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Major Canter problems (video)

This is a discussion on Major Canter problems (video) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse using his back
  • Professional lunging a horse

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    04-08-2012, 09:23 PM
  #41
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
I adjusted him from the loosest to the tightest, and either way he still kept his head up. I do know how to use the side reins. Thanks for the advice though! :)
Oh I didn't mean misused by you, I think your horse just doesn't understand them. Hasn't figured them out which is probably why he's resisting them. Which is why I said I would take them off :)

My horse took to them rather well, others don't understand what they're supposed to do with them. Different strokes for different folks.

And I hope I didn't sound rude, I wrote that all in good spirits =)
     
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    04-08-2012, 09:29 PM
  #42
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
Thank you! I think I will try it :) How often do you have to have the chiro. Come out?
For my mare, I've only had the one adjustment. And I saw immediate improvement. I'm taking her back sometime in May to have another one before she starts racing this year. (We do speed events)

Your chiropractor will be able to tell you if you'll need more adjustments and how far apart they should be. My trainer's barn only has a chiropractor out twice a year.

Like I said in the previous post too, you'll get exercises that should be done daily/multiple times a day in order to help your horse. I did mine twice a day, at morning and nighttime feedings for 3 weeks, and then backed down to once a day. Usually before my mare is ridden to help loosen her up and stretch her muscles.

I'm very pleased. :-D
Black Beauty 94 likes this.
     
    04-08-2012, 09:29 PM
  #43
Yearling
I was riding a TWH yesterday that does the same thing. I cantered her but other than cantering in the field, she isn't ever cantered under saddle. She hasn't got the proper muscling for it, and that made her unbalanced. Most avid walking-horse fanatics don't want their horse's precious gait to be 'tarnished' by the horse breaking into a canter, which is why a lot of folks will say things like TWHs aren't a cantering breed. It's because really, they're not. BUT, that doesn't mean they CAN'T. There's nothing wrong with cantering your gaited horse, if that's whatcha wanna do! Lol. Just don't expect a canter similar to a quarter horse or thoroughbred, because TWHs are built so much differently, and it takes a lot more work to build up the proper muscling in their back and hind end for them to canter balanced - especially with a rider! :)

Honestly, the people who are telling you the horse is in pain aren't saying "OI! He's going to throw a hip out if you keep that up!" I think what they're saying is comparable to someone who is a professional runner going out and lifting weights for a few hours. Not built for it, not accustomed to it, and not properly conditioned for it. OUCH!

Once the horse is balanced, which requires work through the hips, back, and neck (topline), you will see improvement.
     
    04-08-2012, 09:29 PM
  #44
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
No, its ok :) what did you do to those horses to help them canter correctly?
Rehabbing started on the flat. Then we went to hills at a walk. Walking uphill is harder than running up it and it lessened the risk of straining something again. Then came the round pen for simple conditioning if they couldn't be ridden. Walks walks and more walks on the trails to keep their minds occupied if they couldn't be ridden.

I think I still have a couple of the rehab plans. If I can find them I'll scan them and post them.

ETA:
It was all about building muscle and teaching them to use it correctly.
     
    04-08-2012, 09:32 PM
  #45
Weanling
Oh haha, I thought that is what you meant.
I think your right, he doesn't know what they are for. Hahah :)
How do I know if he is using his back?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Oh I didn't mean misused by you, I think your horse just doesn't understand them. Hasn't figured them out which is probably why he's resisting them. Which is why I said I would take them off :)

My horse took to them rather well, others don't understand what they're supposed to do with them. Different strokes for different folks.

And I hope I didn't sound rude, I wrote that all in good spirits =)
     
    04-08-2012, 09:33 PM
  #46
Weanling
Oh ok! I do not get to the barn everyday, I board him :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
For my mare, I've only had the one adjustment. And I saw immediate improvement. I'm taking her back sometime in May to have another one before she starts racing this year. (We do speed events)

Your chiropractor will be able to tell you if you'll need more adjustments and how far apart they should be. My trainer's barn only has a chiropractor out twice a year.

Like I said in the previous post too, you'll get exercises that should be done daily/multiple times a day in order to help your horse. I did mine twice a day, at morning and nighttime feedings for 3 weeks, and then backed down to once a day. Usually before my mare is ridden to help loosen her up and stretch her muscles.

I'm very pleased. :-D
     
    04-08-2012, 09:35 PM
  #47
Weanling
Thanks! Yes, I totally agree.

I just have to get his muscle up I believe :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
I was riding a TWH yesterday that does the same thing. I cantered her but other than cantering in the field, she isn't ever cantered under saddle. She hasn't got the proper muscling for it, and that made her unbalanced. Most avid walking-horse fanatics don't want their horse's precious gait to be 'tarnished' by the horse breaking into a canter, which is why a lot of folks will say things like TWHs aren't a cantering breed. It's because really, they're not. BUT, that doesn't mean they CAN'T. There's nothing wrong with cantering your gaited horse, if that's whatcha wanna do! Lol. Just don't expect a canter similar to a quarter horse or thoroughbred, because TWHs are built so much differently, and it takes a lot more work to build up the proper muscling in their back and hind end for them to canter balanced - especially with a rider! :)

Honestly, the people who are telling you the horse is in pain aren't saying "OI! He's going to throw a hip out if you keep that up!" I think what they're saying is comparable to someone who is a professional runner going out and lifting weights for a few hours. Not built for it, not accustomed to it, and not properly conditioned for it. OUCH!

Once the horse is balanced, which requires work through the hips, back, and neck (topline), you will see improvement.
     
    04-08-2012, 09:36 PM
  #48
Weanling
Thanks! Yes, I agree!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
Rehabbing started on the flat. Then we went to hills at a walk. Walking uphill is harder than running up it and it lessened the risk of straining something again. Then came the round pen for simple conditioning if they couldn't be ridden. Walks walks and more walks on the trails to keep their minds occupied if they couldn't be ridden.

I think I still have a couple of the rehab plans. If I can find them I'll scan them and post them.

ETA:
It was all about building muscle and teaching them to use it correctly.
     
    04-08-2012, 10:10 PM
  #49
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Beauty 94    
Oh haha, I thought that is what you meant.
I think your right, he doesn't know what they are for. Hahah :)
How do I know if he is using his back?
You know how a horse has those muscles along his spine that we call the topline? Well when a horse uses their back, you'll feel the spine lift up underneath you.. they become rounder. Visually too.

Let me try to get some pics of me lunging my horse..

That would be using his back. See how his spine (before his hip) is rounded up:
http://www.horseforum.com/attachment...s-p1360733.jpg

This is not using his back.. it's dipping down like a banana like you can see here:

http://www.horseforum.com/attachment...t-img_0195.jpg

He is hollow, meaning his back isn't relaxed, being on the wrong lead, not balanced so he's using the side reins to lean on, he's rigid and bracing all over.. and you can see from his high head set that he was not really in the zone. It happens. We were working on the canter and that gait held some bad memories for him.

But I took away his crutch (the lungeline, he'd lean on it) and he began to lean on his side reins for balance. Now he's fine.

But that's the different between using their back and not. Avoid the banana shape :P

You can't force it.. it's something the horse has to do on their own. But you can encourage them by sending their energy forward and keeping quiet on their back, letting them balance and relax.

Here's a good thread I made that will help your horse relax:

Stretches (and muscle building) for your horse

It has a reference to another thread (my favourite one) that talks about building topline (those muscles on their side of the spine.)

Hope that helps :)
     
    04-08-2012, 10:20 PM
  #50
Weanling
Talking

Yep, I do. :) He looks real nice in that one picture!

In the other one, doesn't he have the wrong head in the back? :)

He is a nice mover! I will avoid the banana shape haha

That does thank you!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
You know how a horse has those muscles along his spine that we call the topline? Well when a horse uses their back, you'll feel the spine lift up underneath you.. they become rounder. Visually too.

Let me try to get some pics of me lunging my horse..

That would be using his back. See how his spine (before his hip) is rounded up:
http://www.horseforum.com/attachment...s-p1360733.jpg

This is not using his back.. it's dipping down like a banana like you can see here:

http://www.horseforum.com/attachment...t-img_0195.jpg

He is hollow, meaning his back isn't relaxed, being on the wrong lead, not balanced so he's using the side reins to lean on, he's rigid and bracing all over.. and you can see from his high head set that he was not really in the zone. It happens. We were working on the canter and that gait held some bad memories for him.

But I took away his crutch (the lungeline, he'd lean on it) and he began to lean on his side reins for balance. Now he's fine.

But that's the different between using their back and not. Avoid the banana shape :P

You can't force it.. it's something the horse has to do on their own. But you can encourage them by sending their energy forward and keeping quiet on their back, letting them balance and relax.

Here's a good thread I made that will help your horse relax:

Stretches (and muscle building) for your horse

It has a reference to another thread (my favourite one) that talks about building topline (those muscles on their side of the spine.)

Hope that helps :)
     

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canter problems, gallop, horse training

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