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LAZY, DEAD SIDED Pleasure Horse. HELP!!

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  • Dull sided horse clinton anderson

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    10-06-2011, 12:42 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Once you get her loping. Kick kick kick kick. Get her moving. She isnt going to learn to forward motion by not having any.
     
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    10-06-2011, 01:11 PM
  #22
Yearling
You might try the crop or quirt which are similiar. You might also try the nub English spur. I have with past experience learned that no two horses will respond with like kind training techniques. Each horse is an individual in it's own right and needs a training signature suited to each one's traits and personality. However, speaking in general terms all training is one and the same per individual horse.
     
    10-06-2011, 01:15 PM
  #23
Foal
Clinton anderson's passanger lessons are great for horses like this. We had some bums at the barn I volunteered at and it really did wonders. It also breaks them of the habit of wanting to stop at the gate.

Lazy horses are my favorites to work with. They're lazy and sometimes pushy yes, but the plus side off their hard headedness is that not only does pressure (squeezing, clicking, kicking) not affect them as much, but neither does scarry objects. They learn to relax in new situations alot easier, and they're good problem solvers, which is why it's always good to mix up their schedule on a regular basis, or else they'll use the routine against you ( "ahem, miss, yes you with the reins, you do realize that at the end of our cantering sessions we are supposed back up five steps and then break for lunch, right? That's how it always happens around here, silly girl, and I don't want to be late. Here, maybe you understand the cro-hopping, pinned ears and tail swishing.... )

So anyways, the passanger lessons are simple. Squeeze (gently), cluck, spank.
The squeeze is our signal, the cluck is our warning, and the spank is our reprimand. I never kick horses anymore. Not because I think it's cruel and that people who kick precious horses are terrible people, lol, but because I find it less effective. Not only does it effect our seat, but it causes the horse to be tensein the shoulders and midsection. Kinda cuts through the flow of things.

So squeeze (gently), cluck, and spank (on the shoulder or bum depending on where your horse reacts better, and preferably with something that makes a slapping noise. The point is not to beat them into it, but instead bug the heck out of them until they give to the pressure, and maybe give them a little sting of shame.) as soon as they break into a canter, reward by releasing all aspects of pressure.

The other aspect of this exercise, is to do it on a loose rein and let the horse go wherever it wants. This is what cures the stickiness at certain areas of the arena. If the horse wants to be at the gate, fine. But it will offer no rest to its weary soul. If they want to canter circles at the gate, fine, let them, and as soon as they break away from the gate, let them rest. This will teach the horse to be responsible for its own feet and stay at its cruise setting. And don't nag. If the horse feels like it's going to break to a trot, let them, and -then- correct them for it. Let them commit to the mistake. Eventually your horse will learn that the only release of pressure it will receive will be when it's going the desired speed. And then all is happy with the world.

This exercise is also great for horses who want to go too fast. Most horses go fast because they believe that the faster they go, the quicker they'll be done. Make their idea turn against them. "Want to canter a blazin hundred miles an hour? Fine, I can do this all day. And I will! Boy, my horse has great ideas!" Canter them until they don't want to canter anymore and then canter them some more. After a few days of that, your horse will start to pace itself. "Gee, going fast isn't such a good idea, because who knows how long I could be doing this for?"

This method worked great for a lazy girl I used to work with. She went from a circle of teeth jarring trotting followed by a blast off canter to cantering gently off a gentle squeeze, maintaining pace, and gained a -much- slower canter. She also lost interest in the gate and stopped getting stuck in the middle of the arena. Once she no longer had an agenda, she was more responsive and stayed more attentive. She also got some pretty little muscles!
DraftyAiresMum likes this.
     
    10-06-2011, 02:56 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by .Delete.    
Once you get her loping. Kick kick kick kick. Get her moving. She isnt going to learn to forward motion by not having any.
This is the method I used the first time I rode her - but no matter the amount of kicking (with calves or bumping with spurs) she would stil dead stop, break down or back herself into a corner. But after about fifteen minutes of the insecent "bugging" with the spurs and my legs, I managed to get her around about 95% of the arena without her even thinking about stopping.
     
    10-06-2011, 03:03 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Val1991    
Clinton anderson's passanger lessons are great for horses like this. We had some bums at the barn I volunteered at and it really did wonders. It also breaks them of the habit of wanting to stop at the gate.

So anyways, the passanger lessons are simple. Squeeze (gently), cluck, spank.
The squeeze is our signal, the cluck is our warning, and the spank is our reprimand. I never kick horses anymore. Not because I think it's cruel and that people who kick precious horses are terrible people, lol, but because I find it less effective. Not only does it effect our seat, but it causes the horse to be tensein the shoulders and midsection. Kinda cuts through the flow of things.

