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Let's discuss FEEL.

This is a discussion on Let's discuss FEEL. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        12-28-2009, 12:00 PM
      #11
    Started
    Honeysuga

    As you know I am English - yet this is predominantly an American Forum. When writing as a guest, I must be careful not to cause, even unwittingly, offence. There are several versions of English and even Microsoft asks their customers to choose whether they want the American English version or the UK version. The US English version is more widely used partly because there are five Americans to every one Briton.
    Expressed in very simple terms there is the traditional example of: 'elevator'/US and 'lift'/UK - different words but same meaning. As an opposite, sometimes we use the same words but for different meanings.

    My Collins dictionary lists 11 versions of English in the preface and they don't include in that list American English - of which there is more than one version,

    Spoken English of any version is delivered along with intonation of the voice, facial expression, hand language, body language and facial language. Each of these facets of non verbal communication can change or even negate the meaning of the words spoken. Tom Dorrance’s words were recorded by his co-writer but obviously the non verbal communication was not recorded at the same time for the book. Dorrance made some of his points by inference and deduction rather than by spoken word. It is not always possible for me to read and accurately translate what he was saying. The Dorrance referred to in this thread is I believe his brother but no doubt they were brought up to speak the same version of American English.

    Writing to convey an exact meaning in horse terminology of a word like “feel” can be difficult, especially if it is a language used around the world and is to be universally understood.
    Actually I read Tom Dorrance regularly and I believe that largely I follow his philosophy of thinking in horsey matters.

    For me the English language both spoken and written, is a fascinating subject although French was traditionally used in days gone by Diplomats. It was believed that it was more accurate to use the French language in diplomacy rather than the English language, especially when a precise mutual understanding needed to be reached in any written agreement. Spoken English especially, of any version, is not an exact language.

    As a Briton I believe I understand what the American Dorrance is saying about “feel” but I am still not 100% sure. One thing I must quickly say - I meant no offence nor any slur and if what I wrote gave that impression to my American hosts, then I must apologise. But in doing so, perhaps I make my point.

    Barry G
         
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        12-28-2009, 12:22 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Feel=empathy!
         
        12-29-2009, 04:14 AM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
    Honeysuga

    As you know I am English - yet this is predominantly an American Forum. When writing as a guest, I must be careful not to cause, even unwittingly, offence. There are several versions of English and even Microsoft asks their customers to choose whether they want the American English version or the UK version. The US English version is more widely used partly because there are five Americans to every one Briton.
    Expressed in very simple terms there is the traditional example of: 'elevator'/US and 'lift'/UK - different words but same meaning. As an opposite, sometimes we use the same words but for different meanings.

    My Collins dictionary lists 11 versions of English in the preface and they don't include in that list American English - of which there is more than one version,

    Spoken English of any version is delivered along with intonation of the voice, facial expression, hand language, body language and facial language. Each of these facets of non verbal communication can change or even negate the meaning of the words spoken. Tom Dorrance’s words were recorded by his co-writer but obviously the non verbal communication was not recorded at the same time for the book. Dorrance made some of his points by inference and deduction rather than by spoken word. It is not always possible for me to read and accurately translate what he was saying. The Dorrance referred to in this thread is I believe his brother but no doubt they were brought up to speak the same version of American English.

    Writing to convey an exact meaning in horse terminology of a word like “feel” can be difficult, especially if it is a language used around the world and is to be universally understood.
    Actually I read Tom Dorrance regularly and I believe that largely I follow his philosophy of thinking in horsey matters.

    For me the English language both spoken and written, is a fascinating subject although French was traditionally used in days gone by Diplomats. It was believed that it was more accurate to use the French language in diplomacy rather than the English language, especially when a precise mutual understanding needed to be reached in any written agreement. Spoken English especially, of any version, is not an exact language.

    As a Briton I believe I understand what the American Dorrance is saying about “feel” but I am still not 100% sure. One thing I must quickly say - I meant no offence nor any slur and if what I wrote gave that impression to my American hosts, then I must apologize. But in doing so, perhaps I make my point.

    Barry G
    By no means did I feel you intended any offense at all. That line just piqued my interest and I was curious as to what you meant by it. Thank you for clarifying for me. I had no Idea your nationality actually... There are so many people of different nationalities on here one must never assume.
         
        12-29-2009, 09:05 AM
      #14
    Started
    Somehow these words of Pat Parelli fit in with Dorrance's words ( or should it be the other way round?)

    Quote
    "A horse doesn't care how much you know until he knows how much you care"

    Very touchy feelie that statement.

    B G
         
        12-29-2009, 01:25 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    I don't need a dictionary for this because I think "feel" has to do with a non-thinking connection. "Timing" and "amount of force" for example become non-issues, because you're there with the horse. I've had very good feel with a couple of my horses--- but not until I'd had them for years and years, and usually, the best feel came with old horses. Perhaps it was the horse having "feel" for me?
         

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