Longing Issues
 
 

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Longing Issues

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  • Longing horse on grass
  • Problems longing a horse

 
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    09-17-2010, 01:58 PM
  #1
Super Moderator
Longing Issues

I know I've posted this question before but I still need help...

I dont' longe Riley at home because he's quiet there and because I have a grass ring, so he just wants to eat and won't pay attention to me and my big scary whip, no matter how much I crack it.

At the shows he's a nut (when I longe). He runs towards me and kicks up in the air, sometimes he even pops rears while facing me. I've done the "shake of the longe rope" thing and it does sort-of work, but I don't think I'm doing it right. I don't stand in one place anymore, I sort of walk towards his rear I geuss? Trying to push him forward. When he comes towards me I shake or snap the longe line. I just bought a chain but haven't used it yet.

I get so nervous just thinking about longing him that my stomache hurts. Help please!!!!
     
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    09-17-2010, 02:08 PM
  #2
Weanling
Do you have access to a round pen? For horses that don't work well on longe line (i.e. They don't respect you with the rearing, etc that you speak of) its a good idea to work them in a round pen without a line on them.

The idea of longeing comes from the horse's natural herding instinct. In the wild, if a horse is not part of the herd, they will die on their own. They have a natural instinct to do anything they need to fit in with the herd. You need to assert your dominance just as the lead mare would do in the wild. By taking the line out of the equation, this will trigger your horse's natural instinct. They are now responsible for their own actions. If a horse gets out of sorts in the wild, the lead mare will drive them out of the herd (you simulate this same action in the round pen by driving the horse away from you).

A horse will quickly come to realize that they do not want to be driven away from you (the herd). Once you drive them away for a few minutes, you should be able to stop all movement and the horse should stop and face you. This shows respect. Eventually you will have the horse following you around like a puppy dog.

Depending on how dominant your horse is, this will take a few sessions. Once you have your horse's respect without a line, you should be able to add the line back in when in the round pen and then eventually in an open arena or other area and not have any issues.

This works wonders in all areas of the bond with your horse as it implements respect. You will notice a difference on the ground as well as in the saddle.

Let me know if you need any more details.
     
    09-17-2010, 02:09 PM
  #3
Showing
I bet I'll be bashed for the suggestion, but... My qh tried to do it to me one day on lunge (I was fast enough to jump off her way). SCARY! And those lead rope wiggles didn't work on her - she just ignored them definitely targeting on me. So next time I lunged her I had a "carrot stick" (or branch) - something rigid, without give - ready. When she charged at me trying to smash me on ground I got her with it on shoulder/neck. Didn't hurt her for sure, she is not afraid of carrot sticks, or whips, or me, but haven't tried her nasty trick since then.
     
    09-17-2010, 02:10 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
He's only bad at shows. I do have a round pen at home but again, it's grass covered so he would only be interested in grazing. At the shows round pens are not an option.... :(
     
    09-17-2010, 02:12 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
I bet I'll be bashed for the suggestion, but... My qh tried to do it to me one day on lunge (I was fast enough to jump off her way). SCARY! And those lead rope wiggles didn't work on her - she just ignored them definitely targeting on me. So next time I lunged her I had a "carrot stick" (or branch) - something rigid, without give - ready. When she charged at me trying to smash me on ground I got her with it on shoulder/neck. Didn't hurt her for sure, she is not afraid of carrot sticks, or whips, or me, but haven't tried her nasty trick since then.
That's actually what I did last night. I tried hard to longe him in the pooring rain because I'm stressing over the next show where I will have to longe him without my trainer. I had my longe whip and when he came towards me I waved it at him. Did not actually hit him but it was a very serious thought. I can not believe I am terrified to longe my own horse. A major part of my problem is that he's kind and gentle so when he acts like that, it's just not something I'm used to.
     
