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My gelding wont listen to me!

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        02-16-2013, 10:14 PM
      #31
    Yearling
    Because the horse wasn't by you, he has no respect for you! You cannot let him get away with ANYTHING!!! The horse has learned to listen to your trainer, and respect your trainer, now that she/he is not in the picture, he is testing you, and getting him way.

    The best solution would be to get your trainer to train you and him together.

    I learned that the hard way, I didn't have a trainer with filly, and still don't, she was testing me, I let her get away with things on accident (i didn't know what was right or wrong, and though my horse respected me) and now I am fixing those mistakes and my horse cannot get away with anything when I am there. She has gotten a lot better.

    Go to your trainer, get her to help you.
         
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        02-16-2013, 10:38 PM
      #32
    Green Broke
    Just wanted to squeeze one little tidbit of my opinion in here regarding getting off a horse who is acting up.

    If the horse is just being stubborn or throwing an "ordinary" tantrum, no, don't get off.

    HOWEVER, if you are in danger, there is no shame in getting off.

    I have been riding for 10 years and until last week have never had to get off a horse because of its behavior. I have always ridden them out and finished on a good note.
    But last week my horse had a mental breakdown on the trail. She was literally shaking under me- my whole body was vibrating from her trembling. She became drenched with sweat in a matter of two minutes. She was trying to bolt, doing small bucks, etc. I rode it out for about 5 minutes and was able to get her to walk on for a little bit.
    But then it escalated and she began to rear. Not little rears, but coming VERY close to flipping over on me, and nothing was making her stop. You bet your hiney I got off of her immediately.
    Of course, as soon as I was off, she bolted back to the barn.
    It set back some of our training, but oh well. I'm alive and so is she and now we have the opportunity to work on the issues that caused the meltdown.
    So, if you feel your life is in danger, do not be afraid to get off.

    Sorry for the semi-rant. I know those of you who said to always stay on didn't mean ALWAYS stay on, but I still felt the need to clarify to eliminate any confusion.
    tinyliny, nvr2many, rookie and 1 others like this.
         
        02-16-2013, 11:08 PM
      #33
    Super Moderator
    I absolutely agree that if you feel real fear, fear for your safety, get off. You will only make things worse if you try to ride through something you cannot becuase you raise the level of bad behavior that the horse knows it can dish out successfully. Do not open Pandora's box if you know ahead of time that you cannot deal with the devils that will come out.

    I am 54 and not ready to deal with a bucking horse. I will work with a hrose that might have a tendency to buck and try to circumnavigate the things that would bring out that tendency, such as canter or such. I realize that this does not necessarily fix the problem. I do what I CAN, not what needs to be done.
    That's what trainers are for. Right?

    OP, you sound like a fairly young person (mind you, anyone younger than 35 is young to me!). I can imagine this is a very challenging situation, with a lot of pressure from your trainer or others at the barn to go this way or that.
    The long and the short of it is that you ARE young, and thus less able to control your emotions. Horses are totally emotional creatures. Add your gelding's emotional outbursts to your emotional responses and you have TNT. Continueing along trying bludgeon him into respect will NOT make for a successful outcome. There is just too much that you need to learn to apply a lot of the advice given here to "get his respect". And your horse is a 'baby', really. He probably has very little training , is physically young and is a hot blood by nature.
    Why make this journey just about as hard as it can be made? STart with a calm, well trained horse who can help YOU learn. There is a LOT more to riding than staying on , applying a crop or spinning a horse when you cannot get your way.
         
        02-17-2013, 12:53 AM
      #34
    Yearling
    I am 53 and about 3 or 4 yrs. Ago I started riding my mare out by myself. Now it took us 1 1/2 hours to go 1/3 of a mile LOL I'm too old to be bucked/reared off of a horse (never had a horse buck or rear on me and I don't want to try it). It was a battle of who was going to give in first....me or Spice! I made a goal of just making it to the corner with her and I don't know who was sweating more me or her LOL She has never bucked or reared (I've had her 8yrs. Now) on me, even after getting stung by wasps on her udder....she danced but that was it. Anyhow, I got her so far and she would stop dead and wouldn't move forward, she just kept backing up......so like I said I was patient and we ended up backing 1/3 of a mile in 1 1/2 hours! But after that I never had a problem with her going out by herself!
    nvr2many and Skyseternalangel like this.
         
        02-17-2013, 02:56 AM
      #35
    Yearling
    I want to second what Rookie said. Get off if it is dangerous.

    I got a horse 2 years ago from my sister in law. She couldn't handle this gorgeous paint breeding stock mare. She couldn't bridle, saddle or ride her. I took her in August. September 13th, I was run over by a truck, my right foot, leg, and hip crushed. I was unable to walk(or ride!) for months. So I got Clinton Anderson materials and started working with the mare in the ground. I started riding months later,and I got off whenever I felt in danger. Clinton Anderson said you should dismount when it's dangerous and that you can work those issues out mounted or on the ground. The important thing is to make sure that you get off and immediately work the horse, lunging for respect with many changes of direction, and an attitude of "I will eat you right this second if you don't do as I tell you!" Move his or her feet fast and hard. Of course, you need to know how to lunge for respect and you should learn about CA's methods. But it worked for me. The idea that you must ride it through when your horse is dangerous was not true for me, but I worked hard at getting my mares respect on the ground first.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Thunderspark and CowboyBob like this.
         
        02-17-2013, 10:26 AM
      #36
    Green Broke
    Horse is too much for the OP. She needs a 14+ year old horse that has been there and done that and will respond so she can learn.