So squeeze (gently), cluck, and spank (on the shoulder or bum depending on where your horse reacts better, and preferably with something that makes a slapping noise. The point is not to beat them into it, but instead bug the heck out of them until they give to the pressure, and maybe give them a little sting of shame.) as soon as they break into a canter, reward by releasing all aspects of pressure.

The other aspect of this exercise, is to do it on a loose rein and let the horse go wherever it wants. This is what cures the stickiness at certain areas of the arena. If the horse wants to be at the gate, fine. But it will offer no rest to its weary soul. If they want to canter circles at the gate, fine, let them, and as soon as they break away from the gate, let them rest. This will teach the horse to be responsible for its own feet and stay at its cruise setting. And don't nag. If the horse feels like it's going to break to a trot, let them, and -then- correct them for it. Let them commit to the mistake. Eventually your horse will learn that the only release of pressure it will receive will be when it's going the desired speed. And then all is happy with the world.

This method worked great for a lazy girl I used to work with. She went from a circle of teeth jarring trotting followed by a blast off canter to cantering gently off a gentle squeeze, maintaining pace, and gained a -much- slower canter. She also lost interest in the gate and stopped getting stuck in the middle of the arena. Once she no longer had an agenda, she was more responsive and stayed more attentive. She also got some pretty little muscles!
This is an excellent idea. I think I'll suggest to the owners, tomorrow or Saturday, that after taking her on a little trail ride/change of scenery (we have a nicely kept little trail system on the property that's perfect to get her switched up in her routine) to try some of these methods. I think I'll combine some of Clinton's methods with some ground respect and longeing work. Or at least teach the owners how to do most of it if they want to get involved! I think she'll benefit from a mixed up schedule - instead of knowing everytime she comes in from her private paddock or gets out of her stall she's getting ridden. If all else fails - maybe some time off in one of our large pastures with a group of horses will do her good mentally? (I realize it could make her hard to catch/unwanting to work or a number of things, but she acts like a robot - like she doesn't even know what it means to be a horse!)

Funny you should mention Clinton Anderson - I worked last summer at a ranch in Southeast Wisconsin where he started holding clinics/developing his system and learned from the people there most of his stuff! I think he's got exellent methods. I'll definitely be looking back into them to try on this horse.
Val1991 likes this.
     
    10-06-2011, 03:28 PM
  #26
Foal
Sounds great! I own alot of clintons dvds and use alot of his techniques, but I also study other trainers as well. It gives me an arsonal to work from.

And about the catching her and all...

Horses don't become hard to catch because we don't catch them enough or they get used to being lazy. They become hard to catch because every time we catch them they have to work or do something unpleasant.

On the days that you/the owners don't work her, they should go out and catch her anyways, and then do something pleasant. Every once in a while I bring a carrot with me when I catch my horse, but more oft than that I bring a rubber curry and scrub all his sweet spots. I'll even make it look like he has to work by haltering him when I catch him, but I just pamper him and then let him go. I have a crazy schedule, which sometimes means my horse will go a week/2 weeks without getting worked, but when I go out to the pasture, my horse is running to me, not away from me!
     
    10-06-2011, 03:35 PM
  #27
Foal
By the way, hope it works out! Keep us posted, I'm excited to hear how she goes! ;)
     
    10-06-2011, 08:18 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by .Delete.    
Once you get her loping. Kick kick kick kick. Get her moving. She isnt going to learn to forward motion by not having any.
debatable. If whenever you get the lope you stop and relax, horse will learn that in order to cause the rider to cause the horse to stop and relax, it just has to put effort into loping. And the straighter you lope before you stop, the faster/easier the horse will lope in future because the fastest way from A (where you begin to lope) to B (where you stop loping) is straight.

Again, reining horses expressing their anticipation of a stop by speeding up (especially seeing as stopping and speeding up are opposites) proves it.
     
    10-06-2011, 08:25 PM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sahara    
Over and under her with a rein or carry a crop. I never use spurs for forward work.

I always teach my horses a verbal precue so they know that I am about to ask for a lope. This always starts with longe line work and translates really well for the undersaddle work. Will she lope on a longe line?

You can also get off the circle and try to lope on straight lines out in a field, too. She may not have the balance and coordination yet to lope with a rider on circles.

I would try these tips in the reverse order - at 3 1/2 she may just not have the muscle and balance to be comfortable loping in a circle, and both physically and mentally she may not be ready for 2 days/week intense training. I bet going in straight lines outside of the area will work.
     
    10-06-2011, 09:36 PM
  #30
Green Broke
If a horse is naturally lazy, your darn tootin im going to push the horse forward.
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