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Lunging bitless

This is a discussion on Lunging bitless within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        01-04-2014, 04:36 AM
      #31
    Super Moderator
    You NEVER lunge in a chain.
    loosie, beau159 and Yogiwick like this.
         
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        01-04-2014, 04:46 AM
      #32
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Yogiwick    
    I have never heard of a rope halter with a stud chain.. Isn't a rope halter already the same concept as a stud chain?
    Not in the least! A rope halter is a... halter. A stud chain is just a punishment tool. I would liken it more to a bit than a halter.

    I personally use rope halters because they're strong, no hardware to rust or break, they're light and you can just chuck em in the wash when they're dirty.

    I will not use a rope halter to tie firm, unless the horse is already very well trained. I will not tie firm in a trailer or anywhere unsafe, as it's likely something else will break before the halter. I will not leave a rope halter on a horse unattended, unless there's a 'safety break' in the form of a balers twine loop to tie it, for eg.(not that I leave horses haltered when loose anyway). I will not use a rope halter low on the nose. I will not use a rope halter with extra knots on nose or poll.
         
        01-04-2014, 04:54 AM
      #33
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SEAmom    
    Oh, man! I definitely missed that one. That was supposed to be "pulling", but I have certainly gotten awfully dizzy many times. Lol.
    Gathered what you meant... but if you're getting dizzy, you should have been told it's the horse that's meant to be doing the circling!
         
        01-04-2014, 05:00 AM
      #34
    Super Moderator
    I get dizzy too, sometimes.
         
        01-04-2014, 05:09 AM
      #35
    Foal
    You should pay less attention to the equipment and more to the horse. I would reccomend to slow down a little bit - your horse can have some issues with working on the lung in open space or he can simply push against the lunge to find some balance to help him make the transition. You could work on the transitions under saddle and in the round pen, and in your place I'd try to walk the circle with your horse when you're lunging - just like leading him on a longer rope on a distance - that should help you to work better with the leadrope (not aloowing the horse to push agaist it) and if YOU make the transition with your horse (I mean you start "trotting" next to him) it will help him to improve the transitions definitely. It seems like a small detail but once the horse can read the speech of your body and he sees the transition coming it really helps a lot.


    And... sorry for the grammar mistakes :), I'm Czech and my English is really not the best.
         
        01-04-2014, 07:47 AM
      #36
    Yearling
    I honestly don't understand what some people mean when they say a horse won't pull. I understand that horses can't lean unless you give them something to lean on (that could be the bit or the halter).

    But, she can't very well give him slack to prevent him from pulling if he's running straight out of the circle.

    I'll also add that I use both rope and nylon web halters. I only tie with nylon though, and I never tie solid. A rope halter is just more convenient, I don't like the weight of a metal clip, and they're easier to wash. Just like nearly EVERYTHING in the horse world, they can cause pain in the wrong hands, just like a bit, crop, spurs, or a hackamore. They aren't the least bit painful unless someone pulls hard (horse or handler). Nylon web halters are easier to lean on, and bronc bands are even worse. A rope halter will encourage the horse to not lean.

    Anyway, to the OP- I wouldn't lunge in a bit. I would stick with a halter, nylon or rope won't matter. Here's what I would do:
    1.) If he doesn't already flex, teach him to. Stand at his girth and pick up the lead with two fingers and bring it up towards his withers. You want him to really try to get to his girth line. If he doesn't flex within a few seconds of the cue then bump, bump, bump until he does. And I don't mean to rip his head off, just a bump. Practice this on both sides. Eventually he'll learn to flex on a feel (meaning when you pick up the lead, he'll flex with little pressure.) This is a Clinton Anderson method, although I'm sure plenty of trainers do it, so maybe you can find a video.
    2.) I would do yielding exercises. If he doesn't already, train him to yield his hindquarters and forequarters. There's tons of information on how to teach that.
    3.) Once he is yielding pretty well, start doing sending exercises. I'd start by standing about ten feet away from a fence and sending him between the fence and yourself. Once his drive line is past you, cue him to yield his hindquarters. At first he may rush through, but he'll learn to go through slow and relaxed. Start out at a walk. Then close the space between the fence and yourself a bit and repeat.
    4.) Once he has that down (meaning he's soft and doesn't pull you) move on to lunging. I would try to lunge with a line, but in the round pen at first. Start slow. When you change directions in the round pen, does he turn into you in to the fence? If he's into the fence don't allow that. Does he seem to be paying attention to you? (i.e. One ear to you, head tipped your direction) or is he looking out of the pen? If he isn't focused on you change directions, or ask for a downward transition. The more direction changes and transitions you ask for the more
    focused he's going to be.
    5.) Now start lunging outside. Again, START SLOW. Try using a corner or something as an aid, too. Begin in a smaller circle at a walk. Ask for a stop/direction change every now and then. Then try a larger circle at a walk, then add a trot if he's doing well. Then eventually a lope/canter. You should be able to lunge him without using a corner before too long.