    I rescued a 3 year old QH once. Knew little about her.. was told she was broke and ridden. The first time I rode her we got about a mile and a half from the house and from a nice walk she spun and started to gallop for home. The spin was so fast I don't even recall it.. and the gallop was a real QH we are going to do a quarter mile faster than anything out there gallop.

    I stopped her and turned her away from home to continue the ride and a pitched battle ensued. She bucked, she reared, she spun and she even tried to lay down with me and I just kept asking for her to turn away from home and walk. Eventually she was lathered and tired and she started to walk away from home.. after a few nice quiet calm steps I got off. I loosened the girth and walked her home (she needed to cool out anyway).

    For three WEEKS that was the routine. About a mile and a half to two miles out... spin, try to gallop (I was ready LOL) and the pitched battle. I have never ridden a horse so evil with intent to dump me off. Every time she stopped fighting and started to walk away from home (on a loose rein.. I do have my standards) I would get off, loosen the girth and pet her up and lead her home.

    Well... a day came when we got to the usual distance (rode her all over so rarely the same place) she started the battle and suddenly just stopped and turned herself away from home and started a nice loose free swinging walk. I got off as usual.. and it was the last time I ever led her home.

    She was a clever little horse.. and very quick to learn. I had her doing figure 8's, serpentines, simple changes of lead on the figure 8 and so forth in less than three months. She was so good. Nice horse really. Sold her to a young girl for 4H.

    Turns out that before I got her the training had been conducted by a large, out of shape, young man about 16 who used an 18 inch 2X4 on her as a "crop." She learned to dump him off about a mile and a half to two miles from home and then run home w/o him. He would walk home and be so whipped by the time he got home he would take her saddle off and turn her out in the field.

    His ignorant and abusive behavior trained her to be what I had to fix.
    smguidotti and Thunderspark like this.
         
        02-17-2013, 11:12 AM
      #37
    Showing
    Home represents a lot of security to a horse and a single horse will often get so far from home then get an overwhelming desire to go home where it's safe. Some people have had good success by working the horse hard when it gets home and giving it a rest when ridden some distance away.
    franknbeans and Thunderspark like this.
         
        02-17-2013, 11:58 AM
      #38
    Trained
    Totally how I was taught to fix barn sour. They only get to rest in the place they DON'T want to go. Otherwise-work, work and more work.
    Thunderspark likes this.
         
        02-17-2013, 12:47 PM
      #39
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
    "I have had a horse or two where they did something I did not like and I got them settled and got off." Good point, thanks for clarifing. Sorry for that. You make an excellent point, There are times to take a time out. But knowing when to get off is important. But then I have never been good at taking those momments, I tend to push forward when getting off or changing has always been a stroggle for me. I am trying to learn, getting older has help alot.

    Thanks Rookie
    I agree with this too. Maybe it's because I became a horse person later in life and have never wanted fireworks under saddle for fun! I do also agree that there can be a fine line and you have to develop the knowledge to recognize it. You also have to take the emotion out of the event. I never play hero and make the horse get to the point of being in a 'red zone' by pushing too hard. Most recently, it was taking my green horse out on trails. At the end of our ranch there is a berm (a manmade hill) that surrounds it to prevent flooding. Well, we have to ride up and over it to get to the other side where the trails are. At this part of the berm, it is the corner and there is also a road at the bottom of one side of it. There are also lots of rocks and bushes on the sides of the berm. Well, my horse would not go down the other side and would just back up towards the side that went down to the road where there are big rocks and bushes. She would just get herself all tangled up going backwards, instead of simply walking down the cleared trail to the other side. In the beginning, if I really felt she was going to get us in worse trouble by backing up, I would get off and lead her down. Once we were down, I would get back up and continue on. Had to do this a few times with mud and water on the trail...nowhere else to go with bushes all around us. I did not want to push her to hard to where she would find out that she could rear up with me or buck etc. After a few times out on the trail like this, I would expect a little more from her and because she was already exposed and made it through fine with me leading her, she could offer a little more.....so my pushing her wasn't so tramatic. After a few arguements...she went, with me in the saddle. Then after a couple more times out, she doesn't even hesitate to go through. It took patience, consistency, persistence and lack of emotion.
         
        02-17-2013, 03:06 PM
      #40
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tiffanyodonnell    
    I want to second what Rookie said. Get off if it is dangerous.

    I got a horse 2 years ago from my sister in law. She couldn't handle this gorgeous paint breeding stock mare. She couldn't bridle, saddle or ride her. I took her in August. September 13th, I was run over by a truck, my right foot, leg, and hip crushed. I was unable to walk(or ride!) for months. So I got Clinton Anderson materials and started working with the mare in the ground. I started riding months later,and I got off whenever I felt in danger. Clinton Anderson said you should dismount when it's dangerous and that you can work those issues out mounted or on the ground. The important thing is to make sure that you get off and immediately work the horse, lunging for respect with many changes of direction, and an attitude of "I will eat you right this second if you don't do as I tell you!" Move his or her feet fast and hard. Of course, you need to know how to lunge for respect and you should learn about CA's methods. But it worked for me. The idea that you must ride it through when your horse is dangerous was not true for me, but I worked hard at getting my mares respect on the ground first.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I need to add that after I lunge for respect until the horse is listening and responding immediately, I get right back on and cue again. If the horse responds, we go on. If not, I get off and repeat lunging. I've only had to do this a few times with my horses.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

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