Leg Pressure Questions??
   

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Leg Pressure Questions??

This is a discussion on Leg Pressure Questions?? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to explain leg pressure for horses
  • How do i know how much pressure to use on my horses side

 
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    01-30-2009, 02:45 PM
  #1
Foal
Red face Leg Pressure Questions??

Hi,
I would first like to start by saying that I am NOT a complete idiot and that I DO know somethings about horses and riding. But...

I read a lot on here and other sites about leg pressure and how and where to do it and which way it makes them turn and why...

I want some one to explain to me " As if I was 2 " about turning left (where my leg/foot should be, turning right, stopping.

When he gallops should I stand slightly?

I can ride a horse and stay on LOL but I want to make sure that if I am going to be doing this that I am doing it right.

I hope I don't sound like a complete bafoon.
     
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    01-30-2009, 03:19 PM
  #2
Weanling
I think it depends on the horse and how it was trained. I've had some instructors tell me that horses move into leg pressure, and others tell me that they move away from it.
     
    01-30-2009, 04:48 PM
  #3
Weanling
The horse should move off of your leg. You don't want the horse sitting on your leg. When stopping you should keep your legs relaxed and sink your weight down into your heels. When cantering its a preference wether to sit or be in two point, either one is perfectly fine for english. It probably would be beneficial for you to get some riding lessons to learn how to cue your horse properly.
     
    01-30-2009, 05:00 PM
  #4
Weanling
Lmao well... If you want to try and cling for dear life with your legs you can try sitting a gallop but it isn't all that pleasant.. I'd def. Recommend a half-seat/two-point position.. but if you're going from a standstill, do yourself a favor and grab mane. Also, stay as deep in your heels as you can. I always manage to lose a stirrup while galloping my QH and end up half standing half sitting his gallop... (Not that I can't 2pt without stirrups, its just a bit difficult when my horse is a being bit of a maniac and I'm already thrown a bit off balance)

If you don't lose your stirrups though, it's much nicer that way.
I don't know how much you know about riding and 2pt, so I'm going to tell you just incase to make sure you're leaning slightly forward with your hips back over the saddle at the 2pt and balanced over your heels.. You don't want to stand straight up in the stirrups as you'll most likely fall off. Especially at the gallop.

Example:
As... interesting as her "mount" may be.. she is in a pretty good position, although her shoulders/top half may be a tad far forward.
     
    01-30-2009, 07:48 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne0n Zero    
Lmao well... If you want to try and cling for dear life with your legs you can try sitting a gallop but it isn't all that pleasant.. I'd def. Recommend a half-seat/two-point position.. but if you're going from a standstill, do yourself a favor and grab mane. Also, stay as deep in your heels as you can. I always manage to lose a stirrup while galloping my QH and end up half standing half sitting his gallop... (Not that I can't 2pt without stirrups, its just a bit difficult when my horse is a being bit of a maniac and I'm already thrown a bit off balance)

If you don't lose your stirrups though, it's much nicer that way.
I don't know how much you know about riding and 2pt, so I'm going to tell you just incase to make sure you're leaning slightly forward with your hips back over the saddle at the 2pt and balanced over your heels.. You don't want to stand straight up in the stirrups as you'll most likely fall off. Especially at the gallop.

Example:
As... interesting as her "mount" may be.. she is in a pretty good position, although her shoulders/top half may be a tad far forward.

I read it as canter not necceraly gallop.
     
    01-30-2009, 08:37 PM
  #6
Foal
May I suggest that if you are not hand-galloping, jumping or trick riding you will want your legs to be in such a position that if the horse were to suddenly disappear, you would land standing and not on your butt. Balance needs to come from you core or lower abdomen, so as to keep the legs soft and responsive to the feel and movement of your horse. Let your legs lie on the sides of your horse like a wet dish rag, softly hugging the horse- no gripping.

The horse needs to taught to move away from the pressure of the leg. There are several ways to do it- both are easy and use rhythmic pressure. When training the horse to turn, whatever you do first is what the horse will eventually learn to use as a cue. Here is a sequence that I use to train my show horses
  • Look first where I want to go- only as signal
  • Use the outside rein next- only as a signal- do not force them with the outside rein
  • Softly bump them with the outside leg, increasing in pressure
  • Use the inside rein to achieve the turn.
  • When they achieve the turn reward by releasing all pressure
Do not be in a hurry- with enough repetitions your horse will be turning with just the look of your eye and will have learned to move away from pressure.


To teach the horse to move the hindquarters over so that you achieve a Turn on the forehand, here is a simple technique I use. It helps to have a training stick or dressage whip.
  • Sitting balanced and with the horse at a stand still I slide my right leg back 3-6 inches- no more or you risk losing your balance- press slightly- just as if you are pressing a button- you will not force the horse with your leg
  • Using you training stick, which you have taken the time to accustomed the horse to ON THE GROUND! Softly tap the horse's hindquarters on the same side
  • Slowly increase in pressure, of the tapping, until the horse moves the hip away
  • Reward the horse by releasing the leg and stop tapping
I am making one big assumption here- your horse is not afraid of training sticks! If so then take the time to get them over that fear, otherwise you risk injury to yourself or your horse!
www.successfulhorse.com
     
    01-31-2009, 04:58 AM
  #7
Kim
Foal
Don't worry about feeling stupid!! Unless I'm very much mistaken the whole point of this site is to ask questions, get and give advice and most of all learn!! You could be around horses your whole life and still learn something new! No one thinks you're a buffoon hun! Good luck with your training I hope it all goes well for you! :)
     
    01-31-2009, 06:43 AM
  #8
Green Broke
As others have said, our horses are all trained to move the hind quarters away from the pressure, so you get a nice, tight left turn by left leg, slightly back behind the cinch, to get the hind quarters to move right.

It's also a good training excercise to do this backing up around turns or obstacles....same method, by 'steering' the hind quarters away from your leg pressure.
     
    01-31-2009, 08:06 AM
  #9
Started
I've been taught that it's good to use a little bit of leg pressure when stopping to achieve a square halt (with all four feet aligned and "square"... probably more rectangular actually). Square halts are required for dressage tests, and it seems to me like they would be desireable in other disciplines, but you never know. Of course, your other stopping signals still need to be very clear.
     
    01-31-2009, 01:42 PM
  #10
Green Broke
My barn owner is trying to tell me that I need to use pressure/kick with my outside leg (this is my outside is the right and I want the horse to turn left), and pull with the inside rein (to completely turn around to the right). In my head this doesn't quite make sense because that means that the horse would be moving into my outside leg in order to turn. Is that right, or am I confused even more lol. I right now use the outside leg to push away the hindquarters and outside rein. The inside rein is just used for steering right, like to keep them going in that direction and not completely turning around?
     

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