My 4 yr old is kicking at me and other horses, help! - Page 2
   

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My 4 yr old is kicking at me and other horses, help!

This is a discussion on My 4 yr old is kicking at me and other horses, help! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • My mares are kicking each other
  • Malehorsespenis

 
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    12-10-2008, 03:19 PM
  #11
Foal
The only time a male horse is usually in danger of being kicked in the belly is when he mounts a mare and if that happens he may suffer an internal or external injury. A male horses penis and testicles are both in that area and horses have had their breeding careers and sometimes their lives ended by a kick. Kicking a horse in the belly is depending on the area the same as gut punching a person or kicking them in their groin. When a jockey kicked a horse in the belly on TV a lot of people complained about it and he was suspended. A mare's udder could be injured by a kick also. If you kick a horse you teach him that kicking is acceptable behavior. I have taught mine that kicking is not allowed.
     
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    12-10-2008, 03:23 PM
  #12
Foal
Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm going to try swapping out the feeding areas and see what that gives me.
They are both being fed at the same time, it is just that the yearling is alittle slower eating.
Blue will even stalk around the pen trying to get to the others food, and believe they are getting enough to eat. I just have to find that point were Blue knows that bad behavor is not exceptable. As for kicking him in the belly, no I don't kick hard enough to cause damage. And I have tried the waving my hands and screaming. But sense a horse is a prey animal I was afraid that it might cause him to become nervous of me and increase the dendency to kick and run.
     
    12-10-2008, 03:58 PM
  #13
Foal
Okay, lets be realistic here. Kicking a horse in the gut does not do as much damage as you appear to think. I will openly admit that I have kicked my horse in the gut when she has kicked out and she has not done it since. It is a behavioral issue that was taken care of. I would rather give her a firm message and stop the problem then have her kick out and hit a person. Honestly, I would like avoid a potential law suit, or being injured myself. Furthermore, I am pretty confidant that male horses will get kicked regardless of them mounting a mare. Lets all keep in mind that these are horses we talking about, they do tend to kick one another from time to time regardless of gender. Its true freak accidents do happen, but the chances of your horse getting a kick in the gut (whether it be from a horse or person) and suffering from an "internal injury" are small. Much smaller than the chance of the horse will be just fine. If anything, they will learn their place, how do you think pecking orders are established?
     
    12-10-2008, 03:59 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kincsem    
The only time a male horse is usually in danger of being kicked in the belly is when he mounts a mare and if that happens he may suffer an internal or external injury. A male horses penis and testicles are both in that area and horses have had their breeding careers and sometimes their lives ended by a kick. Kicking a horse in the belly is depending on the area the same as gut punching a person or kicking them in their groin. When a jockey kicked a horse in the belly on TV a lot of people complained about it and he was suspended. A mare's udder could be injured by a kick also. If you kick a horse you teach him that kicking is acceptable behavior. I have taught mine that kicking is not allowed.
We are not talking about the gential areas. A good swift kick to the belly is a very different from injuring a genital area. Also, I love my horses but when it comes to them acting dangerous, I'm going to put my sercurity first not my horse's. I'd rather injure my horse and stop a nasty, dangerous behavior than have that behavior escalate and have it end up harming myself or someone else. People come first. Not to mention horses double barrel each other quite often and often times those kicks land on the barrel area. Horses bodies are designed to take quite a bit of damage. Kicking is a dangerous, dangerous behavior that should be swiftly reprimanded by whatever means. The biggest rule for any of my horses is that they not hurt me and if they do hurt me, I'm going to do my darndest to hurt them back. If a horse kicks at me and I'm in a position to do it, I'm going to give them a good swift kick in the belly and make sure they know that is not okay.

Secondly, of course some dummy raised a fuss over a jockey kicking a horse in the gut most people see horses as sentimental beings that wouldn't hurt a fly. This is not so, if you're in a public place and smack your horse someone who doesn't know anything about horses will probably make a fuss about it. There's always someone out there who is going to disagree.

Thirdly, horses do not learn to kick because you kick. If you pick your horses nose does he then try to pick it? No he does not. When you brush your horse does he then start trying to brush himself? Nope, didn't think so. Horses immitate the behaviors of other HORSES. Not people.

I apologize for the off topic but seriously. Now concerning ICEMAN who just wants some advice. I think that as you have the facilites to do so, seperating them is the safest choice. I would however recommend being very firm with this gelding at all times, do not feed him first and do not feed him more. If possible I would make it so the two could still see each other and make a point of feeding the yearling first, wait for you gelding to calm down and then feed him. Also, feeding him more will only make him more antsy, which from your last post sounds like you most certainly realize. I think you should just set up very strict boundaries for this horse. Blue acting naughty= Blue not getting fed, obviously I'm not saying starve him but he should act calm and mannerly before getting food. You should be consistent in the way you reprimand and also in the ways you cue.
     
    12-13-2008, 06:17 AM
  #15
Showing
I also have a silly question, is Blue still a stud? I agree with some parts of most above posts, I would leave a halter and lead on him until you leave the barn. A firm kick to his barrel will not injure him, it will just get his attention. Waving your arms and acting crazy when he acts out will not cause him to become afraid of you, he will see it as reprimand for his action. I use this motto at work and at home be firm, fair, and consistent. I despise animal abuse but reprimand and punishment are not abuse as long as they are fitting to the action. Sometimes, the point comes where you have to hurt them before they hurt you. You have to establish yourself as the dominant herd member. If you don't want to use a whip, I would suggest a good lead line to pop him with when he turns his butt toward you. Good luck.
     

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