Lounging
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Lounging

This is a discussion on Lounging within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse lounging
  • Horse isnt paying attention to me when we lounge

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-26-2011, 04:27 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy Lounging

So because I wasn't very happy with my horse for listening to me, I decided to lounge her, but when she gets into a gallop she starts to buck around. Is this because she's mad? Or just happy to be running??
She also doesn't stop when I say "whoa," she just keeps going... any tips on this??
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-26-2011, 08:18 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Cleffapuff,

I am wondering if you have anyone that can help you work with your horse on this? It would be so much more fun and productive if you had an experienced horse person helping you.

There's a lot more to lunging than most people realize. But to answer your question, your horse probably isn't mad. She might be emotional and expressing it by bucking. Might be just feeling happy to run, might have a sore back that is bothered by the saddle (pain will often cause bucking), might be scared of something you are doing with the whip. Lots of reason for bucking.

I usually don't worry too much about it if it's just a few expressive bucks. If the horse won't stop, I will stop them by flipping the line up into their jaw (giving it a big "wiggle" and flip) and saying stearnly, "whoaw! And keep snapping the line until the respond by slowing, and then ask again a bit nicer, see if they will slow and then stop. If not, flip the line good and hard. You must get her attention, and just aksing nicely might not do it. Do what it takes.
     
    07-26-2011, 08:30 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
Cleffapuff,

I am wondering if you have anyone that can help you work with your horse on this? It would be so much more fun and productive if you had an experienced horse person helping you.

There's a lot more to lunging than most people realize. But to answer your question, your horse probably isn't mad. She might be emotional and expressing it by bucking. Might be just feeling happy to run, might have a sore back that is bothered by the saddle (pain will often cause bucking), might be scared of something you are doing with the whip. Lots of reason for bucking.

I usually don't worry too much about it if it's just a few expressive bucks. If the horse won't stop, I will stop them by flipping the line up into their jaw (giving it a big "wiggle" and flip) and saying stearnly, "whoaw! And keep snapping the line until the respond by slowing, and then ask again a bit nicer, see if they will slow and then stop. If not, flip the line good and hard. You must get her attention, and just aksing nicely might not do it. Do what it takes.
Thank you so much! I'll look into that and try what you said!! :) I really appreciate it!
     
    07-26-2011, 09:39 PM
  #4
Showing
Does your horse know the basic vocal commands of walk, trot, canter, whoa ? If not.. teach them to her. It makes lunging a lot easier and a lot less stressful.

We have a horse at my work who just canters and canters and canters, bucking and playing and just ripping around the arena. She won't stop, unless you get a whip out, and unless you pretend the line is like your rein.. and do half halts, playing with her mouth (if she has a bit in)

If not.. second best option is to lunge in a rope halter since the knots act as pressure points.. generally better cues that asking in a nylon halter where it feels as though you're just pulling on their face.

Sometimes your horse just has a LOT of energy and would do better running around, as long as they don't get wild (panicky and scared and not paying attention to their feet.)

Also, if it's your first time lunging her, try working in a round pen. Not too small so you have your space.. and just let her run around on her own for a minute, sometimes that helps, and when she's settled, she'll prob try to grab a bite of grass and then you'll know she's ready to pay attention to you.
     
    07-26-2011, 09:49 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Does your horse know the basic vocal commands of walk, trot, canter, whoa ? If not.. teach them to her. It makes lunging a lot easier and a lot less stressful.

We have a horse at my work who just canters and canters and canters, bucking and playing and just ripping around the arena. She won't stop, unless you get a whip out, and unless you pretend the line is like your rein.. and do half halts, playing with her mouth (if she has a bit in)

If not.. second best option is to lunge in a rope halter since the knots act as pressure points.. generally better cues that asking in a nylon halter where it feels as though you're just pulling on their face.

Sometimes your horse just has a LOT of energy and would do better running around, as long as they don't get wild (panicky and scared and not paying attention to their feet.)

Also, if it's your first time lunging her, try working in a round pen. Not too small so you have your space.. and just let her run around on her own for a minute, sometimes that helps, and when she's settled, she'll prob try to grab a bite of grass and then you'll know she's ready to pay attention to you.
Yes she does.. I never thought to do that.. I would just take the whip out.. whoops.
She responds to kiss noises and such. That's how she was trained.
What if we don't have a round pen? Haha.
I'll try that next time thank you!
     
    07-27-2011, 11:22 PM
  #6
Showing
Well.. there are so many ways of doing things.. sometimes you even figure out your own way that works best for your horse.

