..::Leaving Legs Behind - Becoming Dangerous::...
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

..::Leaving Legs Behind - Becoming Dangerous::...

This is a discussion on ..::Leaving Legs Behind - Becoming Dangerous::... within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse leaves front legs behind jumping
  • Leaving legs behind

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-08-2008, 01:30 AM
  #1
Weanling
..::Leaving Legs Behind - Becoming Dangerous::...

Hey,

I didnt know whether to put this in the Jumping or Training thread, so I put it in the training thread...obvisiously. Now if anyone has a problem with the location of this post, please don't address it in the thread as a MOD will move it if nessicary. Thanks

Anyways...

Terry, our 5yo Thoroughbred Gelding is leaving his legs behind when jumping. Although when jumping a little-er height he jumps almost twice the size, however still not picking his front legs up. Its hard to explain, so I have some pictures.

This is a flatwork photo, as you can see he is quite balanced and coming along nicely etc.


Now for the Jumping. This is attempting to Jump a smaller Jump:



And now the dangerous looking heigher jump (around 1m) As you can see his front legs are underneath him rather up and under...



Training advice, excercises etc would be really awesome... thanks.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-08-2008, 11:46 AM
  #2
Started
Have you tried gymnastics (what we used to call a grid)? Jumping straight lines of 3 jumps with one stride or a bounce in between (you can mix that up). Put a ground pole one stride in front of the grid.

You are right, he is looking pretty dangerous right now...has he always been like this or did he start out decent and start getting worse over time?
     
    05-08-2008, 12:16 PM
  #3
Yearling
Yep, grids are your friend. There's only a bounce step in between so they have to really get snappy to make the jumps. You could start with three, but you are only limited by the number of jump standards you have.

He's still young at 5, how long have you been jumping with him? They need to figure it out themselves to pick those feet up. When you are schooling do you do lots of shoulders in and out? Does he do well at that? Have you had a chiro or MT look to see if he tight in his shoulder area?

By the way he is gorgeous!
     
    05-08-2008, 02:05 PM
  #4
Showing
Sara and G&K have made some excellent comments, I just thought I'd chuck my 2 cents in:
Some horses just simply don't jump well. I had a gelding who jumped exactly like your TB, and no matter how many exercises we did, he just did not improve. We wrote him off as a jumper, and focused on dressage, where he excelled.
Maybe your gelding is like that as well.
I would try grids, or moving the ground rail out a bit, and try what you can, but sometimes they just aren't jumpers. You can see with the first picture he's still hanging his legs; it's not as obvious as with the 1m jump, but it's definitely there.
Have you perhaps progressed him too quickly? That's the other thing in my mind, maybe he's simply not schooled well enough over smaller jumps to be able to know what to do with his front end over larger jumps?
     
    05-08-2008, 07:34 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Darn it, just wrote out the worlds longest post and accidently deleted it!

Anyways! Just to back up what everyone else said, gymnastics are your best friend! They are great for teaching a horse "how" to jump by picking up his legs, rocking back on his haunches, and rounding over the fence. If you choose to use them I'd start off smaller (like 18 in or 2 ft) until he gets the idea. Then you can move up and throw in some oxers.

Another idea is to trot over elevated rails or cavelletis. They're excellent for increasing flexibility, strengthening jumping muscles, and teaching them coordination and where to put their legs. I'd start of wtih about 5 (about 4 feet apart) and trot them both ways. Or if you have access to water trotting them through water gets the same workout only you don't have to worry about spacing out the poles!

I'm thinking at 5 years old it's just a training issue and he simply hasn't quite figured out how to use his body correctly. This is totally just me, but I would consider keeping him at smaller fences for a little bit until he gets better with his body. There's always the chance that he could lose his confidence over the bigger stuff if it's too hard for him to jump comfortably.
     
    05-09-2008, 12:38 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Sara and G&K have made some excellent comments, I just thought I'd chuck my 2 cents in:
Some horses just simply don't jump well. I had a gelding who jumped exactly like your tb, and no matter how many exercises we did, he just did not improve. We wrote him off as a jumper, and focused on dressage, where he excelled.
Maybe your gelding is like that as well.
I would try grids, or moving the ground rail out a bit, and try what you can, but sometimes they just aren't jumpers. You can see with the first picture he's still hanging his legs; it's not as obvious as with the 1m jump, but it's definitely there.
Have you perhaps progressed him too quickly? That's the other thing in my mind, maybe he's simply not schooled well enough over smaller jumps to be able to know what to do with his front end over larger jumps?
Thanks to all, very much

Just to comment on your post in particualr Just Dressage It.

I have to agree in some aspects about not every horse can excel in some disiplines etc. But him being a lengthy Thoroughbred, and only five, havnt really grown into his legs. He is very unbalanced. I do, think he has some sort of career in eventing. I love the idea about the three jumps in a row. I had a mental blank :roll: and I couldnt think of anything... anyhow hehe

Umm yeh, thanks heaps!
     
    05-09-2008, 11:23 AM
  #7
Showing
Okay! He is just 5, try taking things slower and do the exercises everyone else said, but I just wanted to let you know that some horses just simply aren't jumpers, and if you've exhausted all the training methods, maybe he just isn't meant to jump?
But that's down the road when you figure out whether or not he's fit to jump :)
     
    05-10-2008, 07:52 AM
  #8
Weanling
Thanks heaps
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0