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kicking and food aggression

This is a discussion on kicking and food aggression within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        02-01-2010, 10:12 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Aqha13~he doesn't yield to pressure at all. He will push into you and he will not give up! I've stood there for 45 minutes pushing a finger into his hindquarters and I am usually the one to give up (bad I know) I would brush him but I don't think he enjoyis it. Because as of right now he has a bad case of Rainrot that we are trying to get rid of. So of course brushing hurts for him right now.

    NittanyEquestrian~ I do have a lungeline and lunge whip. So just never really used them. He does backup well under saddle. And you can back him up with his halter. We definitely don't beat him. But as I said he isn't scared of anything. Including a whip. I use the whip to help desensitize him. As he didn't like the hindquarters being touched what so ever.
    As for trying to get him to yield his rear. You mean kinda walk in a circle with him. While pointing and telling him to move his butt? I'll see if I can find some clinton and parelli videos as well.

    I think I have finally bitten off more than I can chew with this guy. However he is absolutly wonderful when he isn't around his grain. We are teaching him to ride. And he has been ridden about 6 times so far. And he is doing fantastic. My little brother is the one riding him. Sometimes he'll be a little head strong. But we are working on it. I'm really hoping we can get past the aggression and he can become a well mannered horse!
         
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        02-01-2010, 10:44 AM
      #12
    Trained
    I wouldn't get on a horse that wouldn't disengage his hindquarters and move away from pressure. You need to escalate the pressure untill he can no longer ignore it. Don't stand there for 45 minutes touching him on the side. Poke him alittle then if he doesn't move poke harder and harder untill he moves. If you tip his head toward you and apply some pressure to his hindquarters he will likely step over then you can release the pressure and rub him a little.


    You have deffinately bitten off more than you can chew. You will have a much better horse if you send it to a trainer for a couple months. It will be money well spent and then you can enjoy your little horse for years and years.
         
        02-01-2010, 06:23 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    I wouldn't get on a horse that wouldn't disengage his hindquarters and move away from pressure. You need to escalate the pressure untill he can no longer ignore it. Don't stand there for 45 minutes touching him on the side. Poke him alittle then if he doesn't move poke harder and harder untill he moves. If you tip his head toward you and apply some pressure to his hindquarters he will likely step over then you can release the pressure and rub him a little.


    You have deffinately bitten off more than you can chew. You will have a much better horse if you send it to a trainer for a couple months. It will be money well spent and then you can enjoy your little horse for years and years.
    I totally agree with sending to a trainer. Hunter (a rescue as well) had gone to a trainer at the beginning of January, partially for some ground manners but mostly for the same thing. Food aggression. I'm not exactly sure what she did (probably most of what you have read here) but she had him backing away from his food within a week. She told me the first time she went in she almost had to call for someone to open his stall door. He would come at you with his teeth bared and ears back. Threatened to kick but never has actually kicked. Unfortunately we had to cut his training short and bring him back to our barn for a while. I am hoping he can get back there soon and finish his training as he is starting to get aggressive again. I would totally recommend getting a professional to do it. Its worth the money.
         
        02-01-2010, 06:32 PM
      #14
    Trained
    It's only worth the money if you keep up on what the trainer has been doing and don't let the horse slide back into the old habits.
         
        02-01-2010, 06:38 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Yeah ok i'll try that. He have a trainer that has been teaching us and our horses some of this. But he hasn't been over since we got this guy. And you guys suggest a trainer? How much does that usually cost? We are exactly on the high end of the financial scale unfortuantly.
         
        02-02-2010, 09:35 AM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    It's only worth the money if you keep up on what the trainer has been doing and don't let the horse slide back into the old habits.
    Too true
         
        02-02-2010, 09:39 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lilkitty90    
    yeah ok i'll try that. He have a trainer that has been teaching us and our horses some of this. But he hasn't been over since we got this guy. And you guys suggest a trainer? How much does that usually cost? We are exactly on the high end of the financial scale unfortuantly.

    Well I don't have a whole bunch of money either, but I was willing to give up something else because I want to enjoy many years with Hunter and want him to start off right. It cost me $700.00 for a month and that includes board, but she gave me a deal. She is usually approx $1000 for a month board included. Just make sure you find a good trainer as there are a lot of people out there that think they are "trainers" and could do more harm than good with your horse and make sure that you can be a part of their training too so you can learn the correct ways to deal with them.
         
        02-02-2010, 09:45 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Well I have a trainer. But he can't really do much in the winter. But it's usually more on a weekend basis as well. On the weekends all his students congregate to his place. And we all take turns with our horses. (and watch the others so we also learn what they are doing as well!) and he is free. But I will have to wait for slightly warmer months for that. So I think i'll try all the suggestions untill around spring then. He can be the horse we take up to the trainers. And we'll have him work on food aggression and we can see how he does it. Then try ourselves then practice it when we get home so perfect it. Do you guys think that will work?
         
        02-02-2010, 10:09 AM
      #19
    Foal
    My Thoroughbred Rescue Horse is very food aggrssive also. I actually wrote a thread about it last week, He bit me.

    I have started taking him OUT of the stall to feed him, and I keep him haltered. I also have my lunge whip handy. The moment he puts his ears back at me I worked him at a trot for about 5 mins until he calms down, then let him eat again.
    Took about 5 times before he got the hint, "hey, if I don't put my ears back and bite at mom, I don't get worked and can actually finish dinner".
    Eventually Soon I will start only taking the lunge whip out every few times, and then only when I need it.
         

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