    If he tries pulling don't pull back. Bump him. If he isn't doing well with a step try going back to the previous step, or if you just added speed go down a gait. Obviously, Rome wasn't built in a day and this method will take a little time.

    I'm not a trainer, but this has worked with horses I've had. Good luck and I hope I helped.

    *Sorry for any typing errors, I'm on my smartphone*
    Posted via Mobile Device
    anndankev likes this.
         
        01-04-2014, 08:10 AM
      #37
    Yearling
    Gaining Respect and Control On The Ground - Series I - YouTube

    1.) #7
    2.) #3 and #5
    3.) #8
    4&5.) #3
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        01-04-2014, 08:15 AM
      #38
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spirit88    
    The only halters I own are rope halters have one regular one never use it. Never will use a regular halter either.

    For most part I don't even need a halter just a rope around their neck so I don't need it for control my horses are very responsive. Can lead all 3 horses just by putting my hand under their chin no halter needed..
    So you tie and trailer etc…..in a rope halter? Or are they loose in the trailer?

    I also would never tie hard or leave unattended in a rope halter…..I use it as a training tool. Sometimes a nylon halter just does not get the message across.

    I think there are different things people think of when someone says "stud chain" and perhaps that is some of the confusion? Some think it is a chain on the upper gums, some think it is a chain over the nose or under the chin.
    loosie and Yogiwick like this.
         
        01-04-2014, 10:39 PM
      #39
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Not in the least! A rope halter is a... halter. A stud chain is just a punishment tool. I would liken it more to a bit than a halter.

    I personally use rope halters because they're strong, no hardware to rust or break, they're light and you can just chuck em in the wash when they're dirty.

    I will not use a rope halter to tie firm, unless the horse is already very well trained. I will not tie firm in a trailer or anywhere unsafe, as it's likely something else will break before the halter. I will not leave a rope halter on a horse unattended, unless there's a 'safety break' in the form of a balers twine loop to tie it, for eg.(not that I leave horses haltered when loose anyway). I will not use a rope halter low on the nose. I will not use a rope halter with extra knots on nose or poll.
    I feel a rope halter was designed more as a training tool than a day to day item (though it is often used as such). The purpose of the rope halter it to "bite" in the right places. It applied pressure to a thin line on the nose as does a stud chain. While obviously different I see similarities in design and usage. Having a rope halter with a stud chain is somewhat cruel imo, you already have something to bite into their nose, why use something else to do the same thing? It's not like you can wrap it around the halter, since you will be having the same bite since the halter is just as thin.
         
        01-04-2014, 10:41 PM
      #40
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by franknbeans    
    So you tie and trailer etc…..in a rope halter? Or are they loose in the trailer?

    I also would never tie hard or leave unattended in a rope halter…..I use it as a training tool. Sometimes a nylon halter just does not get the message across.

    I think there are different things people think of when someone says "stud chain" and perhaps that is some of the confusion? Some think it is a chain on the upper gums, some think it is a chain over the nose or under the chin.
    A stud chain is a chain. You can put it over the nose/under the nose/over gums/through mouth whatever. It's the same thing. How you use it varies.
    loosie likes this.
         

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