My Horse Likes To Pull And Wont Do What He's Told =[ - The Horse Forum
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 02-22-2007, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1
• Horses: 0
My Horse Likes To Pull And Wont Do What He's Told =[

He's 8 years old and he's very forward going, when you ask him to trot he won't slow down and then tries to canter and as soon as he does it's really hard to get him to walk again :/ Any Ideas on what to do? Please Help xP
Razzy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 02-22-2007, 08:16 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Barn
Posts: 980
• Horses: 0
You need to really sit hard in the saddle, you may be leaning to far forward and that is a que to the horse to speed up. You could also try one rein turning when he speeds up into a different gait that you dont want him to do.
barnrat is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 02-22-2007, 08:38 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 134
• Horses: 0
Make sure he stops fine from the walk first. I'd do lots of transitions with him from walk to trot to stop and so on. Get him sensitive to what your asking. Also remember to relax and breathe. Let him know your relaxed and he'll relax. Practice the one rein stop. Never ever rip on his mouth. make sure you are always soft with your hands. Also circles. Circle him around something. Horses that are forward don't need to go straight, they need circles and such. Make circles around the mounting block or just something that he can focus on. As soon as he starts to relax let him slow down and go straight. Good luck!
Raini is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 02-23-2007, 07:47 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 150
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnrat
You need to really sit hard in the saddle, you may be leaning to far forward and that is a que to the horse to speed up...
although the second part is true, i don't believe sitting hard/deep in the saddle will help. try and imagine 'lifting' the horse with your seat and staying light. if you sit deep he your horse can interpret that as driving him forward.

also, work with lots of circles and a lot of squeeze and release... make sure that there is a reward if he does slow down, even if it is just from a crazy trot to a semi crazy trot

good luck!
3days3ways is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 03-01-2007, 03:55 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 13
• Horses: 0
The goal here is to get your horse to respond to your rein cue, which is obviously not doing! lol

What you shoudl try and work on is to lighten him up at a stand still, then a walk. At a stand still, apply pressure to the reins to get him to back. The moment he takes a step, release the pressure. Do the same thing from a walk to a halt. The moment he stops release pressure.

You want him to understand that the moment he responds to you, he gets rewarded by removing the pressure that you are applying.
Yes, you do want to sit in your saddle, but not back. If you are sitting forward, you are applying forward "pressure" encouraging him to walk/trot faster. If you sit deeper in your saddle, you are encouraging him to slow down a bit.

Try being as light as you can on him, and increase your pressure when you get 0 results. Some horses have hard mouths and its harder for them to respond as quickly because they are so used to harsh pressure.

Hope this helps! p.s. circles and patterns are a great way to get his attention/make him think and also to cut down some of the speed.
Softtrainer is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 03-01-2007, 06:00 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeast TN
Posts: 1,146
• Horses: 0
I think 'deep seat' maybe getting confused with a half seat or braced back/driving seat. Whenever riding, a rider should also adopted a balanced and deep seat.
kristy is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 03-01-2007, 08:24 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Queensland, Australia
Posts: 628
• Horses: 3
i used to ride a horse that bolted randomly sometimes. To make it worse he had a really hard mouth from a previous owner. To stop him i would have to turn him in increasingly smaller circles until he'd stop. After a while he would stop as soon as i said 'whoa' because he didn't want to run around in circles! He still bolted on occaision but i just turned him and he stopped.

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed.
crackrider is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 03-01-2007, 08:28 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Queensland, Australia
Posts: 628
• Horses: 3
Also, what type of bit do you use? Maybe you should try a few different types of bit and see if he responds better to one.

Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed.
crackrider is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 03-01-2007, 08:48 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 55
• Horses: 0
let him run till he tires

I would let him run till he tires out.

In other words let him go as long as he wants to go and then when he stops by himself with out action from you walk him around the arena while your in the saddle. When he regains his breath start working him for just a little bit by ask him to trot. When he trots do one round around or two if you can get him too and then stop and tell him he's a good boy take him out of the arena cool him down and brush him down and put him in the stall.

Is this happening in the arena or out on the trail???????
mokinho is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 03-02-2007, 04:52 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 92
• Horses: 0
Mokinho has the right idea. If he wants to run run him till he wants to stop then run him somemore. A few times like this he will be glad to stop.
Desert Rat is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome