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learning how to ride

This is a discussion on learning how to ride within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • WOMEN RIDING SMALL PONY

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    03-03-2013, 12:03 PM
  #21
Green Broke
I have to share my story of learning how to ride. I too started off with a "learn together" type situation.


My father sold alfalfa to a local barn and they offered to give me free lessons. The first few times I went out there they put me on a broke pony and taught me the basics. The barn owner kept telling me "you're a natural! You're a natural!" Well her assuming that I was such a natural she started putting me on greener horses. She brought in a unbroke Halflinger/Arabian/Paint from Amish country (sounds like an ugly cross but he was stunning!). He was all attitude. She convinced my parents after 3 weeks of her riding him that they should lease him for me. So there I am with only 2 months worth of riding on a broke pony trying to ride a very green pony. The BO thought we could "learn together".

It was winter time by the time we decided to lease him. I would hop on him bareback with just a chain over his nose and ride him for hours inside the barn. I would walk him up and down the isles over and over again. He started a nasty habit of trying to rub me off on the wall. It got to the point where he would sidepass over to the wall and just lean on it. Not knowing any better, I got off every time. Then when spring time came we started riding up and down the driveway, bareback with just a chain. This is where our problems started, as soon as we would get to the bottom of the driveway he would rear. I didn't know any better to be scared, I just thought it was fun!

By spring my parents surprised me and bought him for me. This is when I started to try to take him on trail rides. He wouldn't go through water, or mud, or away from the other horses. He would run backwards through the woods smashing me into trees and other things. He would rear, try to scrape me off on trees, run through the bit and take off towards the barn. He also learned that if he spooked at something I would get off. So he picked up the habit of spooking at things on purpose. I can't tell you how many times I fell off that spring. I ended up being terrified of him.

When we finally brought him home in the beginning of summer, I would make my dad take care of him. I was scared to even touch him. Whenever the neighbor girl came over with her horse, I would always make her ride mine because I was too scared It was either get a trainer or sell the horse. Through my 4-h group I found a wonderful woman who was really big into NH. She focused on really building my confidence with him, the first maybe 20 lessons I cried the whole time. I can remember she always said "remember to breathe". After about 2 years of lessons my confidence was through the roof with him.

In 2005 I was cantering him along the tree line in my back yard. It was a little wet out from a previous rain. As we hit a mud patch he spooked, slipped, and fell on me. It ended up breaking my leg in 4 places. After that I sold him to a pony club in Flordia. Then he ended up at Alan Parker's TB farm where he was rode by Alan's mentally handicapped wife at shows. 2 years later my parents surprised me again with buying him back. The first thing he did when I tried to load him into the trailer down in Florida was drag me and get loose took us 20 minutes to catch him.

When I brought him back home I couldn't believe the horse he had turned into. He was the best lesson pony I have ever seen. He was perfect for children, beginners, and disabled people. He would have been the ultimate therapeutic riding horse. When I rode him all we did was fight, he would spook, rear, and carry on. But when a beginner was on him he was a different horse. I ended up selling him to a 9 year old girl who uses him for 3 day eventing.

Looking back on it now, I was in some serious danger riding him. I could have gotten permanently injured or worse, simply because I didn't know any better. No one told me "this isn't right". No one was looking out for my safety. Be appreciative that the people here have concern for your safety and are giving you good solid advice.


Here is the last video his new owner put up of him. (Even being naughty )

     
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    03-03-2013, 12:12 PM
  #22
Weanling
Horses are rarely stubborn or lazy, they merely learn to answer what they THINK the rider is asking. If the horse is allowed to go respond with minimal reactions (like a lead line horse for a small child) that is what it will do. If the rider puts the leg on (which is pressure) MOST young horses will stop or slow UNLESS they have been trained progressively (on the ground and by a knowledgable rider in the first place). You need a trainer (one who rides the horse) to get on the horse to teach IT how to respond first, and then a good teacher to tell you how to train the horse (not just ride it).
     
    03-06-2013, 08:15 AM
  #23
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple    
*sigh* how many times have we all heard this?

I know you don't want to hear that the horse is not suitable, it is your horse and you love it. I don't see how a 3yo could possibly have been a leadline horse for kids. At 3 years of age they are still just learning the most basic of commands and their training. There is a HUGE difference between a horse trained well enough to be used by kids and another being used to just give a little "pony ride".

Everybody on here is showing a genuine concern for you and the horse, and not trying to discourage you. As much as you don't want to hear it; you are taking a serious risk with such an inexperienced horse/rider combination. This is a recipe for disaster, with the risk of injury for both of you and the creation of problems with the lack of training on the horse.

I understand this is your horse, and I would urge you to find a good trainer to work with you both.

Yeh I Completely understand what your saying but iím not sure what I should do weather everyone is giving me the advice to get another horse or what ? Iím really confused with what to do.. and as he is my first horse I have grown very attatched too him...
     
    03-06-2013, 08:32 AM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by .Delete.    
I have to share my story of learning how to ride. I too started off with a "learn together" type situation.


My father sold alfalfa to a local barn and they offered to give me free lessons. The first few times I went out there they put me on a broke pony and taught me the basics. The barn owner kept telling me "you're a natural! You're a natural!" Well her assuming that I was such a natural she started putting me on greener horses. She brought in a unbroke Halflinger/Arabian/Paint from Amish country (sounds like an ugly cross but he was stunning!). He was all attitude. She convinced my parents after 3 weeks of her riding him that they should lease him for me. So there I am with only 2 months worth of riding on a broke pony trying to ride a very green pony. The BO thought we could "learn together".

