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Lunging Issues

This is a discussion on Lunging Issues within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-19-2012, 06:15 AM
      #11
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by usandpets    
    By trying to get closer to his hip, you are the one getting lunged. He spins not only to avoid lunging but because you are trying to get to his hip.
    Did have a similar thought about that but forgot to elaborate. While I've seen others train horses differently, I tend to take a rather direct approach about pressure/cues & I teach the horse to yield to pressure wherever it's directed. So yes, if I directed pressure(not nec. Physical, can be implied/bodylanguage) at his hip, I would indeed expect him to spin & face me. Pressure at his shoulder/neck/side of head tells him to turn away from me, pressure out behind tells them to go forward, out in front tells them to back.
         
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        06-20-2012, 08:09 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Ok thank you, I will try that.
         
        06-20-2012, 08:55 AM
      #13
    Showing
    I do kind of my own thing. I never get behind the horse because then I'm in a line of fire from their rear end. I never get infront of the horse because then they can go backwards and drag me. I have my hand holding the lungeline in an "open" position (away from my body, think Dracula's cape) . I have my lunge whip in the other hand, pointed just behind their hip, my chest is open and facing the horse's hip). That usually is enough. If the horse begins to back up, I do not let up on the pressure, I follow their motion, not changing anything until they go forward. Then I bring my lunge whip to the "off" position at my side or behind me and allow them to move forward.

    Now if this is a dangerous horse, I do this so I don't get an aggressive response (which has worked for me so far with all of the horses I've handled) and if the horse is a little more introvert and nervous, this method works well in giving them the clear answer (forward removes the pressure of the lunge whip).

    But again, I'm not a trainer. I just do what I feel makes most sense for the horse and myself. I don't want either of us in a dangerous situation.
         
        06-20-2012, 07:57 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    I do kind of my own thing. I never get behind the horse because then I'm in a line of fire from their rear end. I never get infront of the horse because then they can go backwards and drag me.
    Yup, for 'lunging', *I* don't put myself behind or in front of the horse, I *direct pressure* there. But generally, while being aware of safety concerns, I like to get my horses responding to me in whatever way from wherever I stand in relation to their body. Eg. Ask them to back up from standing directly behind them(obviously far enough back not to get walked on!), back up from directly in front of them... & you don't get dragged yourself if you're not hanging off the lead.
         
        06-20-2012, 08:11 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    I like to get my horses responding to me in whatever way from wherever I stand in relation to their body. Eg. Ask them to back up from standing directly behind them(obviously far enough back not to get walked on!), back up from directly in front of them... & you don't get dragged yourself if you're not hanging off the lead.

    Yeah I'm not quite experienced enough to experiment with that yet :P But working on it!!

    ........................Why are there carrots in my message, ROFL
         
        06-20-2012, 08:42 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    

    ........................Why are there carrots in my message, ROFL
    No idea, was about to ask you!
         
        06-20-2012, 08:49 PM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by usandpets    
    I will have to disagree with those that say to make him spin or back up. By making him spin or back up, you have stopped asking for what you want. Essentially releasing the pressure to go forward, which is what you want. That release or change tells the horse that what it did was right, so it will continue to do it again.

    OP, he hasn't forgot how to lunge. He has however, learned how to avoid it, by spinning and backing up. By trying to get closer to his hip, you are the one getting lunged. He spins not only to avoid lunging but because you are trying to get to his hip.

    Let's put a different perspective on this. Instead of "making" him spin or back up, let him. Let him make the choice of going forward. When we put pressure on the horse, the horse will try different things to "get away" from the pressure. When we release the pressure, whatever the horse did last, that is what they learn is what was needed to make the pressure stop.

    When you ask him to lunge, let him spin and back up but keep asking him to lunge. Keep asking until he takes a step forward. That step will actually be him moving his front end away from you by pivoting on his rear end.

    When I lunge a horse, I don't try to get to its rear to make it go forward. I put pressure on its head and neck to move away. That will give you your access to the rear end to move the horse forward. I give a horse a count of three to respond when I ask it to lunge. Then I go directly towards their head. At first I may end up smacking their neck or the side of their jaw before they turn away. The instant they turn away, I quit asking. When they get more consistent about turning away when I first ask, then I start to ask for more forward movement.

    I have had to work with different horses that did the same as your horse. Some were quicker to respond than others but they all figured it out. Just remain calm, be patient and be consistent.
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    So WELL Said! This, this this!
         
        06-20-2012, 08:51 PM
      #18
    Showing
    How long do you normally lunge him for. If more than about 3 circles each way at the trot he's likely sick of doing them.
         
        06-24-2012, 02:13 AM
      #19
    Foal
    My guy has a similar but slightly different problem where he will try and stick to me and invades my space.....facing me. I have found that using the handle of the crop to keep his front end out of my space will get him moving out from me while the flexible end is still able to be in the vicinity of his rear so I can ask him to step out from me and get him going.

    He is a very intelligent and inquisitive horse, very bold and nosy and STUBBORN. I have just started working him after he has been primarily ridden by a very submissive person....we have so much to work on! !~!
         

    Tags
    lunging, training, young horse

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