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Lunging.

This is a discussion on Lunging. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        02-12-2010, 09:52 AM
      #11
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    unless the horse wants to run off then you can refer to the pictures above to see what happens. If you can control the horses nose you can control the whole body.
    The horse is running off because been taught it can.

    What I am saying is not everyone needs to run out and buy special equipment for every problem. In this case, a chain would work too. Run the chain from the ring on the opposite jowl piece, through the side ring, over the nose and through the ring on the near side. The head will stay down and the nose can be tipped in. But chains are not for people who can't give and take pressure instantly.
         
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        02-12-2010, 10:29 AM
      #12
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    I will disagree. A correctly fitted halter will work very well
    It can't possibly since you're comparing apples to oranges. Halter = loose = inconsistent pressure points. Cavesson = snug = consistent pressure point.
         
        02-12-2010, 10:31 AM
      #13
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    I would work on leading. I know you think he leads fine and the problem is on the lunge but he needs help leading.
    Insert *thumbs up* emoticon here.

    Totally agree, and excellent point to bring up. The horse does also have a leading problem.
         
        02-12-2010, 10:38 AM
      #14
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    In this case, a chain would work too. Run the chain from the ring on the opposite jowl piece, through the side ring, over the nose and through the ring on the near side. The head will stay down and the nose can be tipped in. But chains are not for people who can't give and take pressure instantly.
    A chain?

    When you give advice it really needs to fit the person and their abilities. To give this advice and then disclaimer it with your last sentence is silly. Clearly the OP doesn't know when to give and take or she wouldn't be in the situation she's in now.
         
        02-12-2010, 10:39 AM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    The horse is running off because been taught it can.

    What I am saying is not everyone needs to run out and buy special equipment for every problem. In this case, a chain would work too. Run the chain from the ring on the opposite jowl piece, through the side ring, over the nose and through the ring on the near side. The head will stay down and the nose can be tipped in. But chains are not for people who can't give and take pressure instantly.

    So you really just wanted to start an arguement on this thread also. Chains are not for people who want to use horsemanship rather than pain and force. If you need to buy a lungeing cavesson to keep your horses nose tipped in then do so. Don't be more forceful with your horse than you need to be just to save money.
         
        02-12-2010, 10:43 AM
      #16
    Banned
    Something else that no one has pointed out.....

    In a post on the first page, the OP stated she lunges him in boots, a halter, and with a lunge line and nothing else. In the photos she posted, he was fully tacked up. Perhaps her skills or lack therof on how to lunge a horse are irrelevant. Her saddle might be too far back, may not fit, or she may not have tightened the girth enough, which would cause slippage, etc.
         
        02-12-2010, 04:35 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justsambam08    
    Something else that no one has pointed out.....

    In a post on the first page, the OP stated she lunges him in boots, a halter, and with a lunge line and nothing else. In the photos she posted, he was fully tacked up. Perhaps her skills or lack therof on how to lunge a horse are irrelevant. Her saddle might be too far back, may not fit, or she may not have tightened the girth enough, which would cause slippage, etc.
    I'm still reading threw everything but I got his saddle/back checked in January and it was perfect, the saddle was placed right and the girth was tight enough. I lunged him after I rode and I asked him to WALK on the lunge to cool off. I know my skills of lunging are fine, because I've lunged 2 year olds to old school masters and both my instructors have taught me the same way. I'm gong to ask Aamelia to lunge him next lesson in case I am doing something wrong.
         
        02-12-2010, 04:39 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mercedes    
    He's not scared. He's just got your number. He knows you can't make him. He knows you can't hold him.

    1. More turnout. If a horse has that kind of energy to burn, they need to have more time to run and play to blow it off BEFORE any kind of work can begin. He also looks to be in very good weight, so I wonder if an adjustment to his concentrates isn't also in order.

    2. Enclosed area. Once they learn they can leave whenever they want, you're stuck. Work him someplace, where if he does get loose, he can't go far.

    3. Longeing Cavesson. You have no control longeing in a halter. They can whip the head around and they are gone. A longeing cavesson applies pressure to the sensitive nose. A horse hits the end of that and they'll usually think twice about trying it again. The term is called 'leverage', and right now, you've got none and he knows it.

    4. Wait for experienced help. You're in over your head at this point and a habit is being created that becomes infinitely more difficult to correct the more times it is allowed to happen.

    5. Research. I'm not entirely convinced you do know how to longe, or that you've been taught properly...per the outcome with this horse. So grab a book on longeing and start learning on your own, so you can identify if the person teaching you firsthand knows what they are doing.
    1. He gets all day to do this and spends it on five acers, so his got enough room/time.

    2. I'm trying to get it, but at this time it is not possible. If this means not lunging him for a while then sure I'm all for it.

    4. As I wrote below, I will be getting my instructor to lunge him for me next lesson.
         
        02-12-2010, 04:49 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    I would work on leading. I know you think he leads fine and the problem is on the lunge but he needs help leading. I would start with getting him to lower his head . Put one hand on his poll and one hand where the lead attaches to the halter. Don't pull just let themsit there untill the horse moves his head down and then release your hands. When you can position his head anywhere you want then move on to moving his feet. Using as little pressure as possible get him to move one front foot forward one step and only one step. You will have to move his head to the left so he can shift his wieght and move the right foot and vice versa. You should be able to move only one foot forward and backward without taking the slack out of the lead. Then you can teach him to yield his hindquarters a little better making sure that he is crossing in front of the outside leg.

    What this will do is get him to move with your feel and he won't need to go bucking off when you try to lunge him. If he does need to run off you need to see him getting ready and disengage his hindquarters and change his mind. I would not be real gentle about it.
    I understand what you are saying but his general leading is perfect, this is because when I first got him I did lots of leading work with him and led him everywhere. He follows/walks beside me with his head low. I can get him to back up, circle, halt, side step, ect.
         
        02-12-2010, 04:56 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Indyhorse    
    I agree with Payton (and Mercedes) get him in a round pen to work. Working on a line in an big open space like that invites him to cause trouble when he already knows he can get out of your hands. It's not doing him any good to lunge under those circumstances - it's just perpetuating the problem.

    Thanks, I'm not going to lunge him until I can get a round pen/ smaller area. When I do get to lunge him, I might jump on him and get dad to lunge him (dad does know how to lunge). I've had people on him on the lunge and he goes well (just a thought).
         

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