It was winter time by the time we decided to lease him. I would hop on him bareback with just a chain over his nose and ride him for hours inside the barn. I would walk him up and down the isles over and over again. He started a nasty habit of trying to rub me off on the wall. It got to the point where he would sidepass over to the wall and just lean on it. Not knowing any better, I got off every time. Then when spring time came we started riding up and down the driveway, bareback with just a chain. This is where our problems started, as soon as we would get to the bottom of the driveway he would rear. I didn't know any better to be scared, I just thought it was fun!

By spring my parents surprised me and bought him for me. This is when I started to try to take him on trail rides. He wouldn't go through water, or mud, or away from the other horses. He would run backwards through the woods smashing me into trees and other things. He would rear, try to scrape me off on trees, run through the bit and take off towards the barn. He also learned that if he spooked at something I would get off. So he picked up the habit of spooking at things on purpose. I can't tell you how many times I fell off that spring. I ended up being terrified of him.

When we finally brought him home in the beginning of summer, I would make my dad take care of him. I was scared to even touch him. Whenever the neighbor girl came over with her horse, I would always make her ride mine because I was too scared It was either get a trainer or sell the horse. Through my 4-h group I found a wonderful woman who was really big into NH. She focused on really building my confidence with him, the first maybe 20 lessons I cried the whole time. I can remember she always said "remember to breathe". After about 2 years of lessons my confidence was through the roof with him.

In 2005 I was cantering him along the tree line in my back yard. It was a little wet out from a previous rain. As we hit a mud patch he spooked, slipped, and fell on me. It ended up breaking my leg in 4 places. After that I sold him to a pony club in Flordia. Then he ended up at Alan Parker's TB farm where he was rode by Alan's mentally handicapped wife at shows. 2 years later my parents surprised me again with buying him back. The first thing he did when I tried to load him into the trailer down in Florida was drag me and get loose took us 20 minutes to catch him.

When I brought him back home I couldn't believe the horse he had turned into. He was the best lesson pony I have ever seen. He was perfect for children, beginners, and disabled people. He would have been the ultimate therapeutic riding horse. When I rode him all we did was fight, he would spook, rear, and carry on. But when a beginner was on him he was a different horse. I ended up selling him to a 9 year old girl who uses him for 3 day eventing.

Looking back on it now, I was in some serious danger riding him. I could have gotten permanently injured or worse, simply because I didn't know any better. No one told me "this isn't right". No one was looking out for my safety. Be appreciative that the people here have concern for your safety and are giving you good solid advice.


Here is the last video his new owner put up of him. (Even being naughty )

Fall
WOW!! You must of gone through alotÖ so are you suggesting I should Sell him and get another horse ? A more experienced horse? It would be soo hard.. iím soo attatched already

But you right your horse was gorgeous he is stunning :) did see some naughties in the vid :) but I loved the vid and the song he is soo beautiful! <3
     
    03-06-2013, 08:34 AM
  #25
Super Moderator
You have to be very realistic an honest to yourself regarding your and the horses' experience. If you cannot afford a trainer for the horse and lessons for yourself, then it will be much safer and reasonable to find a good, new home for your horse and seek a good lesson barn in your area to gain more experience in a safe environment with older horses.
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    03-06-2013, 10:03 AM
  #26
Started
I got a horse back from a trainer last summer. He was a 3 year old at the time, race track flunkie. I was told by the "trainer" that he was a dead head, lazy and was a challenge to keep going (same one that sent back the horse that rears saying he can do level 2 dressage but you have to lunge him for 1/2 and hour or he bolts). I got on him for the first ride at home. I asked him to trot a circle he set himself to crow hopping and being a fool. Not behavior I expected from a lazy horse. He is a gem on the trail, and we have worked through our bucking issue. I take lessons and really like my instructor (not the same that trained this horse). My instructor said "he is smart, and does not bend well at all".

My point is that young horses go through phases. He is a doll one day and then spend three months being a nit wit. There are those one in a million horses that are able to be handled and ridden and never set a foot wrong. I met a horse that was a children's riding horse at age 4 because he loved kids and would never consider taking off with a kid on his back. He is worth is weight in gold, I have met/worked with around 1000 horses in my life so far. He is the only one I have met that was so tolerant and would be trusted with a young kid. So, if your horse is one in a million then you may be okay, but in most cases you are just in a good phase. I would work with a trainer and/or take lessons.

How long have you been riding?
     
    03-06-2013, 03:38 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shenee    


WOW!! You must of gone through alotÖ so are you suggesting I should Sell him and get another horse ? A more experienced horse? It would be soo hard.. iím soo attatched already

But you right your horse was gorgeous he is stunning :) did see some naughties in the vid :) but I loved the vid and the song he is soo beautiful! <3
I would suggest getting a trainer, someone that is willing to give you lessons on him as well as train on him abit for you. There is nothing wrong with wanting to keep this horse and "grow together" you just need professional guidance.
Skyseternalangel, Maple and rookie like this.
     
    03-07-2013, 03:04 PM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shenee    
Yeh I Completely understand what your saying but iím not sure what I should do weather everyone is giving me the advice to get another horse or what ? Iím really confused with what to do.. and as he is my first horse I have grown very attatched too him...
Nobody can tell you what to do - we're just random people online. What I think everybody would like to see is you get a good trainer, and have him somewhere that an experienced horse person can mold him into the horse you want him to be.

We all want you horse and yourself to be safe and for both of you to reach your full potential :)
     
    03-08-2013, 08:15 AM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple    
Nobody can tell you what to do - we're just random people online. What I think everybody would like to see is you get a good trainer, and have him somewhere that an experienced horse person can mold him into the horse you want him to be.

We all want you horse and yourself to be safe and for both of you to reach your full potential :)
yeh thanks heaps maple can you pls add me cheers!!
     

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