Minor horse riding emergency... Need help. Don't know what to do. - Page 2
 
 

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Minor horse riding emergency... Need help. Don't know what to do.

This is a discussion on Minor horse riding emergency... Need help. Don't know what to do. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • what to do when there is an emergency out in the field and you work with horses
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    10-22-2012, 11:25 PM
  #11
BB2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumRunner    
Agree with macpack in her last post..Maybe he doesn't want to hear it from you but will listen to others? It's like teenagers (or most men) you're always wrong then someone says the exact same thing to them and it's great advice.
Haha sorry! Though he was talking about Me. Ignore my last reply.

He will do whatever I say to do with the horse. That isn't a problem. He just isn't making a big deal out of it at all. But, he knows that I know more about horses so he listens to me.

But it's more of a "wow I didn't know that...oh well" Sort of thing

I told him I wanted to sell the horse and he said no initially but agreed that she has changed the dynamic at the barn. I don't want to do that but if worse comes to worse....
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    10-22-2012, 11:25 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by BB2    
I have a trainer that lives next door and my parents as well as friends are horse people and it all sort of baffles them because this new horse has so much hold on my horse.

I have no idea what you are talking about "coming from me"

I'm doing nothing different. The only change is this new horse and then my horse and entire herd completely shifted.

I can't make the paint horse cut my horses off when they are coming up to me.
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By "coming from you" I am simply referring to the statement you made about how you have told him about the issues but he doesn't get it -- often times this has more to do with the source than the information. For example, parents are often the worst people in the world to attempt to teach their child something (say riding) because the parent/child dynamic keeps the information from flowing from one to the other. Often a parent will take this same child to a lesson, the instructor will tell the child something the parent has been saying for months and the child will openly accept and act on this "new wisdom" - because it is coming from a third party, not their parent. I am NOT comparing your relationship to a parent/child relationship or saying you are being his mother - I am offering an example of how the source can often be the problem, not the information.
     
    10-22-2012, 11:27 PM
  #13
BB2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
By "coming from you" I am simply referring to the statement you made about how you have told him about the issues but he doesn't get it -- often times this has more to do with the source than the information. For example, parents are often the worst people in the world to attempt to teach their child something (say riding) because the parent/child dynamic keeps the information from flowing from one to the other. Often a parent will take this same child to a lesson, the instructor will tell the child something the parent has been saying for months and the child will openly accept and act on this "new wisdom" - because it is coming from a third party, not their parent. I am NOT comparing your relationship to a parent/child relationship or saying you are being his mother - I am offering an example of how the source can often be the problem, not the information.
I know, I totally misread your comment. Sorry about that.

He isn't against reprimanding her and he will do whatever I think should be done but he just doesn't get it or see it. That isn't important to me though really.

I just want to be able to ride at home again without life threatening emergencies!
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    10-22-2012, 11:35 PM
  #14
Green Broke
I don't blame you... If push comes to shove I'd discuss selling the paint, boyfriend obviously doesn't know what he's doingand it takes time to teach a newby how to handle those things.. Even with a trainer, things can get worse for your horses and yourself before they get better and for those things to continue until then, they will only get worse..
     
    10-22-2012, 11:42 PM
  #15
BB2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumRunner    
I don't blame you... If push comes to shove I'd discuss selling the paint, boyfriend obviously doesn't know what he's doingand it takes time to teach a newby how to handle those things.. Even with a trainer, things can get worse for your horses and yourself before they get better and for those things to continue until then, they will only get worse..
I agree. She's a nice horse to ride and great for a beginner... But I never expected such a change in our horses from a tiny little pony.

Honestly, he needs a bigger horse anyway.

But then... We've only had her 2 months and she is great in every other aspect. Not spooky. Responsive. Reliable. I'd hate to just give up on her.

It's a difficult situation, but as of now I am afraid to ride because I am afraid that my horse will pull a stunt like she did last week and get herself or someone else killed. I don't want it to be that way and I DON'T want to pony this paint horse every time I ride.
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    10-22-2012, 11:50 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
Honestly - it seems you are projecting a lot onto the paint horse that might better be placed on you and your horse(s). YOUR horse has become buddy sour/herd bound, and you are blaming the other horse for that? Have you considered that your own feelings towards the paint are being read by your horse(s) and that is why their attitude towards you has shifted?
Actually, it's not ridiculous to believe the dynamic changed when the paint was introduced. The hierarchy in the herd can, and does, affect how the horse responds to humans when we're working with them.

