Lunging in Round Pen
 
 

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Lunging in Round Pen

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  • Horse rears when asked to lunge left
  • Round pen lunge

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    01-21-2012, 03:47 PM
  #1
Foal
Lunging in Round Pen

We purchased a horse for our daughter (her first one) she has ridden several different horses at two different facilities during lessons over the last few years. So she has some experience. Anyway, the horse we purchased she has known since the horse was born and now the horse is going on six years old a Arabian/Morgan mix.

She rode the horse at the facility a few times before we purchased it for her and seemed to have control over the ride. When we set up the round pen and she started to lunge her she did well at first but then began bucking and rearing up on her hind legs. My daughter made it out of the pen safely and we watched as she threw a fit. My daughter tried to control the situation when she first started to misbehave but soon it became dangerous. Thankfully, she or the horse were not hurt and the horse calmed down enough for my daughter and I to return into the round pen and take her back to her pasture.

We later asked the original trainer about this and she stated that the horse did not like being lunged and left it at that. My daughter continues to work with the horse concentrating on ground work and she seems to be doing well. Our current trainer stated that she was with her mother too long and was still acting like a foal. We really need some help! Any input will be appreciated
     
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    01-21-2012, 03:50 PM
  #2
Green Broke
There are a lot of threads in training about best ways to lunge your horse, but rearing is an extremely dangerous habit.

I would honestly advise a trainer, we can't see if its pain, fear or the horse trying to win one over.

If you can video it, that would be great.. apart from that, invest in a trainer to work with the horse and your daughter.
     
    01-21-2012, 03:59 PM
  #3
Foal
I hope Daffy Ducks quote that she is smacking her head about stupid people and dumb situations is not about our situation. We do have a trainer currently and have used her services. My daughter just wants to work with her horse from time to time. I assure you we are very safe with both of them!
     
    01-21-2012, 04:03 PM
  #4
Green Broke
No its not ;D

Its not even about this place, really.. I was at work and frustrated.. but its Duffy with a you.. like Bond with the James haha!

Honestly though, your trainer needs to REALLY help with this, and if your trainer can't find other outside help in addition to get this cracked. A rear in the lunge pen can easily turn in to a lunge under saddle if the horse decides NO. There are many ways and means to do help with this, but its better to nip it in the bud than to allow it to progress to extremes.
     
    01-21-2012, 04:11 PM
  #5
Foal
I think you need to have the trainer out to lunge the horse and see what she thinks is the matter. Really no way to tell over the internet.
     
    01-21-2012, 04:27 PM
  #6
Foal
I just went back and re-read the OP. So the trainer has already observed this behavior and had no suggestions on how to fix it?

I think I'd return the horse. I mean, none of them are perfect but geez, rearing? A kid's first horse? I just don't think that's suitable. Even if the horse never does it under saddle, but only on the lunge (or in the round pen) you still have hooves flying around the vicinity of the kid's head. Nope. I wouldn't want to risk it.

The bucking, no biggie. Lots of them will kick out or buck on the lunge. But I think rearing is a dangerous habit.

A first horse should be a fun confidence builder. Just doesn't sound like this one fits the bill.

ETA: I think maybe next time I'd look at horses a bit older than five. Something in its teens or at least into double digits is generally a safer bet.
     
    01-21-2012, 06:15 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by shellyh82    
We later asked the original trainer about this and she stated that the horse did not like being lunged and left it at that. My daughter continues to work with the horse concentrating on ground work and she seems to be doing well. Our current trainer stated that she was with her mother too long and was still acting like a foal. We really need some help! Any input will be appreciated
This right here is a HUGE red flag to me. This horse has been allowed to get away with alot of stuff, and has been 'excused' of it, and that your trainer DID NOT say anything of it before you took her home is not a positive thing.

A horse that is supposed to be a kids horse, to me, had darn well better have perfect ground manners as well as undersaddle manners. You may be in for a long hard road that may not end well, especially since the horse won the first battle (your daughter leaving the round pen, when she threw her fit). I would be finding a new trainer, first of all, and having him or her coming out and getting the ground work sorted out...from there, you will have to decide whether this is really the best first horse for your daughter.

IMHO anything under 15 is not reliable enough and has not 'been there done that enough' for a child under 10 years old. I've seen way too many kids get hurt by inexperienced green horses to feel any differently. True, there are those exceptions out there, but they are really far and few between when you think about it.
beau159 and DuffyDuck like this.
     
    01-21-2012, 06:36 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
I agree that 6 is still a very young horse , especially for a child. Is it possible you could trade this horse for one with more experience and a less volitile personality?

I would have to see the horse in the round pen and whether or not it was rearing "at" your daughter or just rearing our of exhuberance and resistance to being asked to move. But either way, rearing as a reaction to pressure , as this horse has done, is a very bad habit. You want to know what your horse will do when the poo hits the fan. Of course, we can never be sure, but a horse that rears when a handler pressures him in the round pen may very well choose rearing as it's reaction under other kinds of pressure.

On the other hand, a good trainer may be able to convince the mare that rearing is not acceptable. Unfortunately , such training may or may not be transferable to a child, and probably not.
Wallaby and FirstLightFarm like this.
     
    01-21-2012, 06:50 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
On the other hand, a good trainer may be able to convince the mare that rearing is not acceptable. Unfortunately , such training may or may not be transferable to a child, and probably not.
I agree. It's certainly possible to train a horse not to rear. But that behavior, once established, can sometimes reappear with a different handler or when the horse is faced with a different situation. Not something I'd want to risk with a kid.
     
    01-22-2012, 12:28 AM
  #10
Green Broke
I completely agree with the last few posts.

A younger "hot" horse (6-year-old Arabian cross) is NEVER a good idea for a kid's first horse, whether or not you will be having a trainer continue to work with you.

GREEN + GREEN = BLACK & BLUE

I am also appalled with the reaction of the original trainer. I hope your new one is better than that. That's unacceptable.

What if the horse had reared and flipped over onto your daughter who then had to be admitted to the hospital with internal injuries? It's a possibility. That's why its always smart to buy an older horse that is calm, quiet, and has "been there done that". Is there any way you can return the horse for having this issue that probably wasn't disclosed to you?
     

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