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Lessons?

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        12-22-2008, 04:14 PM
      #11
    Zab
    Yearling
    Off topic.. but exactly what are the differenses between english and dressage to you people? :P
    Pretty much everything here is ''english dressage'' or ''jumping''... the words ''english riding'' is just what both jumping and dressage is.. there's no differense between riding english (with no jumping) and riding dressage. Except perhaps that if you don't call it dressage you're not interested in competitions, but the cues and riding is still pretty much the same.

    I can't agree with anebel.. but that might just be because it's different here.
         
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        12-22-2008, 04:26 PM
      #12
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zab    
    Off topic.. but exactly what are the differenses between english and dressage to you people? :P
    Pretty much everything here is ''english dressage'' or ''jumping''... the words ''english riding'' is just what both jumping and dressage is.. there's no differense between riding english (with no jumping) and riding dressage. Except perhaps that if you don't call it dressage you're not interested in competitions, but the cues and riding is still pretty much the same.

    I can't agree with anebel.. but that might just be because it's different here.
    Yes technically english IS jumping and dressage. This is not so in the lovely land of North America where idiots are allowed to run the horse world. Basically when you start riding there are these people with horses and english tack that give "english lessons". Pretty much you're chucked up on the horse and probably by your second week of riding you'll be cantering.
    After maybe 1 or 2 years of this "english riding" (if you've lived through it and still enjoy horses) then you'll split off and pick a discipline. From there you'll be put on a lunge line (finally!!), told that you have about 100 bad habits and spend the next 10 years of your life fixing them. Then when you've finally learned to ride semi-properly you can string together some semblance of a dressage test or jumping course.

    I figure why not skip the middle man and go straight to the dressage or jumping trainer who will teach you properly instead of nearly getting yourself killed with "english lessons" on a gren broke TB.
    The other option is to go with western riding where at least you'll learn proper horsemanship.
         
        12-22-2008, 04:40 PM
      #13
    Zab
    Yearling
    Ok.. it's somewhat the same here, except both bad and good trainers are just called english. It usually involves some jumping when they've learnt to find their balance and confidence, the specific dressage lessons doesn't do that. I think it's good to have some jumping too, makes it more allround. But of course not if the instructor forces them to when they don't want it, but again - it's bad instructors rather than a bad dicipline. And at least over here; thei're seen in all diciplines :)

    But it's stupid to pay for lessons on dangerous horses.
    The so called lessons I've enjoyed most in my first 12 years of riding was on crazy horses, no collection whatsoever and both trail rides, races and jumping. X) It wasn't for kids, and you wasn't forced to do anything you didn't want.

    What nearly killed my interest tho was when I had to walk and if I was lucky; trot, for two years. I didn't learn a thing and it was utterly boring :/ but it was supposed to be ''safe'' and ''teach us balance''...
         
        12-22-2008, 04:41 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Wow, what great replies - lots to think about! I've been doing some research and am finding that lessons in general can really range in price! So I guess we are a bit limited because we are on a budget.

    I know my daughter loves to ride in her english saddle so I may lean towards english lessons, but I won't limit myself completely to this. Another thought I had was that if we're interested in a person/stable I could go and watch a lesson to observe how they give their lessons and try to make sure it's someone we would be compatible with. For example we don't need super serious show type but we don't need the super laid back type either. (My daughters first few lessons (when she just turned 6 and way before we got a horse) were at a place that put the kids on some old, tired horses and let them go around and around. She didn't learn much there but she had fun.). I basically want her to correctly learn the basics and keep her confidence up.

    I wish money was not an issue (don't we all!) but I will do my best to make an educated choice that is in our budget.

    Thanks again for all of the great advice and keep it coming!!
         
        12-22-2008, 04:46 PM
      #15
    Zab
    Yearling
    Here seems to be a great lack of good teachers in this country, unless you want to take private lessons, which usually requires a horse of your own and it's still easy to get a bad trainer.
         
