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Major Canter problems (video)

This is a discussion on Major Canter problems (video) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What is "hitchy" in a horse
  • Will trotter horses ever canter

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    04-08-2012, 03:47 PM
  #11
Trained
Sorry, but when it comes to stuff like this-I will call my chiro no matter what the vet says. Sure can't hurt at this point.
Rascaholic likes this.
     
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    04-08-2012, 03:50 PM
  #12
Weanling
Thank you! I think I will have the vet look at it one more time :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beling    
Actually, I was thinking hip or stifle problems. I think he has lovely gaits otherwise, but it seems as if he's uncomfortable.
     
    04-08-2012, 03:52 PM
  #13
Green Broke
My 18 yr old Fox Trotter does the same thing. I don't know if cantering is naturally hard for gaited horses or if it is just that everyone focuses on their intermediate gaits and never really rides the canter. Probably both!

So I feel for ya!

I have been working on not letting my mare go hollow at faster gaits but it's hard because it seems to be her modus operandi. I have had my best luck cantering her up slight inclines because it shifts her weight back to her hindquarters.

Cantering her (which I do just for fun out on the trails) is kind of an interesting experience. She is either pacing, cantering, half of both, or sometimes I will get a lovely canter until I feel this big jarring motion on her back end, which feels like a car shifting into gears very roughly, which I'm sure is her cross cantering like your horse. So long as we don't go down and I get some canter strides that is a successful canter for her, lol!

I know my horse is traveling hollow at faster gaits because pacing is also a sign of hollowness. But holding her together is easier said than done.

At a walk she will actually collect a bit, but the faster we go, the hollower she travels.

Anyway, from what I understand this is a common thing for gaited horses. I don't think it necessarily means he is in pain somewhere. More like he doesn't know how to use his body at speed. Just my 2 cents anyway.
     
    04-08-2012, 03:56 PM
  #14
Trained
Does he do this under saddle also? I guess I missed that if you said. Just a suggestion-if you are going to have the vet look again-why not try another set of eyes? At least another vet if you won't try a chiro.
     
    04-08-2012, 03:58 PM
  #15
Weanling
Talking

Yes, he is a TWH :) Thanks for that info! I think I am going to first work on getting his head low and consisitant in the trot, (he basically has it in the walk) and then work on the canter. When he lowers his head in the trot I feel he is moving better so I think that will apply for the canter.

I will go back to the start and work on those things!

Thanks so much :) Keep bringing ideas everyone!
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
My 18 yr old Fox Trotter does the same thing. I don't know if cantering is naturally hard for gaited horses or if it is just that everyone focuses on their intermediate gaits and never really rides the canter. Probably both!

So I feel for ya!

I have been working on not letting my mare go hollow at faster gaits but it's hard because it seems to be her modus operandi. I have had my best luck cantering her up slight inclines because it shifts her weight back to her hindquarters.

Cantering her (which I do just for fun out on the trails) is kind of an interesting experience. She is either pacing, cantering, half of both, or sometimes I will get a lovely canter until I feel this big jarring motion on her back end, which feels like a car shifting into gears very roughly, which I'm sure is her cross cantering like your horse. So long as we don't go down and I get some canter strides that is a successful canter for her, lol!

I know my horse is traveling hollow at faster gaits because pacing is also a sign of hollowness. But holding her together is easier said than done.

At a walk she will actually collect a bit, but the faster we go, the hollower she travels.

Anyway, from what I understand this is a common thing for gaited horses. I don't think it necessarily means he is in pain somewhere. More like he doesn't know how to use his body at speed. Just my 2 cents anyway.
     
    04-08-2012, 04:03 PM
  #16
Weanling
Red face

Thanks for the info. He has never had an injury, I have looked at the vet records and talked to the previous owners. I think I will have to work on the frame (head) and slowly work that into the canter in time. Patience really is a virtue
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
He may not have back problems. Although he moves much like my Rascal did when I first got him. Pelvic injury was our culprit. He is physically unable to get his legs far enough under him to achieve proper balance and collection. The injury doesn't allow the pelvic tilt and elongation of the spine for a proper frame. He carries his head high because he is struggling for balance. The misfires that I see are like Rascals in a lot of ways.

Rascal couldn't get his back end to keep pace with the front. We still have days where he has this problem at a canter. Even at a walk before we got some of his muscles built up. He had NO muscle and is still under muscled in his topline. He will most likely always be this way.... Time, therapy, chiro, diet, and loads of exercise have helped a LOT. But this will always be an issue for him.


ETA: This was also extremely painful at the canter to start with. He kept, for want of a better term, pulling a groin muscle.
     
    04-08-2012, 04:14 PM
  #17
Weanling
Thanks everyone! Keep the ideas coming :)
     
    04-08-2012, 04:21 PM
  #18
Weanling
Yes, he does. I think I will do that. Thanks!
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Does he do this under saddle also? I guess I missed that if you said. Just a suggestion-if you are going to have the vet look again-why not try another set of eyes? At least another vet if you won't try a chiro.
     
    04-08-2012, 04:37 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
Thanks for the info. He has never had an injury, I have looked at the vet records and talked to the previous owners. I think I will have to work on the frame (head) and slowly work that into the canter in time. Patience really is a virtue
My guy is also a TWH. Honestly I keep looking at the video and I see a horse in pain. He just moves stiff,odd,gimpy,weird. I could be wrong. It's just my opinion.

Seriously though, when I see that type of back end movement I think pain, pain, and more pain. It's the only time I have ever seen that type of hitchy skipping steps and I have seen it more than I like to think about.
     
    04-08-2012, 04:40 PM
  #20
Weanling
He isn't in pain. I have had more than one vet look and other people. I think it is a balance issue and that he needs more back end muscle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
My guy is also a TWH. Honestly I keep looking at the video and I see a horse in pain. He just moves stiff,odd,gimpy,weird. I could be wrong. It's just my opinion.

Seriously though, when I see that type of back end movement I think pain, pain, and more pain. It's the only time I have ever seen that type of hitchy skipping steps and I have seen it more than I like to think about.
     

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canter problems, gallop, horse training

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