Major Canter problems (video) - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Major Canter problems (video)

This is a discussion on Major Canter problems (video) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Video of correct horse cantor
  • Horse crossfires canter

Like Tree24Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-08-2012, 04:47 PM
  #21
Weanling
Overall, what I can take from this threat is that I need to go back to the basics,
Get his head low and consistent and work uphill, in time it will come :)
Thanks everyone!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-08-2012, 04:57 PM
  #22
Trained
Mine is a TWH X-and he used to crossfire on the lunge sometimes. Drove me nuts! Reining training has taken care of that! He uses himself really well now. I will say he still has one lead that he feels "twist". Like he is cross firing, but he is not. He will have the Chiro see him as soon as he gets back in June. But, building and retraining his muscles has helped.
     
    04-08-2012, 04:58 PM
  #23
Weanling
Talking

It drives me nuts too lol :)
I think that is totally true!
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Mine is a TWH X-and he used to crossfire on the lunge sometimes. Drove me nuts! Reining training has taken care of that! He uses himself really well now. I will say he still has one lead that he feels "twist". Like he is cross firing, but he is not. He will have the Chiro see him as soon as he gets back in June. But, building and retraining his muscles has helped.
     
    04-08-2012, 06:49 PM
  #24
Weanling
SO what do you do with those horses?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
My guy is also a TWH. Honestly I keep looking at the video and I see a horse in pain. He just moves stiff,odd,gimpy,weird. I could be wrong. It's just my opinion.

Seriously though, when I see that type of back end movement I think pain, pain, and more pain. It's the only time I have ever seen that type of hitchy skipping steps and I have seen it more than I like to think about.
     
    04-08-2012, 07:14 PM
  #25
Foal
I really appreciated what AnneGage had to say and couldn't agree with her more. I had a tw mare that cross fired when I first got her and getting her to take the correct lead and have self carriage was a challenge. Before this horse even came into my barn I had a dressage trainer lined up to help us achieve suppleness and a comfy canter.
It's common for gaited horses to cross fire. I think it's because they are so open stifled, it makes it harder, so they really DO look gimpy, in pain and generally confused..they just plain old don't know where their feet are <g>.

At 18yrs old, some arthritis could be settling in to the hocks. If your vet says the horse is sound then it's a matter of exactly what AG says. What worked for us was using a longe line and full tack. We ran the line through the d-part of the bit and up over her head to attach to the other side of the bit much like reins would be. For me, I'd never free longe with side reins...too many things to go wrong.
Also, teach your horse long and low...google it and/or have a trainer come out and show you. My horse responded incredibly well with it and we used it as a reward to not only stretch her back muscles, it put her in a happier place and also got her reaching for the bit. We taught her the que when we gently slid the bit or when she really caught on, all I had to do was gently touch my rein and she'd drop her head into a comfy frame and round her back. Tie down and martingales can definitely work, but sometimes can be used as a quick fix or for too long of a training session and cause more damage than good. NOT saying that's what you're doing, it's something I've just seen over and over again.
It took us close to a year of consistant work to have this mare take the correct lead and achieve self balance on the circle with a rider. It was worth every reminder of "ringing the phone" signals down to the bit to ask her to bring her head back down when I watched my trainer ride the circle at a beautiful clean canter without the horse leaning to the outside and she wasn't hauling on the reins to balance her but instead, had both hands on her neck. Not an easy task for a tw and I applaud my trainer for her hard work and dedication..it certainly wasn't because of me, LOL. Best of luck!!
Black Beauty 94 likes this.
     
    04-08-2012, 07:22 PM
  #26
Weanling
Talking

Thanks SO much! I agree with her too :)

They do seem to do it alot, even my friend's 8 year old TWH does it.

The side reins clearly didn't work LOL he still kept his head really high, even being on the tightest ring.

I have a good solid walk with the head, but in the trot and canter he likes to put it up. I wiggle my reins and push him into the bridle and he lowers his head, he just won't keep it down.

