My horse wont stop
   

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My horse wont stop

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  • My foal wont stop
  • How to fix ex barrel horses

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    08-16-2012, 09:04 AM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation My horse wont stop

Ok, so I am having problems stoping my horse. Whenever I start to canter or trot her, it takes me FOREVER to slow her down! Like I know how to get a horse to slow, and she seems to do better, the more I sit deep in the saddle, but I really want her to stop quicker, does anybody have any tips? I would really appreciate it! Thanks so much!
     
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    08-16-2012, 09:11 AM
  #2
Yearling
Make her run until she's exhausted. I have a gelding whom was a problem horse that im retraining. I have him doing sliding stops in less than two weeks of having him because for a while I only asked him to stop when he was sure to stop well because he was showing all the signs of being tired. Trying to stop on his own, breathing hard, slowing down ect. I have an ex barrel mare and it took me running her non stop for 30 minutes until she was ready to stop well with me but in a few days her waggon was fixed.
LynnF and NikkasGurl like this.
     
    08-16-2012, 09:13 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Just some suggestions:

Start back at the walk. Don't trot her until she will stop with minimal cue and in the timeframe that you want.

THEN proceed to the trot... coming back to the walk... until you have her stopping at the walk AND the trot with minimal aid and in the timeframe you want.

Then, and only then, do you attempt to canter her. We sometimes jump to the fun cantering part too quick. Teach her at slower gaits.

Has she been properly trained?
Have YOU been properly trained?

Hire a trainer ....
smrobs, Kayty, beau159 and 1 others like this.
     
    08-16-2012, 09:23 AM
  #4
Foal
Thank you so much! This is a great idea! I will definitely try this, I did notice that she is alot more obedient when she is tired....thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasBlaze    
Make her run until she's exhausted. I have a gelding whom was a problem horse that im retraining. I have him doing sliding stops in less than two weeks of having him because for a while I only asked him to stop when he was sure to stop well because he was showing all the signs of being tired. Trying to stop on his own, breathing hard, slowing down ect. I have an ex barrel mare and it took me running her non stop for 30 minutes until she was ready to stop well with me but in a few days her waggon was fixed.
     
    08-16-2012, 09:25 AM
  #5
Foal
Thanks! That's a good idea! I will take note and try this also! She is the kind of horse that likes to run run run:) haha thanks again!!! And I am getting lessons this fall...i took lessons for 4 years, then had to stop when my trainer (my Neighbor ) Moved, but I have lessons signed up for this fall:) and she has been trained, its just that when I got her, she hadnt been ridden for a few years......
Thanks again! Very Helpful!


Quote:
Originally Posted by texasgal    
Just some suggestions:

Start back at the walk. Don't trot her until she will stop with minimal cue and in the timeframe that you want.

THEN proceed to the trot... coming back to the walk... until you have her stopping at the walk AND the trot with minimal aid and in the timeframe you want.

Then, and only then, do you attempt to canter her. We sometimes jump to the fun cantering part too quick. Teach her at slower gaits.

Has she been properly trained?
Have YOU been properly trained?

Hire a trainer ....
     
    08-16-2012, 09:26 AM
  #6
Yearling
Thats also how I had to get my barrel mare to not try to run through me all the time. It took me a year to get her to learn that calming down is alright.
     
    08-16-2012, 09:57 AM
  #7
Green Broke
I don't like to rely on the horse being tired before they will be obedient to what I am asking.

If there is one thing that I have a NO TOLERANCE policy on with my horses, is stopping. When I ask for a stop, it should happen immediately with no questions asked. Period. I don't care where we are or what we are doing, but they will stop when I ask for it. I think it's just downright dangerous if they don't.

TexasGal has perfect advice. You need to always perfect things first at the walk. When you can get a nice clean stop 100% of the time at the walk, then try it from the trot. Don't put yourself into a losing situation by asking her to trot too soon before you're ready to get a good response. And if you can't keep her at the walk only, you've got other issues to deal with too.

Also make sure you are asking correctly in the correct order.
Starting with the walk.....
Make sure you are sitting up straight and tall while she is walking.
When you are ready to stop:
1) Sit down in your saddle.
2) Put your weight into the stirrups (as if you are pushing on your stirrups in front of you)
3) Say "whoa"
4) Put light contact on the reins, evenly on both sides.
Hold until she stops softly.
The very instant she stops, you need to immediately release ALL cues.
If you don't, she'll learn to ignore you because she's not getting a reward for doing something correctly.

You've got to be consistent. If you let her "get by" with something one time, or you don't cue the same way every time, it's going to be a lot harder to get a correct response.
texasgal, smrobs, Palomine and 3 others like this.
     
    08-16-2012, 10:08 AM
  #8
Showing
It's not that horses really love to run and they instinctively preserve their energy. It's when a horse thinks this is what it should be doing that slowing it down can be difficult. Perhaps a previous owner love to go and that is what the horse now thinks it should be doing and doesn't understand why you try to slow him down. You can keep him going until he tires or something else you can try is riding about 6-8' off the rail and turnng him toward the rail. He'll stop the first time but the idea is to reverse direction so get him going. Ask him to slow and if he doesn't turn him into the rail again. Keep doing this until he begins to respond. His turnbacks will get smoother. Besides slowing him down, you are getting his hindquarters under him, and you will notice how much nicer it feels.
NikkasGurl likes this.
     
    08-16-2012, 10:28 AM
  #9
Foal
Thanks you guys!!! These are all great tips!! Im going to go take a ride and work on this problem! You guys are life savers!! Thanks:)
     
    08-16-2012, 10:42 AM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159    
I don't like to rely on the horse being tired before they will be obedient to what I am asking.

If there is one thing that I have a NO TOLERANCE policy on with my horses, is stopping. When I ask for a stop, it should happen immediately with no questions asked. Period. I don't care where we are or what we are doing, but they will stop when I ask for it. I think it's just downright dangerous if they don't.

TexasGal has perfect advice. You need to always perfect things first at the walk. When you can get a nice clean stop 100% of the time at the walk, then try it from the trot. Don't put yourself into a losing situation by asking her to trot too soon before you're ready to get a good response. And if you can't keep her at the walk only, you've got other issues to deal with too.

Also make sure you are asking correctly in the correct order.
Starting with the walk.....
Make sure you are sitting up straight and tall while she is walking.
When you are ready to stop:
1) Sit down in your saddle.
2) Put your weight into the stirrups (as if you are pushing on your stirrups in front of you)
3) Say "whoa"
4) Put light contact on the reins, evenly on both sides.
Hold until she stops softly.
The very instant she stops, you need to immediately release ALL cues.
If you don't, she'll learn to ignore you because she's not getting a reward for doing something correctly.

You've got to be consistent. If you let her "get by" with something one time, or you don't cue the same way every time, it's going to be a lot harder to get a correct response.
yeap this is how I have always done it. They are pretty quick to figure it out but I would suggest lunging the horse or free lunging in a roundpen before getting on, just to get the extra energy out so when you do get on her she is more responsive to your cues and your not just wasting time fussing with her.but the lunging etc is not to tire her out just to get her to start listening to you from the ground before getting on her.
NikkasGurl likes this.
     

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