forever undamageable
MaggiStar is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 06-25-2010, 11:51 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 256
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggiStar View Post
he is trying to tell you he is not happy maybe he is not confident! Maybe removew the large jumps and do trot pole, cross rails and cavellettis to build hid confidence.

The rushing tells me that though he is jumping he is trying to get it over with as fast as possible!
HOw old is has been jumping long?
Could his legs and saddle be hurting him?

However,On the flip side. I used to ride a horse that used to rush because he was SO excited!!! If you jumped him ANYTHING under 3ft he would be bored to death (he was a 4'3 jumper) and he would rush like CRAZY because he was excited and just wanted to go higher.
upupandflyaway1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good news and good progress for Candi! 14 wk post op ~ Video ~ HalfPass Horse Health 3 06-19-2010 09:38 AM
Good and bad-ish news Tayz Horse Riding 9 11-29-2009 05:46 AM
Bad news then good news. APHA MOMMA Horse Talk 18 09-18-2009 02:23 AM
good news :D SonnyWimps Horse Talk 11 05-12-2008 01:14 PM
A bit o' good news! Small_Town_Girl Horse Riding 4 04-30-2008 02:05 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome