Making Training Fun - The Horse Forum
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By HippoLogic
  • 1 Post By Foxhunter
  • 1 Post By boots
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 Old 08-08-2012, 04:33 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 84
• Horses: 0
Making Training Fun

So, a lot of you know that I have two foals: four and five months old soon. Anyway, I do most of their handling on my own and I was just wondering if you guys/gals have any ideas/tips for doing fun solo things with my boys? Things I can do at home with stuff I have around my place. I am working on desentizing them to different things, leading them through an obstacle course: over boards, boards raised off the ground, walking on/over garbage bags (that is all I really have around my place.),I lead them around the yard. I try to mix it up, but they don't seem like them are overly interested: ie: plodding along, ears back. I also try to keep their lessons short. Ideas?
Horsegal16 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 08-09-2012, 02:15 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 12,667
• Horses: 0
Remember to be consistent & put 'manners' & safety at the top of your list, then go look into clicker training & ImagineAHorse for some techniques & tricks that are fun for you AND your horses!
loosie is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 08-25-2012, 10:57 AM
Foal
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 104
• Horses: 1
Foals from 4 and 5 month old are really still baby's. In the wild they would still drink milk.

Desensitizing can be good, but if you overdo it you get dull horses. So what is really important is that you have to REWARD to foals for what they are doing. In that way you keep them interested in you and your training.

When training animals (or humans ), you have to remember that the RECEIVER determent what is considered a "reward". Since these animals are so young they are probably more interested in getting groomed (a nice scratch under their neck or whithers) than in food.

Besides desensitizing you can learn them to be haltered (learn them to put their head into the halter), pick up their feet and learn them to walk along. That is more that enough for such baby's.

But you want to spent a lot of time of course. Well just BE there. Sit in the pasture (of stall) and just learn to know them by observing them. What do they do? How do they react to other horses, sounds, movement, etc. Learn if they are bold or shy. What do they like? Running? Eating? Lying in the sun etc.
loosie likes this.
HippoLogic is offline  
post #4 of 8 Old 08-25-2012, 11:27 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 9,901
• Horses: 0
From experience I know that you can do to much with foals.
Personally I do not bother them much. They soon learn to be haltered and pick their feet up and lead, that is all I do with them.

As for desensitising I do not bother. Never found any need to teach them to walk over tarps or polythene sheets when they are being ridden they just accept that if I ask them to do it then it is safe and they will.

The only time I ever 'play' with them is if they have to be confined for some reason. Then I will mess around with them more to alleviate any boredom.
Palomine likes this.
Foxhunter is online now  
post #5 of 8 Old 08-25-2012, 11:51 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 5,682
• Horses: 0
I knew of some former Pony Clubbers, now moms, who had a little program going for foals at a TB farm in Kentucky. Those ladies were awesome.

They took the foals on walks, braided what they could on manes and tails, groomed endlessly, basically played with them, around cones, over bridges, through mazes. They always had snacks and music in the barn.

Those foals had the best manners and were lively and engaged, and the moms got horse time while family duties kept them from being horse owners.

But, me? I'm more like Foxhunter. Once halter broke and able to be handled, I leave them be. And mine are well mannered, too.
Palomine likes this.
boots is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 08-25-2012, 03:11 PM
Started
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,249
• Horses: 0
I go the opposite way as the previous two posters. I have halter broke yearlings and weanlings for the harness track. They would go to the sale or training at a yearling to race as a two year old. If they don't have manners they don't sell well and if they don't have manners training at the track is that much harder. So, I worked on basic skills, loading in a trailer, standing for a bath/washing. Rubbing them with blankets and touching them everywhere. Try desensitizing them to clippers or motors of all sorts. I tried to think of skills the horse was going to need in its future career.
rookie is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 08-25-2012, 06:04 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 182
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsegal16 View Post
So, a lot of you know that I have two foals: four and five months old soon. Anyway, I do most of their handling on my own and I was just wondering if you guys/gals have any ideas/tips for doing fun solo things with my boys? Things I can do at home with stuff I have around my place. I am working on desentizing them to different things, leading them through an obstacle course: over boards, boards raised off the ground, walking on/over garbage bags (that is all I really have around my place.),I lead them around the yard. I try to mix it up, but they don't seem like them are overly interested: ie: plodding along, ears back. I also try to keep their lessons short. Ideas?
Smilies.. reading this you are already ahead of the game so to speak with your handling...

Already you are noticing that your youngesters are becoming used to all sorts that would probably scare other adult horses..

There is a balance between doing as you say a little ground work at a time and also letting them be, to get on being a horse ...Well done..!
canterburyhorsetrailrider is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 08-26-2012, 01:11 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SW UK
Posts: 9,901
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie View Post
I go the opposite way as the previous two posters. I have halter broke yearlings and weanlings for the harness track. They would go to the sale or training at a yearling to race as a two year old. If they don't have manners they don't sell well and if they don't have manners training at the track is that much harder. So, I worked on basic skills, loading in a trailer, standing for a bath/washing. Rubbing them with blankets and touching them everywhere. Try desensitizing them to clippers or motors of all sorts. I tried to think of skills the horse was going to need in its future career.
I agree with you over this but, if the basics, like picking up feet, leading and having a halter on are done and established the rest follows without any problems.

A yearling I have, who has had little actual handling for the last six months, damaged himself very badly. He is on box rest - he had never been in a stable in his life as all mares, foals and youngsters, are in loose pens - he has accepted it all without bothering much. He ties up, allows me to do the cleaning of his wound, scrub his belly where the crud runs onto it, then dress the area. He has taken a lightweight shoot on to stop the flies getting to the area, allowed me to pull his mind whilst he was loose in the stable.

It all depends on what type of handling they get from the outset.
Foxhunter is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making a Vet Kit Skippy! Horse Health 271 06-04-2016 09:46 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome