Just Load Please Charlie!!!! - Page 4
 
 

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Just Load Please Charlie!!!!

This is a discussion on Just Load Please Charlie!!!! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        08-25-2009, 06:18 PM
      #31
    Trained
    Quote:
    I also don't think anyone should be jumping on the OP that he is indeed traumatized, it could very well be that Charlie is just saying "I don't wanna". None of us are present when this is happening. Their body language is VERY different with the three most common types of trailering issues, reluctant, scared spit less and just being a brat. I would want to see a video of the process before making that call. Just because he's spinning, rearing or some other means of escape doesn't tell you which category of non-loader he falls into, it's the look in their eye's, tightness of their mouth and position of their ears that tell the story. Not all man handled horse's will automatically refuse to load the next time out of fear.
    Good post, definitely agree.
         
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        08-25-2009, 06:51 PM
      #32
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wild_spot    
    My theory on floating... The float isn't home, and I don't want my horse to think it is. It is a modeof transport. I want my horse to learn that they go in, we go somewhere, and they get to get out. I never load and unload my horse without going somewhere. Even if we have to use a butt rope, or it takes a while to load, I never unload and do it again. That isn't a reward. They get on the trailer, what you wanted, and instead of going where you're headed and getting off, they are made to do it again. Just doesn't seem like the best way, in my opinion. The journey and getting off at the end is the reward for getting on. Using this method, every horse I have/had has become a self-loader within a month, and stayed a self-loader for the time I've had them, and the ones i'm still in contact with are still self-loaders.
    If your horse has problems standing still while mounting, you get on and off a LOT. If your horse does something goofy in a certain place in an arena, you go by that spot a LOT. If your horse is scared of an object, you introduce them to it a LOT.

    My horse is afraid of the trailer. So when we have a trailer session, which isn't often, I admit it, but we spent a LOT of time working on it. We do Clinton Anderson's method by the way, even though I didn't know it at the time. So my horse only deals with the trailer every two or three months, and we don't go anywhere, but we get in and out a lot. I don't want it to be a big deal. I don't want her to finally get in, drive for an hour, and decide it wasn't fun at all, and not get in on the way home.

    And she does get a reward. When she gets in, we unload and take a break, let her graze for several minutes, love on her, brush her, and do it again. She knows when she unloads she gets all sorts of good stuff, so she needs to load to get the goodies.

    And to take it further, if my horse gets banged up and needs to see a vet, I need to know my horse will load. Sometimes, you don't have all day. Sometimes, you need to get in and go.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:03 PM
      #33
    Trained
    ^ ^ You may, but I don't. If my horse doesn't stand still while mounting, I don't get on until they are still. Once, i'm on, off we go. If my horse goofs at a spot in the arena, I use my own way fo dealign with spooks but it doesn't include going by it a lot. I have explained my way in other threads.

    The way I see it, I don't want unloading to be the break. I want unloading at the end of a ride to be the break. Otherwise, you MAY end up with a horse who constantly looks for a chance to unload to get a break/release.

    Quote:
    I don't want her to finally get in, drive for an hour, and decide it wasn't fun at all, and not get in on the way home.
    I have NEVER had this happen. What happens with my way, is they get on, go for a drive, realise it really wasn't that scary, and get on better on the way home.

    *Shrugs* It's different strokes for different folks. The logic of the load/unload/load/unload way just doesn't make sense to me. My way does, and has worked on every horse I have owned or floated so far.

    Quote:
    And to take it further, if my horse gets banged up and needs to see a vet, I need to know my horse will load. Sometimes, you don't have all day. Sometimes, you need to get in and go.
    Exactly. This confuses mea bit, because this is my point. I always get the horse in, and go. I can tell you right now that if I went out and grabbed my horses anytime of day/night, they would load straight up, 100% of the time.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:05 PM
      #34
    Trained
    Forgot to add. A big part of my logic is this: The aim of floating is to put the horse on, go somewhere, then take the horse off. Loading/unloading/loading/unloading/loading/unloading teaches the horse that you go on, then you get off. I never want my horse to think that the float is for going on, then getting off. I want my horse to think/know that the float is for getting on, standing quietly, going somewhere, then getting off when I say.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:12 PM
      #35
    Yearling
    Which is why it's important to incorporate short rides until the horse gets used to those, and then longer rides. You don't just load/unload, lather rinse repeat without going for short distances in the middle of that training.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:30 PM
      #36
    Trained
    ^ Short rides are fine. If i'm teaching a horse to load for the first time, then I will often just go for a 2 minute ride down the road! As long as there is something :]

    I know a lot of people who do just load/unload repeatedly and never go anywhere. That's the type of training that I don't get.
         
