Leaning on the round pen? Never seen this before.
 
 

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Leaning on the round pen? Never seen this before.

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  • Horse leaning on fence when riding crushing leg
  • Horse seriously leaning on one room

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  • 2 Post By Muppetgirl
  • 2 Post By Cherie
  • 1 Post By Cherie
  • 1 Post By TXgrey

 
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    10-17-2012, 10:50 PM
  #1
Banned
Leaning on the round pen? Never seen this before.

I was riding one of our horses today on the trails near my house and she bucked and crow hopped quite a bit throughout the ride. So, I took her into the round pen and just loped her around until she was done. I know a lot of people don't like this "method" but, she needs some kind of discipline. Her ground work and foundation is rock solid, she just tries to get away with bad behavior.

Anyway, after a few rounds I would turn her in toward the round pen trying to get a spin from her. Oddly enough, she would spin to the right perfectly but when I tried to spin to the left... She would lean all of her body weight on the side of the round pen and just...stay there. Literally crushing my leg. It was odd, to say the least.

Saddle/bit/bridle/blanket fit is fine.

She's been checked by a vet and chiro regularly.

Not really sure what her deal is.

I didn't wear her out at all. She is very athletic and our ride was pretty short and easy today.
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    10-17-2012, 11:22 PM
  #2
Banned
She's probably in season.......be careful a mare can crush you just like a stud when their hormones are raging. I've had a mare pin my arm On the wall in the cross ties and I've had a boss nearly killed or seriously injured when a mare in season pretty much suffocated her in the cross ties by leaning on her.

Give her a few days and you might see a change....it's that time of year
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    10-18-2012, 06:43 AM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
She's probably in season.......be careful a mare can crush you just like a stud when their hormones are raging. I've had a mare pin my arm On the wall in the cross ties and I've had a boss nearly killed or seriously injured when a mare in season pretty much suffocated her in the cross ties by leaning on her.

Give her a few days and you might see a change....it's that time of year
Really? I had no idea they did things like that when they are in season.
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    10-18-2012, 08:32 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
First of all, her foundation is not 'rock solid'. She is not only NOT giving you her head to the left, she is giving you an awful lot of 'push-back' and not showing much respect.

A fact is: 'Round pens are for people and not horses.' We discourage their over-use unless a person is well versed in what things can be helped in one and what things are made worse. Leaning or scraping hard against the fence is one of the common things that can come out of round pen use.

One thing I would stay away from is turning toward the fence when you are right next to it. A horse does not have room to 'rollback' toward a fence if there is not 4-6 feet between the horse and the fence. [It is not a 'spin' in any way.] A horse cannot correctly roll back over its hocks, cannot set a hind pivot foot and cannot move its front end around without room to move it, so it is not a real good way to teach anything positive.

This horse does need to be taught to 'give' her head to you at all gaits. She does need to be taught to better 'follow her nose'.

If you are not comfortable riding her through her problems to 'fix' them, then I would go to a longe line and do very demanding, intricate exercises that require complete obedience. Longe through and over obstacles; make her go through and over things she does not want to do. You win those battles and they will convert much better to obedience under saddle that just 'wearing her out' in a round pen.

Once a horse is obeying you in complicated exercises on a line, go to ground driving and do the same thing. Cross ditches, big logs or downed trees, go past or over tarps. I drive horses up and down pond dams making them cross the creek-bed coming out of the bottom of the pond dam. Most horses will pretty much do everything with a rider that they will do while being gound-driven.
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    10-18-2012, 08:34 AM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXgrey    
Really? I had no idea they did things like that when they are in season.
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Yup, they do! Mares can be just as dangerous as studs when their hormones are raging! The mare I'm referring to in my previous posts was very difficult, you'd only find out she was in season when you touched her sides and she would just lean or virtually collapse against the nearest solid object, even if you were between her and that object! Studs can have the same behaviour, except they will really start rubbing against the wall, fence or whatever they can.....people have been killed by getting stuck between an excitable stud and a wall....
     
    10-18-2012, 11:36 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
First of all, her foundation is not 'rock solid'. She is not only NOT giving you her head to the left, she is giving you an awful lot of 'push-back' and not showing much respect.

A fact is: 'Round pens are for people and not horses.' We discourage their over-use unless a person is well versed in what things can be helped in one and what things are made worse. Leaning or scraping hard against the fence is one of the common things that can come out of round pen use.

One thing I would stay away from is turning toward the fence when you are right next to it. A horse does not have room to 'rollback' toward a fence if there is not 4-6 feet between the horse and the fence. [It is not a 'spin' in any way.] A horse cannot correctly roll back over its hocks, cannot set a hind pivot foot and cannot move its front end around without room to move it, so it is not a real good way to teach anything positive.

This horse does need to be taught to 'give' her head to you at all gaits. She does need to be taught to better 'follow her nose'.

If you are not comfortable riding her through her problems to 'fix' them, then I would go to a longe line and do very demanding, intricate exercises that require complete obedience. Longe through and over obstacles; make her go through and over things she does not want to do. You win those battles and they will convert much better to obedience under saddle that just 'wearing her out' in a round pen.

Once a horse is obeying you in complicated exercises on a line, go to ground driving and do the same thing. Cross ditches, big logs or downed trees, go past or over tarps. I drive horses up and down pond dams making them cross the creek-bed coming out of the bottom of the pond dam. Most horses will pretty much do everything with a rider that they will do while being gound-driven.
I don't over use it, I only use it to teach them something new or work out an issue.

I rode her through all her crow hops throughout the ride so I don't think that is the problem. I also rode her in the round pen.

We use her for hog hunting a lot of the time, so riding over logs and creeks and just about anything is routine for her. She is pretty versatile.

Ill have to disagree with you that her ground work isn't up to par. This horse is a really, really well trained horse on the ground (and in the saddle, she just has those days.)

Oh, and I wasn't turning 'right next to the fence.' I've worked with horses for a long time, so I sort of know what I'm doing:) They have plenty of room to roll back if they need to. These are cutting horses, so they know the drill.
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    10-18-2012, 12:32 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
If she is that well trained, then I would look for a sore tooth, a neck or back that has slipped out of place or a sore back or saddle that does not fit her.

Does she give you her face the rest of the time to the left, particularly on the same day that this happened?

I would really look at something else.
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    10-18-2012, 01:42 PM
  #8
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
If she is that well trained, then I would look for a sore tooth, a neck or back that has slipped out of place or a sore back or saddle that does not fit her.

Does she give you her face the rest of the time to the left, particularly on the same day that this happened?

I would really look at something else.
She did give me her head perfectly all day, just not to that side in the round pen for about 50% of the time.

I discovered that she is in fact in season right now so that could be why... I have her checked regularly for sore joints and slips, but if she continues to do it then ill have her checked again.
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