Leg cues for turning
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Leg cues for turning

This is a discussion on Leg cues for turning within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to give leg cues for turning a horse

Like Tree10Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-04-2013, 07:01 PM
  #1
Yearling
Leg cues for turning

I've been thought that when you want the horse to turn you use your (inside) lower leg a little behind the girth and apply a little bit of pressure with the inside rein. When I ride Jasper(only about 12 rides on him so far) and ask him to turn, he thinks I want him to side pass. I've tried to make it as simple and clear as possible what I want him to do, but he doesn't bend(especially his head/neck), he just walks to the side and then eventually(after putting more pressure on the reins) sort of turns. Am I asking him to turn properly? Could it be something to do with conformation that makes it uncomfortable to bend his head/neck? I can post a picture of him if anyone needs me too.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-04-2013, 07:16 PM
  #2
Started
I have been taught this, and it seems to work pretty well:
If you want to turn right (for example) then you apply pressure with your left leg and also apply a little pressure with the right rein.

Horses move away from pressure - so I have always applied pressure from my outside leg and my horses seem to respond pretty well.

To me, when you add pressure with your inside leg - and it being back a little - and apply pressure with your inside rein at the same time, then to me I would be asking my horses to sidepass.
Critter sitter likes this.
     
    07-04-2013, 07:22 PM
  #3
Showing
Which way are you wanting to turn?

I usually use my outside leg to turn and if I have to use rein (my horse doesn't need rein) then I use an opening rein until he moves off of leg alone.
     
    07-04-2013, 07:23 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Its possible that you have your inside leg further behind the girth than you realize and he thinks you're asking him to move his quarters away from your leg rather than turn around your leg
A lot also depends on how tight a turn you want to make - just a shallow turn as in a change of rein across a large circle or a close turn around something like a cone. If you're riding a normal circle then your inside rein should be only slightly flexed in the direction you're moving in, your inside leg on the girth and your outside leg slightly behind it to stop the back end from wanting to swing outwards. At the same time you should still be asking your horse to move forwards and allowing him to go forwards by having a light hand that he's walking into
If he's side passing you might not be giving him enough rein to understand that he's supposed to be moving forwards
     
    07-04-2013, 07:35 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Which way are you wanting to turn?

I usually use my outside leg to turn and if I have to use rein (my horse doesn't need rein) then I use an opening rein until he moves off of leg alone.
Inside leg meaning that is the way I want to turn.

Hmm, I'm a bit confused... The trainer teaches every one at the barn I got to to use their inside leg when turning.
     
    07-04-2013, 07:44 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyAHorseOfCourse    
Inside leg meaning that is the way I want to turn.

Hmm, I'm a bit confused... The trainer teaches every one at the barn I got to to use their inside leg when turning.
I've never heard that.... I've always hear if you want to, say, turn Left, you use your outside (right) leg to push them that way. For the same reason as posted above... Horses move away from pressure. I don't even know how using the inside leg would be a clear cue to turn that direction. If anything I can totally see why he's confused and is trying to sidepass!
     
    07-04-2013, 07:57 PM
  #7
Foal
The way I turn isn't just using the leg. The position of the riders shoulders dictates where the horse puts his shoulders. So my turning aid is a combination of turning my shoulders, which in turn will naturally close the outside leg against the horse's body. My inside leg is quiet but still there to stop the horse from falling in. Reins are not for steering, my coach (dressage) kicks my backside if I turn using my reins!
Skyseternalangel and Herdof2 like this.
     
    07-04-2013, 08:07 PM
  #8
Yearling
I'm definitely going to change the way I use leg pressure for turning now! The trainer always said to use the inside leg, and to use it harder if the horse is not turning. I don't remember her telling me to use the outside leg at all when turning! I feel so stupid
     
    07-04-2013, 08:10 PM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyAHorseOfCourse    
I'm definitely going to change the way I use leg pressure for turning now! The trainer always said to use the inside leg, and to use it harder if the horse is not turning. I don't remember her telling me to use the outside leg at all when turning! I feel so stupid
:) Don't feel stupid. I didn't even know leg pressure was a thing until I started looking around on the horse forum. I was just like YEP, She turns when I pull on the reins- She's good to go! Haha

Does it makes sense why you use the outside leg? That's the biggest thing. Another example - when you're on the ground teaching a horse to, say, yield their hind end. You push them the way you want them to go. So then when you hop up in the saddle, and you touch their left side, they're going to want to go to the right - and the added rein cues are probably just confusing the horse! I could see why that could be taken as a sidepass cue.

Let us know how it goes using you outside leg :)
WhyAHorseOfCourse likes this.
     
    07-04-2013, 08:10 PM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyAHorseOfCourse    
Inside leg meaning that is the way I want to turn.

Hmm, I'm a bit confused... The trainer teaches every one at the barn I got to to use their inside leg when turning.
I don't see how inside leg tells a horse it's time to turn. That to me either means to either continue going forward or yield, which is why on a circle you have your outside leg just slightly back to ask for the horse to turn and also to keep the haunches from moving away from your inside leg, which reminds the horse to stay out on the circle and not come in via yielding from your inside leg.

But it's not just leg that initiates the turn. Your outside shoulder blade always leads, and your inside one comes back a bit.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
rein cues vs. leg cues? mydaughtersgroom Horse Riding 7 03-25-2014 04:51 PM
Turning and leg cues 23hejduk Horse Training 7 08-07-2012 11:10 AM
Leg Cues, the right way? Annanoel Horse Training 5 01-29-2012 01:39 PM
Anyone want to help me with leg cues? wishingforahorse Horse Riding 12 05-16-2011 01:33 PM
Leg Cues... Need to know which ones do what.... Velvetgrace Horse Training 7 09-09-2008 05:20 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0