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Mare suddenly won't come out of stall

This is a discussion on Mare suddenly won't come out of stall within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • My horse won;t come out stall
  • Horse wont leave stall

 
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    11-17-2009, 06:38 PM
  #11
Yearling
I agree with Kevin, food should always be like a reward. That last thing I do to my horse is feed him. I feed him when the days work is done, it is his reward. Just feed her after you are done with everything, then she won't be taken away from her food and you won't have to worry about it.
     
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    11-17-2009, 07:03 PM
  #12
Banned
Well IMO, since I don't have a concrete schedule, I would much rather have a horse who can come out of his stall and work at any time, whether it be in the middle of the day or smack dab in the middle of feeding time. But I also don't keep him on my own property, so I don't have very much control over when he's fed.
     
    11-17-2009, 09:33 PM
  #13
Trained
You should be able to catch your horse at any time but don't expect him to be happy about it. In the OP she said that she fed the horse then put him in his stall to eat for ten minutes.
     
    11-17-2009, 10:50 PM
  #14
Green Broke
I agree with kevinshorses. Yes, all horses should leave food and aggression shouldn't be an issue, but she's learning to associate you and work with being taken away from her food. I'm assuming she's not freefed since she's coming into her stall to eat hay, so you really have to look into equine dynamics. They weren't meant to eat in this fashion to begin with, much less be annoyed by humans forcing them away from their dinner.

Ours are free fed, so it's never an issue. They're more then happy to come see who might have a cookie and never annoyed at leaving their hay. They know it'll be there when it gets back. It's equine nature to protect food, especially when they know it only comes at particular times - she's protecting her food from you, an intruder.

If for whatever reason I was in a situation where my horse was on a set feed schedule (god forbid), I'd definitely choose my work times around the feed times. If she's only getting 10 minutes worth of hay, it doesn't even have much of a point. Just let her eat when she's done and let her associate work with a good thing.
     
    11-17-2009, 11:18 PM
  #15
Started
I just picked up on something kevinhorses said....don't expect your horse to be happy about you catching him.....your horse SHOULD want to interract with you, he SHOULD want to spend time with you. If he doesn't want to, then there is a hole in the relationship.
     
    11-18-2009, 08:35 AM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
I just picked up on something kevinhorses said....don't expect your horse to be happy about you catching him.....your horse SHOULD want to interract with you, he SHOULD want to spend time with you. If he doesn't want to, then there is a hole in the relationship.
I believe he meant in a situation like this one, not in general. You can't mess with the biological natural function of horses and expect them to be "happy". Willing maybe, but I think it's a little extreme to expect a horse to actually prefer hanging out with you instead of eating in a situation where the feeding isn't natural to their function.
     
    11-18-2009, 03:23 PM
  #17
Weanling
I understand what you are saying about the feeding before work, however, that is another thing she is so used to, coming in after turnout and eating. So it is difficult to stop before her stall and crosstie her/tack her up, because she is focused on getting to her stall and expecting dinner. I don't grain before we work, I just let her eat some hay. I will try some of your suggestions. You are right in that she may not be comfortable with the work we are doing, because I just took her out of the round pen to lunge on the flat and she doesn't know how to circle! The time change has totally messed up my normal routine!
     
    11-19-2009, 12:38 AM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
This is a dominance issue. She's basically saying, it sounds like, "No, I don't wanna!" Even though this is a dominance issue, the worst thing you could do is go in, guns blazing, and smack her just for the sake of "showing her who is boss." She won't respond to that.

So, what you really need to do is make her more curious about you. Open her stall door (have a lead rope with you) and stand just outside the door. If she ignores you, crouch down and very.....very.....very....slowly, inch toward her hind end (but stay out of the kick zone!) and when you can, take the lead rope and flick her on the gaskin, under the flank, under the belly, etc....you don't want to hurt her or cause pain, but you do want to irritate her....enough that she looks at you like "WHAT do you want??" You'll have to use enough umph to cause an effect. When she looks at you, stand up, turn away and walk to the door. As soon as she looks away, crouch down again and repeat the process. The reason you go slow is because you want everything about you to be intense.....if someone approaches you quickly, it's kind of predictable, but if someone is slow and seemingly sneeky, you don't know what's coming and you want to keep your eye on them...same with a horse (a confident, dominant one). You want to get her curious about you so that she will offer to come over to you...then you can put the halter on. And make sure when you lunge her that you make things fun and interesting, not just boring circles.

Oh good lord…if I acted like this my horse would wonder what the heck happened to ME! You promote that "Predator/Prey" stuff and what do you think you are acting like here crouching down and inching towards her hind end? Crap like this can get your face kicked in no matter how careful you think you are. I don't act any different around a horse than I always do. When I enter a stall, I enter a stall. If I approach a horse with a halter, that's what I'm going to do, halter the horse. No guesswork involved. The horse KNOWS what to expect and what I want.

Seahorseys - How IMPORTANT is it to you to lunge her when you do instead allowing her to eat in peace before you lunge her. If your answer is VERY IMPORTANT, then you will have to treat it as such. If your answer is, NOT very important, then let her eat. Being a good leader has as much to do with considering your horse and what is best for it as it does insisting that it does what you want when you want.
     
    11-19-2009, 01:34 AM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse    
This is a dominance issue. She's basically saying, it sounds like, "No, I don't wanna!" Even though this is a dominance issue, the worst thing you could do is go in, guns blazing, and smack her just for the sake of "showing her who is boss." She won't respond to that.

So, what you really need to do is make her more curious about you. Open her stall door (have a lead rope with you) and stand just outside the door. If she ignores you, crouch down and very.....very.....very....slowly, inch toward her hind end (but stay out of the kick zone!) and when you can, take the lead rope and flick her on the gaskin, under the flank, under the belly, etc....you don't want to hurt her or cause pain, but you do want to irritate her....enough that she looks at you like "WHAT do you want??" You'll have to use enough umph to cause an effect. When she looks at you, stand up, turn away and walk to the door. As soon as she looks away, crouch down again and repeat the process. The reason you go slow is because you want everything about you to be intense.....if someone approaches you quickly, it's kind of predictable, but if someone is slow and seemingly sneeky, you don't know what's coming and you want to keep your eye on them...same with a horse (a confident, dominant one). You want to get her curious about you so that she will offer to come over to you...then you can put the halter on. And make sure when you lunge her that you make things fun and interesting, not just boring circles.
I didn't read this whole post before but once I did I laughed out loud. I have perfectly gentle horses that would not be too unhappy with being taken away from thier hay but they would probably kick your face off just for general priciples. I don't know that I have ever heard such poor advice seriously given. That would be the perfect technique if you wanted a face that looked like the lady that had her face ripped off by a chimp.
     
    11-19-2009, 01:07 PM
  #20
Yearling
I have never heard of anyone solving a dominance issue that way.... And I definitely wouldn't do it. It's not a dominance issue as it is a food issue. Yes I am a horse lover, and horses do learn to like people BUT, their needs must be met first. Horses spend most of their time eating anyway, in the wild especially. A horse will listen to you, and be more willing to do what is asked, as long as their needs are met. Right now, you are interrupting your mare's needs. So in her mind, you are not providing for her. You can't expect her to behave or listen or respect you if you haven't respected her and provided for her like a leader.

Maybe you should get a different feeding schedule, it will take time to get used to for her, but, I think it would be better in the long run...
     

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