Lunging Cash for the first time ...good grief!!(Sorry little long) - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Lunging Cash for the first time ...good grief!!(Sorry little long)

This is a discussion on Lunging Cash for the first time ...good grief!!(Sorry little long) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • My horse wont go out on the lunge line he tries to stay next to me
  • Teaching a horse to go out on the lunge line first time

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-14-2012, 07:58 PM
  #11
Weanling
That is a wonderful idea !! I got lots of stuff I could get him to step over ! I never thought of that !!Will that really help with trust ? I still got some light out for about an hour..I am going to go and try that and maybe that will build both of our confidence and trust levels up !! (This is why I love this website!)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-14-2012, 08:49 PM
  #12
nyx
Weanling
It will help build a bond and trust yes. :) even going through some bending poles or round a barrel circuit, goodluck and let us know how you go. :)
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    06-14-2012, 09:03 PM
  #13
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calming Melody    
No I wasn't using a rope halter but have been looking around to get one , I was told they were good for training . I have had him for a month and haven't been working him and I thought he had been here long enough to try . I was using the lunge whip to guide him to go forward but it was like he was more worried about everything else that what I was wanting him to do .

This. He was more worried about everything else. He never gave you more than half his brain. The other half was back in the pasture. The point of lunging is not that he go around you, but that he go around you, paying attention to you. If he is doing all this stuff, then you need to wake him up and get him to having both eyes on you when stopped and when moving, one ear on you and moving up when say up and down when you say down.

Don't let him back into the pasture until you sense some kind of change in his demeanor, some kind of "release " of his tension and his outward focus.

Means, you need to get tougher and stay more focussed . Don't let his distraction to those buddies next door draw you away from your requests to him, not for a second. Stay right in the present and get him moving!
     
    06-14-2012, 09:08 PM
  #14
Super Moderator
Truthfully, it sounds to me like you handled the situation pretty well. I also suggest a rope halter. They are "magical" in my opinion. The pressure points help give you more control and are actually less damaging that a chain.

I had a lot of issues lunging as well. My horse was (and sometimes is) very disrespectful on the lunge line. I went to a Clinton Anderson trainer and he really helped me alot. I like to watch his videos because they can be very helpful...
     
    06-14-2012, 09:15 PM
  #15
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyx    
You need to work him in close to you so you can control his head, when he come in simply grab his halter and push him out. You should be able to lunge at a walk and trot on just a lead rope and a dressage whip. Always ask for walk first get him calm and then ask for trot when he plays up tries to bolt pull his head in and stop him.. Stand him still for a moment to think about it then start the process again asking for a calm walk. If he trot with out you ask him stop him straight away and start again. Practise this untill he gets the picture. But before any lunging I suggest you push him around a bit, back him up like get him moving his feet fast, he should be backing up while your walking in so you need to use a bit of force, get him turning tight circles ie you walk at his hindquaters and keep his head close, when he over takes you stop pat him and let him think.

You could try the join up method but unless you know what your doing I seen it go wrong too easy.

Good luck!
Posted via Mobile Device

I disagree with quite a lot of this.

I would not want my horse to come into me in the lunging so close that to turn him out I grab his halter. If he comes in that close (without me asking), he has broken the rules. I will stop him when he is absolutely no closer than the longest lenght of my arm. The shear act of disallwoing hinm to come up onto me is a demonstration of your leadership and puts him in a place of "mother may I" if he wishes to approach.


If the horse doesn't know how to lunge with you, I might not go to making him stop every time he gets a bit too fast or actus up. I might give him a few quick jerks on the line to tell him to "knock it off!" but I wont bring him back to a full stop, then start again. NOt every time. To start off, if he gets a bit excited, I am inclined to let him go for a bit. He will soon find how tiring it is, and how hard to maintain his balance on a small circle.
ONce he is better at lunging, then I would agree that each time he starts off too fast, bring him back to a walk and start again.

You see, in your case, your horse keeps stopping and trying to avoid going forward, so for you to stop him will only make this whole process get all chopped up into lots of little starts and stops and then who is really controlling that situation? You need him to move FORWARD above all. If it's a bit too fast at first, that does not really matter, for the time being.

And lastly, I would never have a horse turn cirlces so that his head is comeing around into me. Yes, some people like to move the hind quarters away from them. Cool . But I also see them pull the head around onto themselves and I personally think this is not good.

In any case, you really need a visual example to mimic. Eitehr have some one help you or access some good videos. I like Julie Goodnight, who has some great videos . They are not free, but are not outrageously expensive, either. And she really explains clearly and she is firm but not aggressive.
     