Round pens are useful but any arena big enough for your horse to run freely and without getting into your space.. but small enough that there isn't an ocean between you and your horse. You can try a lunge line, but I'd say for the first few times.. try not to since it's so easy for a horse to get tangled up until you've practiced how to handle the line properly.

Hope I was helpful.
     
    07-28-2011, 08:24 AM
  #7
Green Broke
What equipment are you lunging (not Lounging BTW) your horse in? If it is just a halter and a lunge line attached, that is NOT a good way. If it is a halter and a lunge line with a chain on the end.. get rid of it.

To properly lunge a horse you need EITHER a lung cavesson OR you need a snaffle bridle with a thick mouth snaffle bit. You run the line from you to the ring of the bit, THROUGH the ring, up over the crown and then down to the bit on the other side and snap the lunge line to that. With this second arrangment you MUST stop the horse and change the arrangement to the OTHER side when you reverse directions.

When I start a horse lunging I use a cavesson with a lunging surcingle and side reins adjusted long (are loose with the horse standing quietly in a normal frame). The side reins only tight if the horse goes to drop his head below his knees but not so loose a foot can get over them. I stand opposite the horse's hip and keep the whip low and start the horse out in a walk, point the whip at the horse's hip. If you need him to move up, flick the whip (do not touch the horse with it). Most will move off. You need to form a triangle with you opposite the horse's hip to drive him forward. To slow him down you step ahead and get opposite the horse's shoulder and drop the whip so the tip touchse or almost touches the ground.

Level ground with good footing is essential and any time you can get an enclosure to work in, it is better. That being said, I rarely had the luxury of a proper enclosure and still got a lot out of lunging. You can give a horse a lot of great education lunging and ground driving if you learn how.
     
    07-28-2011, 08:55 AM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
lunging (not Lounging BTW)

I *think it can be spelled either way. It could be one of those color and colour things. I could swear that in the book Lessons with Lendon by Lendon Gray it says "lounging" instead of lunging. I could be completely off my rocker though.
     
    07-28-2011, 11:09 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
What equipment are you lunging (not Lounging BTW) your horse in? If it is just a halter and a lunge line attached, that is NOT a good way. If it is a halter and a lunge line with a chain on the end.. get rid of it.

To properly lunge a horse you need EITHER a lung cavesson OR you need a snaffle bridle with a thick mouth snaffle bit. You run the line from you to the ring of the bit, THROUGH the ring, up over the crown and then down to the bit on the other side and snap the lunge line to that. With this second arrangment you MUST stop the horse and change the arrangement to the OTHER side when you reverse directions.

When I start a horse lunging I use a cavesson with a lunging surcingle and side reins adjusted long (are loose with the horse standing quietly in a normal frame). The side reins only tight if the horse goes to drop his head below his knees but not so loose a foot can get over them. I stand opposite the horse's hip and keep the whip low and start the horse out in a walk, point the whip at the horse's hip. If you need him to move up, flick the whip (do not touch the horse with it). Most will move off. You need to form a triangle with you opposite the horse's hip to drive him forward. To slow him down you step ahead and get opposite the horse's shoulder and drop the whip so the tip touchse or almost touches the ground.

Level ground with good footing is essential and any time you can get an enclosure to work in, it is better. That being said, I rarely had the luxury of a proper enclosure and still got a lot out of lunging. You can give a horse a lot of great education lunging and ground driving if you learn how.
Ok... but I can't get that close to my horse with a whip.
And yes all I use is a halter.. but I don't really have the money to invest in a cavesson... so I'm not sure what I should do.
     
    07-28-2011, 11:44 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Put a snaffle bridle on your horse and run the line thru the bit and over the crown (behind the ears) and snap it in the ring on the opposite side.

If you cannot get close to your horse with a whip you need to take a giant step back and look at the Tellington Jones T-Touch methods or other methods and start to desensitize your horse. IOW's you need to go back to basic ground work and teach your horse that it is OK to be touched and handled all over. In some circles it is referred to as sacking out. I have used both methods.

A horse should respect a whip but not be afraid of it. Most horses are afraid of whips.

It sounds to me like your horse is lacking a lot of basic work. Do that. Don't worry about riding.. worry about training your horse to relax with you on the ground first. This is very important training.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lounging? Nope. Longing? Still no... what then? leonalee Horse Training 37 12-24-2010 02:54 PM
Lounging laiken Horse Training 10 06-09-2010 06:31 PM
Help with ground/lounging work Klassic Superstar Horse Training 2 01-12-2010 03:50 PM
free jumping/lounging help chika1235 Horse Training 4 12-12-2009 05:39 PM
lounging a yearling? Starryeyed Horse Health 4 04-27-2009 01:34 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0