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Jumping the "young" horse.

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  • Jumping young horse and arthritis

 
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    01-30-2008, 07:59 PM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by horse_luver4e
I know but show me an old horse that doesn't have arthritis.
I'm not saying that (most) old horses don't get stiff. And not all old horses get arthritic to the point where they're lame, if they get arthritis at all.. I knew a few at my old ranch - 20+ years old that didn't take a step lame in the time that I knew them.
What I'm saying is that overexerting a young horse could lead to lameness that may not be there if the horse wasn't pushed and injured at a young age, I.e. Prematurely aging the joints because of stress on the ligament(s)
     
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    01-30-2008, 08:00 PM
  #12
Yearling
My horse loves jumping! Lol she's got the legs for it! Hehe She will acually go over the jump real easy and canter off all professional showing off! 8) And sometimes she even bucks! Lol I just love to see horses having a good time and feeling good!
     
    01-30-2008, 08:01 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by horse_luver4e
My horse loves jumping! Lol she's got the legs for it! Hehe She will acually go over the jump real easy and canter off all professional showing off! 8) And sometimes she even bucks! Lol I just love to see horses having a good time and feeling good!
Just because she likes it doesn't mean her joints do.
But I'm definitely not saying your a bad horse owner, or whatever. I'm really strong about this.
     
    01-30-2008, 08:07 PM
  #14
Showing
Like I said, that is your own decision. I just personally wouldn't because I know it could cause permanent damage that could show up later in their lives. I would wait until a horse is at least 4 to even start with cross rails. I'd even like to wait till they're 6 or 7 before asking to jump over 3'. But that's just me. I'm helping train my friend's WB filly (well she's kinda mine too.. ish) and we agreed that we wouldn't start her before she was 3 years old, and even then it would be for 6 months max to get her doing w/t/c, and bending correctly, then we'd turf her out for another 6 months and re-start her when she's 4. When we start her again, we're going to take her easy and not even think about jumping till she's 5. She has trotted over trot poles a few times as a long yearling, but will not set hoof over a jump until she's 4 at least, and then we'll make sure she has tendon boots on and the whole 9 yards.
     
    01-30-2008, 08:08 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Just because she likes it doesn't mean her joints do.
But I'm definitely not saying your a bad horse owner, or whatever. I'm really strong about this.
Aahh I know it's your opinion. :) But don't worry she will be fine! She's turning 4 March 11th and she's jumping 1ft and 1 1/2ft jumps. Believe me were I live, people I know still start breaking there horses when there a yearling and the riders weigh over 200lbs. Drives me crazy.
     
    01-30-2008, 09:19 PM
  #16
Green Broke
I hate that too. I work for a trainer and a lot of the horses he starts are 2 or even long yearlings. It really bothers me, but it's not his fault. Everyone wants their new horses ready right away and if he doesn't train them at the age the owner wants them trained they'll go somewhere else and he'll lose business. So he has to do it if he wants to eat. I just wish I could talk some sense into some of the owners.

There was this little paint who had just turned 2 and he was breaking her. She was smaller than most yearlings and barely even 13 hands I would think. I felt so bad riding her, she was so tiny and she got worked just like all the other horses would have. It's sad that people can't see how this is bad on a young horse.
     
    01-30-2008, 10:27 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by horse_luver4e
Believe me were I live, people I know still start breaking there horses when there a yearling and the riders weigh over 200lbs. Drives me crazy.
That makes me sick. No offense to you horseluver.
     
    01-30-2008, 10:31 PM
  #18
Yearling
I know I hate that
     
    01-30-2008, 10:42 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by horse_luver4e
I know but show me an old horse that doesn't have arthritis.
There are plenty of horses that have been well cared for working and competing well into their 20's. I do agree that many older horses have problems with arthritis.

As to the original post:

I think the real issue at hand though, why cause a horse to have ligament and tendon problems, and arthritis at 15, 12, 10 or even younger as opposed to their late 20's, when it can be avoided in most cases?

Jumping at any age is a high impact activity, and younger horses are not physically ready to do it. Even if they think they are ready mentally (though most of the time horses of that age can't possibly have the maturity or experience to really know what they are doing and stay level headed about it. They are prone to getting over-excited or frightened (though this happens with older horses too of course).

I feel this way about many high impact sports though. When I still barrel raced a few years ago, people were buying, training, and racing them younger and younger. Many were track rejects (still fast for barrels), who were racing barrels at 3 years old. The lameness of horse under 10 was SICKENING. Starting reining horses at 2 years old in hard training! Futurities for several disciplines where 2 year olds compete at a national level! Racing 1 and 2 year olds heavily!

What is the rush?!

My boy is turning 6 this spring (young still, I know, BUT), he has yet to take a single lame step because I have taken things slow with him...and not even as slow as some might. I rode him A LOT from age 3 on, and lightly as a late 2 year old. If I had been barrel racing him since 3, he would probably be arthitic by now.

My 2 cents...no offense intended toward anyone :)
     
    01-30-2008, 10:55 PM
  #20
Foal
I think many factors are on the horse and its rider. I am actually helping train some of my trainers youngsters and I am pretty little 5'5 and 110, so I can easily ride the younger ones. One is a half-welsh and one is a quarter horse. The half welsh needs things much slower even though she is quite a bit smarter, because her bones have not formed as fast. She is about 3 and we can walk, trot very well, we can canter but it is just harder on the bones so we choose not to do as much. I admit, we do jump over little x's because it helps them naturally canter with me up there instead of forcing. There is nothing wrong with doing it very lightly, its jumping bigger every time as a baby that can end up with joint problemos. As for the quarter horse we can do a little more because quarter horses develop faster than welshs, warmbloods, or throughbreds.
I think the biggest factors in jumping younger ones are what the breed is, how big the rider is, the situation, and mentally how the horse can handle the task at a young age.
     

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