    09-17-2010, 02:13 PM
  #6
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
He's only bad at shows. I do have a round pen at home but again, it's grass covered so he would only be interested in grazing. At the shows round pens are not an option.... :(
That may be anxiety than displayed in such nasty way. Mine did it at home - not excited, not scared, just intentionally tried to get her foot on top. Is he OK when you just walk him on lead? And I know you work with the trainer, what he/she says?
     
    09-17-2010, 02:15 PM
  #7
Yearling
I would start at home and MAKE him go. I had a horse try to pull such a stunt once, the I'm Not Going To Move and You Can't Make Me. I cracked the whip across the meaty part of his hindquarters (after a half hour of asking with increasing firmness) and SCREAMED at him. You bet your buns he moved!

I lunged him aggressively, sudden lead changes, faster, slower, stop, go, stop, go. I did this for ten minuets and when I was done, he was begging to be asked nicely again. The next time I lunged him, he moved off on the first, gentle, request.

Just get out there, stick out your chest, and declare that YOU are the leader and HE WILL LISTEN. I also found for a stubborn horse, a plastic bag works wonders. With Sam (one I mentioned before) he was well trained and laughed at such things, so I got aggressive with him. I only had to do it once.

Don't beat your horse, but act like the cranky old lead mare. If you don't move, I'm going to bite you. If you still don't move, I'm presenting my rear end and I'm going to kick you clear back into yesterday.

If he tries to buck, charge, or kick, make him work even harder. Scream and shout and have an utter hissy fit. Make him horrible uncomfortable. If he turns those hindquarters towards you, smack them. Hard. If you back off when he says "I'm the boss" then your saying to him, "Sorry, right, your the boss" and he'll just keep getting worse.

Make your way the way of sunshine and butterflies, and make his way the way of sweating and lack of air
     
    09-17-2010, 02:16 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
He's only bad at shows. I do have a round pen at home but again, it's grass covered so he would only be interested in grazing. At the shows round pens are not an option.... :(
If you work him in the round pen at home, then you should see the results at the shows. Sure, he will be a little more preoccupied at the show vs at home, but you should still see a difference.

My suggestion would be to till up the ground in the round pen to limit his distraction of wanting to graze. Bring in anything you can to scare him away from you. I know this sounds bad, but you need to get a reaction out of him. If the longe whip isnt doing it, then maybe get a plastic bag and attach it to the end of the whip or an empty milk carton with some rocks in it and shake it. Something to get his attention and make him understand that you are now in charge and he is not going to be in your herd. You need to think like a horse in order to get through to him.

It works the same way with humans...lol. We always want what we can't have. Right now, he is calling the shots and telling you what he is and isnt going to do. If you take that option away from him, the only choice he will have is to beg you to let him back in :)
     
    09-17-2010, 02:22 PM
  #9
Started
I think twogeldings has it right. If your horse is not moving when you ask him to at home, he is not respecting your authority. If you don't have that at home, you won't have it at a show, either. Sometimes you have to get creative with a stubborn horse, and it sounds like you might need a creative solution for getting him to go.

Get him longeing at home, responding promptly to your cues. When you get to the show, make him move forward, hard, every time he acts like a jerk. Pretty soon, he'll figure out that acting that way means work and he'll stop.
     
    09-17-2010, 02:48 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
That may be anxiety than displayed in such nasty way. Mine did it at home - not excited, not scared, just intentionally tried to get her foot on top. Is he OK when you just walk him on lead? And I know you work with the trainer, what he/she says?
He's up at shows and so I get nervous on the ground, it's usually the first day. So if I haul in on Friday and get through all of the anxieties then the rest of the weekend is ok. I just have to get through that first blah. It's not every show either. Sometimes I can just pull him off the trailer and climb right on... other times... he's got energy.

My trainer says it's completely me. I'm not aggressive enough and he has no respect for me. At home it's all kissy-kissy love-love and when I need him to behave there is no fear/respect. I'm actually working on that....
     

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