    06-14-2012, 09:16 PM
  #16
Weanling
Well , I got Cash and walked him around in the pasture and we stepped over a different variety of logs , sizes and lengths. He did really well I think ! The only problem we had was going over the biggest log in the field that was next to 2 others...He kinda stopped but I rubbed his neck told him it was ok and I stepped over and tugged a little and he went right over it ! I gave him some love and told him he did good and than I kinda just would walk backwards in the pasture and would have him follow, would tell him to stop (he would stop) than I would walk a little ways and would motion for him to come (he would come) than I would put my hand up and tell him to stop and he did ...we did this for about 15-20 minutes . I had tried to take the lead off of him and see if he would do it without it and he wouldn't he would just stand there and look at me . I just put the lead on it worked it some more. This time when I would notice him paying attenting to something else I would bring his attention right back to me and he also had his ears straight up (think that means he is alert and focused??) He did really good with stop and go ...maybe lunging isn't his thing ? Oh and at the end of all of it I gave him a treat ! He was totally different with me in the field on the lead than with the lunging . ( Oh ya and I also made him spin around from the left and right side a few times)
     
    06-14-2012, 09:18 PM
  #17
nyx
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
truthfully, it sounds to me like you handled the situation pretty well. I also suggest a rope halter. They are "magical" in my opinion. The pressure points help give you more control and are actually less damaging that a chain.
I agree. :) especially those with the 6ft or 12ft lead attached.they are great for lunging in close and ground work.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    06-14-2012, 09:21 PM
  #18
nyx
Weanling
That sounds great! :) don't give up on the lunging though.. Alot of problems with riding can also be relfected in groundwork/lunging.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    06-14-2012, 09:22 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyx    
I agree. :) especially those with the 6ft or 12ft lead attached.they are great for lunging in close and ground work.
Posted via Mobile Device
I have several leads that are 6 ft and 10 ft , but the lunge line is like 25 I do believe ...it was a little more hard to handle than just a lead rope in my opinion! I will def be checking out videos and seeing how it goes ...but I wonder if he just doesn't know how? So I think I will look for a video on teaching a horse how to lunge lol! I want to have a good relationship with my horses and be friends and all but I want them to listen to me above anything else !
     
    06-14-2012, 09:29 PM
  #20
nyx
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I disagree with quite a lot of this.

I would not want my horse to come into me in the lunging so close that to turn him out I grab his halter. If he comes in that close (without me asking), he has broken the rules. I will stop him when he is absolutely no closer than the longest lenght of my arm. The shear act of disallwoing hinm to come up onto me is a demonstration of your leadership and puts him in a place of "mother may I" if he wishes to approach.


If the horse doesn't know how to lunge with you, I might not go to making him stop every time he gets a bit too fast or actus up. I might give him a few quick jerks on the line to tell him to "knock it off!" but I wont bring him back to a full stop, then start again. NOt every time. To start off, if he gets a bit excited, I am inclined to let him go for a bit. He will soon find how tiring it is, and how hard to maintain his balance on a small circle.
ONce he is better at lunging, then I would agree that each time he starts off too fast, bring him back to a walk and start again.

You see, in your case, your horse keeps stopping and trying to avoid going forward, so for you to stop him will only make this whole process get all chopped up into lots of little starts and stops and then who is really controlling that situation? You need him to move FORWARD above all. If it's a bit too fast at first, that does not really matter, for the time being.

And lastly, I would never have a horse turn cirlces so that his head is comeing around into me. Yes, some people like to move the hind quarters away from them. Cool . But I also see them pull the head around onto themselves and I personally think this is not good.

In any case, you really need a visual example to mimic. Eitehr have some one help you or access some good videos. I like Julie Goodnight, who has some great videos . They are not free, but are not outrageously expensive, either. And she really explains clearly and she is firm but not aggressive.
Its fair enough that you have your own opinions and methods, but mine work and are used by alot of respected horseman in my area. If have trained a few of my horses this way and I end up with a very responsive, submissive and just a great horse all over.

Everyone has their different ways and that has to be respected!

Maybe it was the way I explained wich is hard in hard in writting, but you can't knock a method that works. :)

I don't mean to come off rude, but I get slightly offended and I don't mean to take it the wrong way!
Posted via Mobile Device
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
mussy and I lunging for first time Tayz Horse Videos 13 12-17-2011 11:34 PM
First time lunging Snizard93 Horse Training 12 11-12-2011 05:12 AM
1st time lunging problem emmalish Horse Training 5 04-01-2011 08:37 AM
Extra Time in the Summer... Why Not Make Some Cash? AngelWithoutWings54 Horse Tack and Equipment 4 07-11-2010 03:19 PM
Long rein lunging.... brookelovesparelli Horse Training 5 05-12-2009 05:39 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0