        12-22-2008, 04:49 PM
      #16
    Zab
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newhorsemom    
    Wow, what great replies - lots to think about! I've been doing some research and am finding that lessons in general can really range in price! So I guess we are a bit limited because we are on a budget.

    I know my daughter loves to ride in her english saddle so I may lean towards english lessons, but I won't limit myself completely to this. Another thought I had was that if we're interested in a person/stable I could go and watch a lesson to observe how they give their lessons and try to make sure it's someone we would be compatible with. For example we don't need super serious show type but we don't need the super laid back type either. (My daughters first few lessons (when she just turned 6 and way before we got a horse) were at a place that put the kids on some old, tired horses and let them go around and around. She didn't learn much there but she had fun.). I basically want her to correctly learn the basics and keep her confidence up.

    I wish money was not an issue (don't we all!) but I will do my best to make an educated choice that is in our budget.

    Thanks again for all of the great advice and keep it coming!!
    There are good trainers that's cheap and bad trainers that's expencive :) So it's not all about the money. Normally expencive trainers has won that or that show, but that doesn't mean they're good teachers. And then some trainers arn't that good at show riding, but are great teachers.

    It sounds like you have a good idea there :)
         
        12-22-2008, 06:46 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    As many have said, it's not the discipline that should be the biggest decision, it's the trainer! And of course, one man's "good trainer" is another man's "bad trainer."

    Newhorsemom, as you mentioned, I think it is a great idea to go observe your local trainers in their lessons. Nail down what you'd like your daughter to gain in her lessons (equitation instruction, horse care, experience with a variety of breeds/temperments, just fun, horse-people interaction, etc) and figure out how she best can gain those things! Take notes if you have a lot of trainers to choose from. Take your daughter with you (I'm sure she'd love to go!) and see her reactions to the things the rider does in the lesson. Is she bored by what they're doing after 15 minutes? Is she grinning ear-to-ear? Is she begging you to let her ride there?

    I know, when I take lessons, I want to learn proper show-type equitation, be very active with lots of variety, and have a strong trainer who makes decisions quick and motivates me (yeah, I'm cool with yelling to get my heels down!) On the other hand, it sounds like your daughter may want more of the fun horse stuff like learning to clip his ears and doing little patterns undersaddle (including learning safety and proper horsemanship) but without the MIL effect!

    Anebel, as I was reading your (rant) post about english trainers and beginning riders, I was thinking to myself, "what is she talking about? I never experienced anything like that!" Until...I got to the part about putting the rider on a green broke TB! Ha!! Yep, I remember those days! I was always a very confident rider, so I just thought it was fun! But I can imagine if a rider was unsure of their seat and was plopped on a 16hh TB 30 days off the track like I had been! I was always the guinea pig rider at one of the big lesson barns I rode at...any new lesson horse, I was the first one up! What fun for me!!
         
        12-22-2008, 08:31 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    I agree with anebel I have rode @ several diffrent barns with western , dressage,and english instructors.. english instructors have a tendency to be alittle harder driven and pushier in my experience but maybe you should ask your daughter what she prefers dressage would give her all the right equitation skills for just about anything she'd like to do later ..
         
        12-22-2008, 09:10 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Make sure you get a good trainer my trainer was bad never helped with your seat just say trot walk stop turn and sat on her fat butt.
    When I fond mark he had to take away by sturps and reins at the same time on champ he had me ride arond the riens uncliped losse in the indoor and on the lunge line but chump just was lassy and stad slow. Ya may think its crazy but it works
         
        12-22-2008, 09:15 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Equina - I was also a very confident "ride anything" person. Until I ended up in hospital multiple times for consussions, bone bruises and pulled muscles.
    For the past 10 years I have been sorting through terrible habits taught to me by the same instructors that nearly got me killed. Needless to say I think nothing of these "beginner's instructors".
    I highly suggest getting your daughter into a barn where safety and good management are enforced like law. Usually that is also where the "good coaches" are.
         

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