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Leading yearlings with bits?

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  • Leading a strong yearling
  • Yearling bolts off when being led

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    12-24-2012, 03:25 PM
  #11
Green Broke
So true
     
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    12-24-2012, 03:37 PM
  #12
Trained
What scares me most is if they do break away, with a bit in, and go running down the road. If they step on the lead attached to the bit, that's massive mouth injuries waiting to happen. My mare has a scar where her tongue was almost cut off, dentist says he sees it all the time as a result of accidents with rearing bits.
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    12-24-2012, 03:47 PM
  #13
Started
I have seen horses at the sale being led with the bit in their mouth. A lot of people don't do a whole lot of work with yearlings but from what I have seen (which is not so much) the ones who are well trained and broke tend to sell for more. I am dealing primarily with standardbreds which are a whole other ball of wax then thoroughbreds. So, the buyers might want more "spirit" in the yearlings.
     
    12-24-2012, 03:50 PM
  #14
Green Broke
The horses getting with a bit scares me too.

That is why when I feel I can I don't use one rearing bit, I would love to take a good rope halter to work and use it though. Sometimes I have to use a bit because the nylon halters are so useless, the horses just lean again them. I have been dragged by an 18hh gelding who got pissed with me because I got up him for not quietly walking beside me. Some of the horses that come here have terrible leading skills.
     
    12-24-2012, 03:54 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Rookie: I think its the same for thoroughbreds. You can mostly tell which ones are good horses because they put a lot of effort into them. Also the larger well known places do better with their horses. Its the smaller/up and coming places like where I work that don't necessarily have qualified staff that tend to have the bad horses.
     
    12-24-2012, 10:20 PM
  #16
Super Moderator
I did not read all of the responses so forgive me if this has been covered.

Are these racing TB colts?

Is the bit a Chifney Ring Bit made for leading? Is it snapped into a halter?

If so, it is proper to train TB yearlings to lead in them and to respond to them. The only problem is that they need to be taught to lead by someone strong enough to hang on to one that wants to bolt. If a person is not strong enough to hold a bolter, then they should not be leading it as it will get very spoiled.

Years ago, I used to fit quite a few of these sale horses. They all had to be taught to lead correctly with a ring bit in a leather halter. I really hated to have to deal with one that had already learned to bolt and get away. [The only thing worse is a mule that has learned that same trick.]

If you have one that learned this little trick, you are going to have to ask the boss or another big strong person to let this horse try it with them and they have to be able to jerk this horse around and hang on. Otherwise, he will just get more and more spoiled.
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    12-24-2012, 11:15 PM
  #17
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
I did not read all of the responses so forgive me if this has been covered.

Are these racing TB colts?

Is the bit a Chifney Ring Bit made for leading? Is it snapped into a halter?

If so, it is proper to train TB yearlings to lead in them and to respond to them. The only problem is that they need to be taught to lead by someone strong enough to hang on to one that wants to bolt. If a person is not strong enough to hold a bolter, then they should not be leading it as it will get very spoiled.

Years ago, I used to fit quite a few of these sale horses. They all had to be taught to lead correctly with a ring bit in a leather halter. I really hated to have to deal with one that had already learned to bolt and get away. [The only thing worse is a mule that has learned that same trick.]

If you have one that learned this little trick, you are going to have to ask the boss or another big strong person to let this horse try it with them and they have to be able to jerk this horse around and hang on. Otherwise, he will just get more and more spoiled.
Yes, yes and yes. I worked at the track for many years and we routinely walked all the horses, young and old in colt bits/rearing bits/Chifney ring bits. Useful tools, very standard with racehorses.....they must ALWAYS be snapped onto the halter with the lead....without that some serious damage to the mouth can occur.

I would teach the young ones to 'spook on the spot' ie. They get scared, try to bolt.....but they learn that they can't by the handler practicing swift thinking and handling. Once they learn that they CANNOT get away they tend to just spook on the spot....it's a good thing to teach
     
    12-24-2012, 11:34 PM
  #18
Green Broke
The problem is that these yearlings are not being trained normal, benificial things. Instead of properly halter breaking, teaching them to give to pressure, trust a handler and go where they are told, like any other breed, instead these yearlings have minimal handling, then a bit slapped in their mouth and yanked around. I've been at the sales and watched $10,000 + yearlings flipping over backwards rather than lead into the sale ring, young colts dragging their handlers down the halls, slamming themselves into stalls and other horses.

There is absolutely NO reason these horses need to be led bitted. They need to be trained properly. I work with ottb's and yearling thoroughbreds, I have never felt the need to put any sort of bit on to lead even the most high strung. It is expected in the industry, but to me it's often unnessesary at best and potentially a poor bandaid solution that can damage a mouth and create bad habits.
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    12-25-2012, 05:13 AM
  #19
Green Broke
CHERIE: Yes these are racing tb colts and they are chifney bits we use. What frustrates me is I don't think they teach the young ones to lead properly before they introduce the bit. I have only just started being involved with actually educating the horses.

This particular colt has been spoilt for a long time as he was over friendly as foal and some people didn't stop him. Now he either spooks or gets quite arrogant towards people. He has been known to rear and run backwards very fast. I find he is just generally all round ill-mannered.

I had him get away from me once when he spooked and I slipped on the gravel a few weeks ago. He has gotten away from a few people a number of times though. I find it hard to hold onto them also when the leadropes are barely long enough to hold onto them if they rear.

When I walk him now I always carry a whip and use it to make him move his feet forward if he thinks of stopping. If he does plant his feet before I get up him I let him know there is going to be hell to pay if he takes one step backwards or he can take the easy way and move forward. I have had him stop on me a couple of times and back a few steps but he starting to realise that is that bad option to take.

As I'm not the only one who handles him I feel like I take 1 step forward, then 3 steps back every time.
     
    12-25-2012, 06:06 AM
  #20
Green Broke
Horses can be too smart for their own good. My wife's horse is a good example. He's an Arabian cross. We had an issue with loading him in a trailer. He figured out that if he could get his head on the wrong side of the door, we were in trouble. He would keep going and you wouldn't have a chance in holding onto him unless you wanted to be drug for a while. He would get the rope to cross over his back and then you had no control. That was mainly when my wife loaded him. After he tried that a few times with me, he learned it was a bad idea. The workout, after he was caught, was way worse than loading. He still thinks about it once in a great while but changes his mind pretty quick, especially when I'm handling him. He does know he can get away if it's my wife handling him. Funny thing is that when she starts having problems, she tells him "I'm going to get dad." which gets him to knock it off or have to deal with me.

Point of the story, even if one can stop them but others can't, they will still do their antics for the others. So it's understandable when you say you take one step forward and three back. It only works when everyone can be on the same page.
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