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My horse wont stop

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  • My horse wont slow down in longlines
  • Horse not stopping from walk

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    08-16-2012, 11:22 AM
  #11
Green Broke
This is usually the result of a horse that has not been trained properly from the ground up. Fact is, my last rescue horse was like this.

The answer is NOT a stronger bit. The answer is not running the horse into the ground until stopping is a reward (that is just plain cruel). The answer lies in retraining the horse as if it were a raw 2 year old that had never seen a saddle or bridle or rider before.

Start on the ground. Use a proper lunge cavesson and side reins with saddle or surcingle. Teach the horse that forward requires thought and impulsion from behind.. and that walking has different speeds as does trotting. Transitions up and down are can be done in a impulsive, relaxed manner and that tracking up (rear end neither cramped inside or swung outside the track) is the easiest way to travel. Take your time. Lunge for 15 minutes (equal time both directions) starting with loose side reins (a little slack in the reins and a snaffle bit) at the walk.

Get a set of long lines. Long line this horse everywhere. Up hills, down hills, in circles, around corners, in figure 8's and serpentines. Walk walk walk on long lines. This helps the horse to learn to move correctly.

First ride.. after about 5-6 weeks of the above work.. in a small enclosure. Loose reins and use a leading rein.. do circles, change of direction, figure 8's, serpentines.. all this same stuff at the walk. Work into transitions.. extended walk to normal walk. Walk to stop. Stop to walk. All relaxed... and work into the other gaits the same way. No trotting for at least 2 weeks.. just walk walk walk. No trails. After the first week move to an arena. Work there. If the horse gets hot or fast, go back to the pen.

Horses that do not stop are usually not being true pigs.. they have never been taught anything about impulsion, working in a balanced manner and have been ridden front to back instead of back to front. They lack true impulsion.. the run through the bridle and are out of balance.

Horses that are true pigs about stopping are very very VERY rare. From your description, I doubt this horse is that sort. I suspect poor training.

More bit is not your answer. More training (of the right sort) is the answer.
texasgal and beau159 like this.
     
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    08-16-2012, 11:25 AM
  #12
Trained
When I am teaching one of my reiners to stop I start in the ground. If the horse can not stop and back when you say whoa then they are not ready to do so on their back. Once you get a good stop on the ground and the horse is backing right after the stop. Even if you do not stop walking you are then ready to go to the lunge line and do the same thing. You say whoa the horse should stop and back. Once they are doing that on the lunge line then you go to their back. Start at the walk. There are 3 cues to the stop and each one should be as strong at the others. When you put them all together you will get a very strong stop. However it will only be as stong as your weakest link with in those 3 cues.
     
    08-16-2012, 11:35 AM
  #13
Weanling
What I do with horses that are not that responsive in stopping is bending! Start off in a walk and then ask for a stop the way you usually stop your horse, if he is not responding, slip down on the reins just on one side, leave the other side loose and pull the horses head out to the side and then back to your thigh, so that the head is almost at a 90` degree, make sure that your hand is NOT moving anymore once you put it on your leg, it is the horses job to release!!! The horse might make some circles first but once it stops and bends the head and does not pull to straighten the head anymore - then you releases the pressure. Important, do it on both sides and wait for a lip lick especially the first couple of times. After that start walking again and ask for a stop the way you usually do, if still no response, bend again... and again... and again until the horse gets it.
NikkasGurl likes this.
     
    08-16-2012, 11:42 AM
  #14
Trained
The one rein stop does work at slower gaits but you still need to teach it on the ground first. All my horses are taught to stand still when their head is bent to the side before they are ever backed. This makes the horse safer to get on when they are green. However just like Whoa if the horse does not know the cue the horse may or may not respond as you wish. Also if the horse bolts it gives you little in the way of a safe stop. The whole idea of teaching a horse to stop in what you put into their mind not on their head or how you pull the reins. I want my horse to think that whoa means stop, stop now and back.
     
    08-16-2012, 11:49 AM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by nrhareiner    
The one rein stop does work at slower gaits but you still need to teach it on the ground first. All my horses are taught to stand still when their head is bent to the side before they are ever backed. This makes the horse safer to get on when they are green. However just like Whoa if the horse does not know the cue the horse may or may not respond as you wish. Also if the horse bolts it gives you little in the way of a safe stop. The whole idea of teaching a horse to stop in what you put into their mind not on their head or how you pull the reins. I want my horse to think that whoa means stop, stop now and back.
Well, someone asked for ideas and as this works for me and my horses I gave her an idea on how to work with the issue. Everybody uses their own methods and I am just giving some information on how it worked and works for me and the horses....
     
    08-16-2012, 11:50 AM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Island Horselover    
what I do with horses that are not that responsive in stopping is bending! Start off in a walk and then ask for a stop the way you usually stop your horse, if he is not responding, slip down on the reins just on one side, leave the other side loose and pull the horses head out to the side and then back to your thigh, so that the head is almost at a 90` degree, make sure that your hand is NOT moving anymore once you put it on your leg, it is the horses job to release!!! The horse might make some circles first but once it stops and bends the head and does not pull to straighten the head anymore - then you releases the pressure. Important, do it on both sides and wait for a lip lick especially the first couple of times. After that start walking again and ask for a stop the way you usually do, if still no response, bend again... and again... and again until the horse gets it.
This is fine if you get on a horse and "discover" the lack of brakes.. but the real answer still lies in more basic training so that the horse knows how to balance himself in order to stop. Slowing down in a balanced manner is not an easy thing for a horse w/o a rider (just plain physics.. you have an object moving in one direction that weighs 1200-1500 pounds and stopping that momentum takes substantial effort). Add to the horse a rider which may or may not know how to help the horse slow or stop in a balanced manner... and you have a LOT going on.