I try to do so in the canter but he is all over the place I just try to keep him from doing something not so smart.

So the only thing that worked for you was getting a long low frame? How do you keep it in the canter? My horse just puts his head right up after I release pressure.

Did circles help? What else did you do? How often did you work your horse?

Sorry for all the questions :) Thanks so much!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Horse    
I really appreciated what AnneGage had to say and couldn't agree with her more. I had a tw mare that cross fired when I first got her and getting her to take the correct lead and have self carriage was a challenge. Before this horse even came into my barn I had a dressage trainer lined up to help us achieve suppleness and a comfy canter.
It's common for gaited horses to cross fire. I think it's because they are so open stifled, it makes it harder, so they really DO look gimpy, in pain and generally confused..they just plain old don't know where their feet are <g>.

At 18yrs old, some arthritis could be settling in to the hocks. If your vet says the horse is sound then it's a matter of exactly what AG says. What worked for us was using a longe line and full tack. We ran the line through the d-part of the bit and up over her head to attach to the other side of the bit much like reins would be. For me, I'd never free longe with side reins...too many things to go wrong.
Also, teach your horse long and low...google it and/or have a trainer come out and show you. My horse responded incredibly well with it and we used it as a reward to not only stretch her back muscles, it put her in a happier place and also got her reaching for the bit. We taught her the que when we gently slid the bit or when she really caught on, all I had to do was gently touch my rein and she'd drop her head into a comfy frame and round her back. Tie down and martingales can definitely work, but sometimes can be used as a quick fix or for too long of a training session and cause more damage than good. NOT saying that's what you're doing, it's something I've just seen over and over again.
It took us close to a year of consistant work to have this mare take the correct lead and achieve self balance on the circle with a rider. It was worth every reminder of "ringing the phone" signals down to the bit to ask her to bring her head back down when I watched my trainer ride the circle at a beautiful clean canter without the horse leaning to the outside and she wasn't hauling on the reins to balance her but instead, had both hands on her neck. Not an easy task for a tw and I applaud my trainer for her hard work and dedication..it certainly wasn't because of me, LOL. Best of luck!!
     
    04-08-2012, 07:33 PM
  #27
Trained
Well, mine is NOT GAITED, but, circles are a lot of what reining training is, and it sure has helped him! He is much better balanced, and pushes from behind.
     
    04-08-2012, 07:37 PM
  #28
Super Moderator
The horse looks gaited to me. I think it's not a cantering breed....
     
    04-08-2012, 07:42 PM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
SO what do you do with those horses?
That depends on long term prognosis, general health, and rehab prospects. If they are mine; I have put them down, rehabbed to light riding, pasture puffed, and rehabbed to working riding.
It all depends on the horse and the situation. If the vet says they are going to stay in significant pain, then I'll end their life rather than let them suffer. It all depends on the horse.
I used to help with and rescue a lot of horses. I can't do it anymore. I got sick of being the one to pull the trigger on someone else's mistakes/accidents/neglect.
I take care of my boy (pasture puff forever?) and am happy. I donate money to help others rescue, rehab, and care for those types now. I still volunteer with a friend when I can. I am also always there for the phone call asking for help.
     
    04-08-2012, 07:47 PM
  #30
Weanling
But when you went back on the rail wouldn't he just go back to cross firing?
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Well, mine is NOT GAITED, but, circles are a lot of what reining training is, and it sure has helped him! He is much better balanced, and pushes from behind.
     

Tags
canter problems, gallop, horse training

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
major riding problems :/ brighteyes08 Horse Training 8 12-07-2011 12:44 PM
How to gain a horses trust with a few major problems? megansthehorse Horse Training 6 05-03-2011 10:00 AM
Major Balance Problems Miss Dakota Horse Health 18 07-27-2010 11:38 PM
Some major problems bridling young horse? (Please help??) emilieg Horse Training 27 05-06-2010 05:03 PM
Major farrier problems- can't keep his balance!!! thunderboomer Horse Health 6 11-11-2008 01:47 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0