Lateral Yielding
 
 

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Lateral Yielding

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        10-21-2013, 12:00 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Lateral Yielding

    I am currently working with my horse on moving off my leg and yielding laterally. He has about 50/60 rides on him and he goes nicely walk/trot.

    When we ride in the arena he constantly wants to move into the center of the arena( this is not a large arena, about 30 x 80 ft) so of course I want to use as much of it as possible. When I use leg to try to move him out on the rail, he seems to have it in his head that I am asking for rollbacks, and immediate ones.

    I want to eventually work cows with him, so I don't want to train this behavior out of him, but I am having trouble figuring out how to get him to understand I just want him to move out and off of my leg. He does this also in circles when I want to change sizes of circles.

    He direct reins right now and I am sure to hold with inside rein and support with outside rein.
         
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        10-21-2013, 12:18 PM
      #2
    Trained
    He sounds too green to know what you want of him. In the arena it is most important to work first on impulsion and straightness. He needs to be able to "track", that is he should be ~ 3ft away from the rail, except in the corners UNLESS your arena has rounded corners. (Mine doesn't. =b )
    To accomplish this you probably want to loose lunge him, pushing him to the outside track and then hand ride him (you are on the ground manipulating the reins with a short whip) or just leading him on the track until he understands that you want him to move there, unless otherwise cued.
         
        10-21-2013, 12:46 PM
      #3
    Foal
    Makes sense. I will see if it helps. Thanks!
         
        10-21-2013, 01:00 PM
      #4
    Trained
    IMO around 20/30 rides the horse should be taught to go sideways from the leg - at least before a rollback, because this issue crops up otherwise.

    Now, the first step in teaching a horse to go sideways (a leg yield) is to teach them the new thing the leg can do in an understandable way - just putting a leg on and expecting a response will illicit confusion (and in this case rollbacks) from the horse. So we begin at a walk. Walk to the center of the ring, stop, and ask the horse to move his haunches around his forehand (turn on the forehand). At first, ask only for one step at a time and walk off after a few steps. Eventually ask for two steps, and three and eventually a whole turn. As well the other exercise needed to be introduced is a simple turn from the leg. For this we turn from the middle of the short side and point to the adjacent long side, about 3/4 down the wall with no change of direction (in a dressage arena, tracking left it would be riding from C to V or A to R). Now once these two exercises are learned, we combine them. On the same line (C to V) add a yield with your left leg (just asking the haunches to move right) and after a bit of practice - you should have a yield. The whole thing should take no longer than 5 short rides with a clear objective and a teaching attitude.

    When you are riding think with these young ones - quality over quantity! Good luck
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        10-21-2013, 01:41 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    IMO around 20/30 rides the horse should be taught to go sideways from the leg - at least before a rollback, because this issue crops up otherwise.
    I completely agree, and as far as I know, the trainer never taught him rollbacks when he was with her. Which is why I am having such a tough time now.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    Walk to the center of the ring, stop, and ask the horse to move his haunches around his forehand (turn on the forehand). At first, ask only for one step at a time and walk off after a few steps. Eventually ask for two steps, and three and eventually a whole turn. Posted via Mobile Device
    He is quite good on turning at the forehand and will spin like this (5,6,7 times) if asked.The trainer he was with was a reining trainer so I don't know if she inadvertently taught him these maneuvers or if he is just confused.


    It seems this is his go to thing to do when leg pressure is put on unevenly(more with one leg than the other).

    When I move my leg back more in an effort to make it clear I don't want a forehand turn he will yield his hind end and spin that way.I know he is getting confused because I can tell he thinks he is doing what I am asking of him.
         
        10-21-2013, 01:46 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    As well the other exercise needed to be introduced is a simple turn from the leg. For this we turn from the middle of the short side and point to the adjacent long side, about 3/4 down the wall with no change of direction (in a dressage arena, tracking left it would be riding from C to V or A to R). Now once these two exercises are learned, we combine them. On the same line (C to V) add a yield with your left leg (just asking the haunches to move right) and after a bit of practice - you should have a yield. The whole thing should take no longer than 5 short rides with a clear objective and a teaching attitude.

    When you are riding think with these young ones - quality over quantity! Good luck
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Sorry, I am having a hard time visualizing this, are you turning in on the short side and going down the center or quarter line? (You said without changing directions) I am just not familiar with dressage letters in the arena so I'm not completely sure of their orientation
         
        10-21-2013, 02:06 PM
      #7
    Super Moderator
    So , he automatically, with lateral leg pressure initiate's a turn ON the forehand, or moves the forehand over (turn on the haunches)?.

    You can help him distinguinguish between moveing his hind over, and moving his shoulder over by using the inside rein to create a bit of bend, and an outside OPENING rein to encourage him to step over into the opening you have made by moving your hand outward (rotate outward from your elbow, so the elbow still stays in a correct position alongside your ribcage.).
    Over time, it should not take a whole openning of that outside rein, but just a little firming up on it , softening on the inside rein and inside leg to get him to move his whole body over, including the shoulder.
         
        10-21-2013, 02:49 PM
      #8
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    so , he automatically, with lateral leg pressure initiate's a turn ON the forehand, or moves the forehand over (turn on the haunches)?.
    Sorry, now that I read it, it really wasn't all that clear. He moves the forehand over (turn on haunches)
         
        10-21-2013, 05:31 PM
      #9
    Super Moderator
    Have you put 50-60 rides on this horse in a 30 x 80 foot pen and have not loped him yet? There is little he can do but 'duck around' or 'dummy up' in that small of a place.

    Please get this horse out of this tiny pen and teach him to go forward at the walk, jog and lope him. He needs somewhere to go. Worry about teaching him to follow his nose as he goes forward.

    The last thing a green horse needs is to be confused by rollbacks and turn arounds (spins) when it does not even know how to go forward enough to lope out in the open and lope a nice big unconfusing circle.

    We start teaching a horse to move off of a leg from about the 3rd ride on. We start 'bumping' them get a little bend in them. We bump them out using inside leg first. Then, we start changing legs when we ask for a direction change, usually at a jog. When we change direction, we like to change the 'shape' of the horse before we actually ask for a direction change. Then, they do not get in the habit of 'diving off' in the new direction. Learning to move off of the rider's inside leg teaches them to make nice round circles instead of making square corners.
    tinyliny and Corporal like this.
         
        10-21-2013, 05:52 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    For me, I start teaching leg cues from the ground. I use my thumb or my spur un hand to give the cue. When the horse moves away I reliece , then work on it from the saddle.
         

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