Horses naturally seek leadership. When a horse (or human) presents themselves as a strong leader, the horse will naturally follow. So when this little paint stepped in and started portraying strong leadership in the herd dynamics, the horses just followed their instincts and felt comfortable with this pony telling them what to do and where to go. It's like a safety blanket for them. When you take them away from that dominant figure, you take away their safety (in their eyes) so they get anxious, panicky, and seek leadership. That's when it's your place to step in and reestablish yourself as leader.

There's a reason that most horses who are kept stalled and (mostly) secluded from other horses act differently than horses who are kept in a pasture with several other horses. When a horse is kept stalled, it depends on its human for leadership, socialization, feeding, exercise... When they're kept at pasture with a herd, they have a whole separate totem pole to explore, if that makes sense. They're taking care of themselves, for the most part, and they will gravitate toward whomever steps in as leader within their herd. You have to work a bit harder to establish yourself as the leader.

Try not to get frustrated with the horses - they are just being horses. Sometimes they make us work hard. You can probably learn a lot from this mare if you look at it from the right angle.
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    10-22-2012, 11:53 PM
  #17
Started
Any way to modify two of the stalls to make a larger one? That way she can be more comfortably stalled for a short time while you reconnect with your herd. Or possibly catch the paint, put her in a stall to feed her, and use that time to work with your horses. If you catch her to bring her in to feed her, she shouldn't resent being caught.

Does she show affection to your boyfriend to the point where she would go to him out in the field while you get your horses messed with?
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    10-22-2012, 11:53 PM
  #18
Green Broke
The paint is just being a horse, and has proved to be the boss horse.
When she comes up and turns her butt to you, whack that butt. She goes to chase a horse away from you, you cahse her off ! You be the boss. This is basically the same theing Dream catcher has said. To sell the horse is just because You don't like it. Your horse hs become barn buddy sour, which you will need to correct. Since you cannot seperate them, take your horse out, alone. Go x amount feet , walk back, go out so many more feet, turn and go back, even if you just start a few feet at a time. Start in a safe zone , before she throws a fit,
And work to longer and further distances.
     
    10-22-2012, 11:55 PM
  #19
Started
Also, good post Equilove! I can't like posts in the mobile version.
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    10-23-2012, 12:00 AM
  #20
BB2
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
Actually, it's not ridiculous to believe the dynamic changed when the paint was introduced. The hierarchy in the herd can, and does, affect how the horse responds to humans when we're working with them.

Horses naturally seek leadership. When a horse (or human) presents themselves as a strong leader, the horse will naturally follow. So when this little paint stepped in and started portraying strong leadership in the herd dynamics, the horses just followed their instincts and felt comfortable with this pony telling them what to do and where to go. It's like a safety blanket for them. When you take them away from that dominant figure, you take away their safety (in their eyes) so they get anxious, panicky, and seek leadership. That's when it's your place to step in and reestablish yourself as leader.

There's a reason that most horses who are kept stalled and (mostly) secluded from other horses act differently than horses who are kept in a pasture with several other horses. When a horse is kept stalled, it depends on its human for leadership, socialization, feeding, exercise... When they're kept at pasture with a herd, they have a whole separate totem pole to explore, if that makes sense. They're taking care of themselves, for the most part, and they will gravitate toward whomever steps in as leader within their herd. You have to work a bit harder to establish yourself as the leader.

Try not to get frustrated with the horses - they are just being horses. Sometimes they make us work hard. You can probably learn a lot from this mare if you look at it from the right angle.
The stalls have double walls in between, so it can't be modified.

She doesn't show affection to anyone, even my boyfriend, until she is haltered. When the halter goes on, a different horse emerges almost.

When I catch her to feed, I still work with my horses but its only about an hour each day. They are normal when she is put up. But as soon as she gets out she takes off and they follow. My bay horse isn't as bad as my grey horse. My grey horse NEEDS the paint to be near her all the time.

How can I establish myself as a leader? Besides spanking the paints butt whenever she tests me?
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