This is why I go on ad nauseum about transitions in training. BALANCED transitions in a gait and between gaits. A balanced horse will slow and stop and do it all smoothly. Watch a reining horse or a dressage horse or even a good show jumper. Smooth and elastic is the stop (and the start).

A proper foundation eliminates the need for neck cranking, running a horse into the ground so that the stop is a reward and so forth.

Neck cranking can result in a fall (especially if the horse really moves out) and injury (both horse and rider). I have known horses that you could run to exhaustion that would keep on running until they dropped dead rather than stop (yeah.. got a little Thoroughbred history here).

So.. take a deep breath and for the sake of the horse and your sake as a rider, take a step back. Take 6 months and really lay a solid foundation and you will learn a LOT and end up with an awesome horse.
     
    08-16-2012, 12:15 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Island Horselover    
Well, someone asked for ideas and as this works for me and my horses I gave her an idea on how to work with the issue. Everybody uses their own methods and I am just giving some information on how it worked and works for me and the horses....

I under stand that. I was giving the pit falls to this way to teaching a horse to stop. No matter what it comes down to what you do on the ground.
     
    08-16-2012, 05:44 PM
  #18
Foal
Hey, so I took your Advice, and today just worked on walking her and going through the steps, and she did really well!!! I think the problem was that the person before me used to just let her run, (she has had really good training before that person) so when I got her, she was a little rusty on stopping, so I just need to work with her on that. It will take a couple of weeks, but I think we are on the road to victory! :) thanks for you advice!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159    
I don't like to rely on the horse being tired before they will be obedient to what I am asking.

If there is one thing that I have a NO TOLERANCE policy on with my horses, is stopping. When I ask for a stop, it should happen immediately with no questions asked. Period. I don't care where we are or what we are doing, but they will stop when I ask for it. I think it's just downright dangerous if they don't.

TexasGal has perfect advice. You need to always perfect things first at the walk. When you can get a nice clean stop 100% of the time at the walk, then try it from the trot. Don't put yourself into a losing situation by asking her to trot too soon before you're ready to get a good response. And if you can't keep her at the walk only, you've got other issues to deal with too.

Also make sure you are asking correctly in the correct order.
Starting with the walk.....
Make sure you are sitting up straight and tall while she is walking.
When you are ready to stop:
1) Sit down in your saddle.
2) Put your weight into the stirrups (as if you are pushing on your stirrups in front of you)
3) Say "whoa"
4) Put light contact on the reins, evenly on both sides.
Hold until she stops softly.
The very instant she stops, you need to immediately release ALL cues.
If you don't, she'll learn to ignore you because she's not getting a reward for doing something correctly.

You've got to be consistent. If you let her "get by" with something one time, or you don't cue the same way every time, it's going to be a lot harder to get a correct response.
     
    08-16-2012, 05:46 PM
  #19
Foal
I agree that the answer is not more bit, we don't use a strong bit on her, just a normal snaffle ( I think that is what it is:) haha. But yeah, I hate bits, cause I always think about one of them going in my mouth....and I would not like that!!!! Thanks for the advice!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
This is usually the result of a horse that has not been trained properly from the ground up. Fact is, my last rescue horse was like this.

The answer is NOT a stronger bit. The answer is not running the horse into the ground until stopping is a reward (that is just plain cruel). The answer lies in retraining the horse as if it were a raw 2 year old that had never seen a saddle or bridle or rider before.

Start on the ground. Use a proper lunge cavesson and side reins with saddle or surcingle. Teach the horse that forward requires thought and impulsion from behind.. and that walking has different speeds as does trotting. Transitions up and down are can be done in a impulsive, relaxed manner and that tracking up (rear end neither cramped inside or swung outside the track) is the easiest way to travel. Take your time. Lunge for 15 minutes (equal time both directions) starting with loose side reins (a little slack in the reins and a snaffle bit) at the walk.

Get a set of long lines. Long line this horse everywhere. Up hills, down hills, in circles, around corners, in figure 8's and serpentines. Walk walk walk on long lines. This helps the horse to learn to move correctly.

First ride.. after about 5-6 weeks of the above work.. in a small enclosure. Loose reins and use a leading rein.. do circles, change of direction, figure 8's, serpentines.. all this same stuff at the walk. Work into transitions.. extended walk to normal walk. Walk to stop. Stop to walk. All relaxed... and work into the other gaits the same way. No trotting for at least 2 weeks.. just walk walk walk. No trails. After the first week move to an arena. Work there. If the horse gets hot or fast, go back to the pen.

Horses that do not stop are usually not being true pigs.. they have never been taught anything about impulsion, working in a balanced manner and have been ridden front to back instead of back to front. They lack true impulsion.. the run through the bridle and are out of balance.

Horses that are true pigs about stopping are very very VERY rare. From your description, I doubt this horse is that sort. I suspect poor training.

More bit is not your answer. More training (of the right sort) is the answer.
     
    08-16-2012, 05:47 PM
  #20
Foal
Thanks everybody!!!!!! You all have great methods!!
     

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