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LAZY, DEAD SIDED Pleasure Horse. HELP!!

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  • Reining: lazy clamp horses lope forward

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    10-06-2011, 01:14 AM
  #11
Banned
I am not a western rider, so I don't have much advise about that but I would be concerned that she is so young and has little interest in working.

If I were her owner I would stop doing that type of work entirely and make riding fun again for her. Take her out on trail rides, or with another horse and rider for a good gallop. Once she is enjoying herself again, I would slowly reintroduce the work you want her to be doing. And finally I would ditch the trainer who has been working her.
     
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    10-06-2011, 01:46 AM
  #12
Foal
I agree. I'm not a fan of the trainer, but I think the owner is starting to see just how hard he is riding her/pushing her. I'll definitely suggest a change in scenery for her to the owner. Maybe I can take her and them on a trail ride or some rides through the field and switch up her routine to get her mind back where it should be. For three and a half she should be at least enjoying her work!
     
    10-06-2011, 02:15 AM
  #13
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher    

If you have an arena or something similar try riding to a corner and stopping in the corner. Turn and go to the next corner then stop in the corner again, and repeat many times.

Horses are inherently lazy animals, but they are determined too find that laziness. Frequently stopping while riding a straight line teaches them that "laziness" is in front of them. So it's an effective way of getting a horse to willingly travel forward.

This is an interesting idea; that if she knows that she keeps up the lope to a set place, she will find a rest there. H m m m.

Another idea is to take her out of the arena , onto a trail if you can, put another horse in front and go for a good brisk gallop. Wake her up. Then have her in front and see if she'll canter under those circumstances.

My friend's arab is very lazy in the arena, but on the trail, that boy can run!
     
    10-06-2011, 03:48 AM
  #14
Weanling
Another way of saying it would be if the horse travels a set distance then gets to stop, consistently, then obviously the horse will want to cover that distance as quickly as possible, because it'd get too stop sooner.

Happens a lot with racehorses who seem to just want to get faster all the time. Truth is they really want to stop, they've just learned that going a long way away and getting there quickly will allow them to stop. Also happens a lot in reining when a horse begins to anticipate the slide stop at the end of the arena, so the horse accelerates much too fast in the rundown because obviously the faster they get there the sooner they get to stop and be lazy.

Not sure why people don't use thinking like that for lazy horses rather than just resorting too big(ger) spurs or whips.
     
    10-06-2011, 09:16 AM
  #15
Showing
At 3 she is still growing and may be having trouble balancing with the weight of a rider. Balance is easier at the walk and trot. She may also not be understanding what is being asked. Kicking can lead to balkiness and dull sides. If you opt to use a crop, be sure to ask for a canter first with your seat and leg, then tap her rib behind your leg to reinforce your leg. Tapping her on the hip may produce explosive bucking (instinct). Always use the lightest tap and gradually increase. If she lopes or canters on a couple of steps and breaks into a trot don't get after her. Just repeat your request. It helps the horse if initially you always ask at the same spot.
     
    10-06-2011, 09:18 AM
  #16
Green Broke
Is the arena soft? If it is hard young horse do not like to canter on it
     
    10-06-2011, 09:37 AM
  #17
Weanling
Everyone's giving you great advice :)
I would work on lunging or round pen with her until she gets up into a lope on the verbal cue quickly everytime. I'm working with a 3 yr old 17hh Percheron/Canadian gelding who doesn't like to move quickly either (I don't do much lopeing because of his size and age) but he's learned to get into the trott at my verbal cue and is getting into the lope a little cleaner with verbal cues as well - all due to lunging and roundpen work.
     
    10-06-2011, 12:06 PM
  #18
Foal
Another thing: do you ride with a loose rein? If your reins have no belly in them and she has a sensitive mouth that could be a reason she doesn't want to canter.
     
    10-06-2011, 12:26 PM
  #19
Green Broke
When you do rider her with a crop. Make sure you carry it on the OUTSIDE. You what that hip in, popping her on the butt on the inside with cause her to swing her butt out. Also be sure to use a verbal command when you do get after her. So next time she associates the cue with the crop, she will move forward more willingly.
     
    10-06-2011, 12:40 PM
  #20
Foal
To answer some questions posed here :

#1) yes the arena is soft. It's used for reining and western pleasure, so its kept very well and watered/dragged every few days.

#2) I rode her on a loose rein so she could have her head.

#3) she's a fairly big 3 year old, however I would like to see her put on more weight. She could gain maybe 50lbs of muscle.

#4) even when turned outside near other horses she doesn't show interest in playing or speed.

Tue trail idea is a good one, as is doing more longe work and carrying a crop instead of using spurs all the time.
     

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