My Gelding Crow Hopping, Help!!! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 09-01-2009, 01:11 PM
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No Barry, crow hopping is a term we use to describe a horse that is kinda bucking but kinda not. It is like a very mild buck. Let me see if I can find a video of it. ;)


And I absolutely HATE this video because it gives a bad name to cowboys everywhere but here is what I consider an extreme case of crowhopping. It is borderline bucking but not quite rank enough for that IMHO.

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post #12 of 24 Old 09-01-2009, 04:40 PM
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I asked the question, now I know. Thank you for the demonstrations.
I can see the hopping. It is the crow bit that confuses.

Guys, I am not, repeat not, showing my mare Delta any of those videos.
If she gets the idea that she can do that to me I am done for. SHe would have me off for sure. She has the butt of a cart horse.

But maybe, if you Guys did not allow your horses any room to move the neck then the horse could not misbehave.
My Delta gets enough rein to do the job we have in mind at the time, then once she's done it, I take the length of rein back. She gets enough rein and that's all. She's allowed to stretch down once in a while - then back up comes that head - I can tell from her ears what's she's thinking.
I even decide how long a stride she takes through the reins.

Control the head and neck, you have the horse. Where ever the head goes, the horse has to follow.

Barry G

There's more to this Western way of riding than I first thought.
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post #13 of 24 Old 09-01-2009, 07:42 PM
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I'm going to have to agree on this one as well. If he was doing this at a slower speed, I would say one-rein him and send him off again, but in this case, id he starts acting up, push him really hard, even when he's getting tired, don't let him stop for a little while.
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post #14 of 24 Old 09-02-2009, 01:39 PM
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I had an leopard appy gelding that crow-hopped when asked to canter. Come to think of it - he crow-hopped when asked to trot...when asked to walk...when asked to do anything under the saddle, at least for the first half hour or so. I was a LOT younger and dumber back then and thought it was a bit funny. I just rode on through it and he would settle down...eventually...sometimes?

I never could ride him without some initial antics and eventually sold him - after making sure that the new owner knew of his issues. He had also been "proud cut." Fortunately, the new owner wanted to use him as a teaser. Sure was a pretty horse...

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post #15 of 24 Old 09-02-2009, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by xEquestrianx View Post
I'm going to have to agree on this one as well. If he was doing this at a slower speed, I would say one-rein him and send him off again
Stopping any bucking horse rewards the behavior.
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post #16 of 24 Old 09-02-2009, 11:20 PM
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Yes, you've got to keep him moving, get his mind off of the excitement of being able to run a bit. After all, running is wonderfully exciting, who wouldn't want to jump around a bit and be merry? It doesn't sound like he's doing it to get you off, he's just got a peppy sort of personality. You can't punish him for that, can you?

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post #17 of 24 Old 09-03-2009, 06:37 AM
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Originally Posted by dashygirl View Post
It doesn't sound like he's doing it to get you off, he's just got a peppy sort of personality. You can't punish him for that, can you?
Yes you can and you should. Any time you are near a horse you are training him. Allowing him to perform an unacceptable behavior is training him that it's OK to do that - and it never is.

I'm not arguing with you, I'm just explaining why I'm right.

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post #18 of 24 Old 09-03-2009, 10:17 AM
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Whenever I've ridden a horse that bucked, I always pushed forward and more or less "ignored" the behavior. It was never worth any attention. I pushed harder and kept asking for what I wanted and more, and eventually, the horse always stopped because it never brought them anything. Negative attention can be just as rewarding as positive attention.

It does sound like your horse is hopping to let off some energy. You can try doing lots of transitions. Show him that going up in a gait is no big deal because it doesn't always mean he can go for a run. You can try walking or maybe trotting down the places you would typically run so he knows it isn't always the same thing.

And as a side note, if I ask for a canter and the horse bucks or crow hops [my friend's horse does it ALL the time] before going into the canter, I WILL bring that horse back to a trot and ask for the canter again. To canter isn't good enough, the transition has to be smooth and contain nothing but a transition. It has never rewarded the bucking behavior by getting out of work, it just means we do a million trot to canter transitions.

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post #19 of 24 Old 09-03-2009, 10:26 AM
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The best advice I can give:

The two year old I'm looking into buying as trail horse likes to buck/ crow hop when asked to gallop. It might be becuase it's a new thing, but, I do know, that if you canter him up a hill, He can't buck, or crow hop. My trainer and I are going to work on that later today. But that's what he has done with his horses. And they have stopped. He also uses John lyons methods of Round Pen Reasoning.
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post #20 of 24 Old 09-03-2009, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by iridehorses View Post
Yes you can and you should. Any time you are near a horse you are training him. Allowing him to perform an unacceptable behavior is training him that it's OK to do that - and it never is.
Oops, no, no. I didn't mean it that way. What I was trying to say is that it could just be part of his personality, like smrobs said previously. I mean, it's not like you can totally change a horse's personality with vigorous training.
I suppose my wording wasn't very good.
And like you said in your post, your horses need a good warming up before you take them out. That's part of their personality, they're spunky! Yes, proper training and reprimanding when necessary is vital, as everyone has been saying here. In no way did I mean it is OK to let him continue this behavior.

Rachel

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