Lunging?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Lunging?

This is a discussion on Lunging? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • When lunging a horse at linerty should they turn in or out when changing direction?
  • How to train a horse at liberty

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Cherie

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-06-2012, 03:21 PM
  #1
Foal
Lunging?

I typically just put my horse in the round pen and let him just run out any excess energy he might have built up on the days that I don't ride him. But the shows I go to, usually don't have a round pen to do that. So I've began training him to lunge. I've trained two other horses how to lunge but I've never had to deal with the issue that presents itself to me with him. He is responsive with the cues I give him for walk, trot, canter, slow. But he has the issue of changing direction by turning away from me, So then the lunge line is on the opposite side of his head, which makes it come up over his neck. Which of course, is a dangerous situation.

On some days he will change direction out of no where while he's cantering or trotting, and just take off in the other direction. I don't mind if he's turning IN and changing, but he turns toward the outside.

So as of late I've just been putting him on the lunge and having him walk in circles. If he starts acting stupid, then I make him move his feet. Is this a good way to get him out of the habit? Some other way?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-06-2012, 03:43 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
He should never change directions without you telling him to. Every move he makes on the longe line should be asked for by you.

To me longing is totally counter-productive if it is not an exercise is obedience. Shorten up your longe line until you have perfect control at a closer distance. If he just starts to turn away from you, pull him around hard and discipline him by jerking the longe line, stopping him and starting him over.

I don't know what voice commands you are using, but I would highly suggest you do not use "walk" , "trot" and "canter". If you plan on showing a horse, you do not want it to ever respond to the announcer calling out transitions. Many horses learn this any way, especially if their rider makes transitions very quickly after the announcer. This is why many riders ride on 2 or 3 strides after the announcer speaks.
Foxhunter likes this.
     
    05-06-2012, 04:07 PM
  #3
Trained
Great post cherie

OP are you making sure to stay behind his drive line ? If I step in front of my horses shoulder she will stop or turn around. If I stay behind her shoulder in a neutral or driving position she will keep going forward.
     
    05-06-2012, 04:25 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
He should never change directions without you telling him to. Every move he makes on the longe line should be asked for by you.

To me longing is totally counter-productive if it is not an exercise is obedience. Shorten up your longe line until you have perfect control at a closer distance. If he just starts to turn away from you, pull him around hard and discipline him by jerking the longe line, stopping him and starting him over.

I don't know what voice commands you are using, but I would highly suggest you do not use "walk" , "trot" and "canter". If you plan on showing a horse, you do not want it to ever respond to the announcer calling out transitions. Many horses learn this any way, especially if their rider makes transitions very quickly after the announcer. This is why many riders ride on 2 or 3 strides after the announcer speaks.
Took the words straight outta my mouth, lol. Similarly I never throw a horse into a round-pin and let in run at liberty. I doubt they even have liberty horses, do that lol. Every interaction you make with your horse influences it's trainable mind. Remember that using vague or random commands (or even worse, a mixture of the two) can have serious backwards progress with its training. Your physical language must be confident at all times, and when you execute a command you must have the full force of your intention behind it. This is why working with a trainer would probably be the most productive thing for you. That way you can learn to read your horses body language better and work your horse up for success by giving him straight and direct commands on the lounge. The lounge lesson is never just 10 minutes of having your horse run in two different directions, its a chance for your horse and you to work on reading each others body language and responding to yields. This is followed up by conditioning in a certain discipline further down the road, however every lounge lesson begins the same: with communication.

Having your horse on a shorter line (a smaller circle) will give you more "contact" or "leverage" with communicating commands. Especially if the horse is green or hot-blooded in any way. Always stand at the apex of the triangle (right at their belly or "center") and drive your horse forward. Forward motion is everything, its the answer to most under-saddle problems too. If he tries to "wiggle" (demonstrate bad behavior on the lounge) then crack the lounge whip (This is not animated at all! The whip is held low by his hind legs and is cracked with a quick flick of the wrist. You will hear a distinct "cracking" sound when executed properly.) and send him forward. Eventually he will realize what you want from him is to focus on your body language and drive forward on the lounge. When you ask for a halt, stop movement with your body, if your horse does not slow then close your fingers on the line and give slight tension. Do not pull back harshly unless the horse is breaking through you. If the horse for example continues at the canter or speeds into a run, then first display a stotic and firm body language, followed by small half halts in the line (tension), if the horse still ignores you after you asked twice, then give him a yank and make it count. This is not a half-hearted pull, its an all out "I want you to stop NOW!" yank. Most horses will immediately slow or stop and most likely face you, and in this case return to your safe zone at it's center, and send them forward again; repeating the exercise until they lesson to the subtle cues you are making.

Hope that helps :)
     

Tags
lunging, thoroughbred, training, young horse

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lunging help horse lover 114 Horse Training 22 01-01-2012 02:34 AM
Question about Lunging/Free Lunging RidingTowardsGrace Horse Training 5 12-28-2010 11:58 PM
Retraining proper lunging? Or better yet correcting bad lunging habits? CookieHorseGirl Horse Training 5 12-09-2009 05:53 PM
Line lunging vs. free lunging AussieDaisyGirl Horse Training 13 09-13-2009 09:53 PM
lunging help . chazzix Horse Training 6 04-14-2009 04:00 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0