        08-25-2009, 08:34 PM
      #37
    Trained
    I'll tell you a story. Ricci was going to Paint shows for years when she was a youngin'. She was trailered all over the place for YEARS without a problem. She had a few years off, I took her to a horse show. She kind of hesitated getting in the trailer, but my friend gave her bum a shove and she hopped right in. My friend's mom drove like a maniac. She accelerated too quickly, stopped too quickly, turned too quickly. My horse **** near died of a heart attack in that trailer. I'm exagerating a little. What she really did was dance around so much I thought she'd knock the trailer over. She kicked off her shipping boots and tore open her right fetlock by stomping on it with her left foot.

    Now, because of the way that woman DROVE, my horse is terrified of the trailer. I have to work on making the trailer an ok place to be before I can start taking her places, because I'm sure once the trailer starts moving, she'll get all worked up again. Therefore, I can't just throw her in and drive off, because if she isn't comfortable in the trailer, it will be even harder for her to relax when I stat driving. Sure, I could just drive off nice and smoothly and go around the block, but she would be so anxious about her moving, she'd start dancing all over again, and could very likely hurt herself again, which just puts us back a few steps.

    If she hurts herself and I need to throw her in and go, I'll do it if I have to, because if she tears her leg open again, at least I'm going to a vet. However, I have no problem forking out the money for a farm call, if the vet can get to my place in a timely manner. Which is exactly the reason why I have the phone number for every vet in my area programmed in my cell phone and on a contact sheet in the barn.

    I respect that your method works for you and the horses you have dealt with. It just really wouldn't work for my mare. She can't even have another person around, she thinks they're going to shove her in, because we had to shove her in on the way back from the horse show.

    I also want to add that as long as my horse's back feet are in, she unloads ever so daintily. She only wheels back when it's her front end in. We also spend serious time loving on her in the trailer, like 20 to 30 minutes before she unloads and gets a break. But practice makes perfect, so I will load and unload her as often as possible because I feel it will better prepare her.
         
        08-26-2009, 06:31 PM
      #38
    Trained
    Quote:
    I'll tell you a story. Ricci was going to Paint shows for years when she was a youngin'. She was trailered all over the place for YEARS without a problem. She had a few years off, I took her to a horse show. She kind of hesitated getting in the trailer, but my friend gave her bum a shove and she hopped right in. My friend's mom drove like a maniac. She accelerated too quickly, stopped too quickly, turned too quickly. My horse **** near died of a heart attack in that trailer. I'm exagerating a little. What she really did was dance around so much I thought she'd knock the trailer over. She kicked off her shipping boots and tore open her right fetlock by stomping on it with her left foot.
    That's one thing I cannot stand. I will ONLY let my horses be floated by myself or my dad, or someone who I have seen floating many times and KNOW that they are a safe, steady, considerate driver. There is nothing worse for a horse than having a bad experience in a float while driving. I think the way we drive our horses is also a big part of why and how well they load/unload.

    Brookelovesparelli on here has a little brumby gelding. I had him for a season as alease before she got him. The father fo the girl who owns him is a bit of scary float driver, goes too fast, etc. When we got Buddy he was scramble and freak out every right hand corner. It was weird. We swapped the side he travelled, and he was fine! Silly pony. After floating on the other side for a while, he learnt how to balance again and was ok on both sides. Just a funny little story I guess.
         
        08-26-2009, 09:01 PM
      #39
    Banned
    When training a new guy to trailer I load him up with a friend and drive about 2 miles to a good grazing area by a lake, unload, hand graze him, tie him to the trailer, groom, reload and drive to another park about 1 mile closer to home and unload, hand graze , reload and take home.
    I do this a few times a week for a few weeks and if the horse seems totally fine with it I cut back and trailer to 2 rides a week for a month of so and then don't worry about it any longer.
    I loaded my new guy every single night, 2 times per session for about 2 weeks and then quit because he totally accepted it
         

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