my horses first actual ride
 
 

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my horses first actual ride

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        09-11-2011, 12:12 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Exclamation my horses first actual ride

    Hello everyone :) was hoping you all could help me. I recently purchased a 5 year old tenn walker X quarter horse. I have been working with him every day since I've gotten him. I can saddle him and I can sit on him and it does not bother him at all. But ... I don't know what to do from here. I have a ton of horse experience (14 years) but have never trained a horse from scratch. He won't move or anything. Just stands there. I don't want to whip him or use spurs *people have told me to do that but I don't want to train him using fear* so if anyone could help me with this journey I would really apprechiate it. (I cannot afford a trainer... so any diy info would be helpful) thank you for reading this! -Elana
         
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        09-11-2011, 12:20 AM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Is their anyone else you can ride with, at least for a few rides? Then you can ask your horse to follow.

    I am raising my first horse now too, and I hope to be able to afford a trainer when the time comes, but if not, I already thought that is something I would try, to get one of my trail riding buddies to go with me and let me green horse follow a few rides. Then gradually put him in front, out to the side, etc, to get him used to leading on his own.

    Also, if you have voice commands you've taught on the ground (like say while lunging) you can try encorporating those into your saddle work. Basically, you sort of need to teach the cues from the ground so you can apply them in the saddle. That's how I understand it to be done anyway.
         
        09-11-2011, 12:23 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    There's not much that one can tell you from behind a keyboard unfortunatly. Since you cannot afford a trainer maybe getting some DVD's on horse training, or some books?

    Or maybe speaking to a trainer that is willing to barter with you, I.e you provide a service she/he pays you by training your horse.

    Or there is option number three which I doubt you will like: sell him to someone that has the $$ or experience to train him. It's possible he is too much horse for you at your current level of experience.
         
        09-11-2011, 12:26 AM
      #4
    Green Broke
    PS. Just out of curiosity, does your TWH/QH cross have
    "gait?"

    My yearling is a Fox Trotter/ QH cross and I am curious if he will be gaited. He really doesn't seem to have any gait at this point, but I am encouraged because I have been ponying him with his mother (the Fox Trotter) and she has a flat walk and for the most part he can keep up without trotting (sometimes he has to trot) but at least that is encouraging.

    The guy I bought the mare from says the foals usually take after their mothers for the most part, but I have also been told that crosses usually don't gait.

    Does your guy seem to have any additional gaits to him?
         
        09-11-2011, 12:35 AM
      #5
    Foal
    My farrier is also a very well known trainer. We talked about having him ride out and have him pony my horse with him for a few miles and come back and have me get on him and do the whole lead/follow routine. But when I asked him for a price on what he would charge me he never mentioned anything and was supposed to call me last weekend and set up a time but he never called back. I think I'm going to call him in the morning. I think that's all he needs because my sister can sit on him and I can lead him around and he's totally fine with it. I think he just needs an example. And I was concidering selling him but he has so much going for him and I'm. Really attatched to him. Lol I'm a sucker.:)
         
        09-11-2011, 12:36 AM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Katze    
    There's not much that one can tell you from behind a keyboard unfortunatly. Since you cannot afford a trainer maybe getting some DVD's on horse training, or some books?

    Or maybe speaking to a trainer that is willing to barter with you, I.e you provide a service she/he pays you by training your horse.

    Or there is option number three which I doubt you will like: sell him to someone that has the $$ or experience to train him. It's possible he is too much horse for you at your current level of experience.
    How many years of experience does one NEED to train a horse? I ask this as an honest question. I have a similar amount of experience (well, I've been riding/owning for 17 years) but have never trained a horse either. It is A LOT harder than I ever dreamed it would be, but so far I am moving along okay. My foal is just a yearling, so there is only so far I can progress right now anyway. I do hope to hire a trainer when the time comes. But I have also thought about doing it myself. It depends on how far along we are when he is riding age. Right now I still have a couple years to ponder it while I work on ground manners and ponying him out.

    But is this something that someone has to be doing for like 20+ years to accomplish? Or is someone being an owner and riding almost everyday for 10+ years give you enough experience?

    I imagine a lot has to do with the disposition of the horse.
         
        09-11-2011, 01:04 AM
      #7
    Foal
    yes

    Yes he is gaited I was told the same thing that crosses usually don't have the gait. I don't have much experience with gaited horses but his lope is gaited ... his trot is very floaty. And the farrier/horse trainer did a few loungeing circles with him and said he was definitely gaited :)
         
        09-11-2011, 05:53 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    Does your horse have a cue to go? If not, you may want to teach him from the ground. A lady that boards her horse where I do says it's beneficial for them to have a go 'button' that if you tap them in a certain area (stomach area) they'll move away from the pressure in a forward motion. If you teach him this from the ground, he should go well under saddle too.

    Whips/spurs shouldn't be introduced at his level of training. They are tools to improve a cue, not be a replacement for an effective one. Using one on him now would be like yelling at him in a language he doesn't understand. Get him to understand the cue 'go' and then if it needs refining in the future, a whip or spur might be beneficial.

    Best of luck. Keep us posted on his progress!
         
        09-11-2011, 06:15 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    When you work him, do you put him on a lunge and use voice cues for different gaits? If they know what you're asking it from the ground it's much easier in the saddle. For Whiskey's first rides, I knew she understood forward motion. As we progressed I used the right sounds for walk/jog/lope and she was able to transfer those with little difficulty, as long as I asked correctly and insisted at the right times - that's the feel that's difficult for a newbie to master... move too quick and you scare the horse and could cause a wreck - don't insist at the right time and they learn they really don't have to listen, which then also causes problems...

    I had my daughter Kellie assist (she's 18) for the first few backings... in the round pen I mounted and then asked for the walk... if nothing I waved my legs against her and had Kellie walk alongside, if nothing I just kept waving my legs harder and harder until she got irritated enough to move - then I would reward her with a good girl and a pet and sit quietly. She stopped moving, I would say "WALK" firmly, then apply pressure with my legs again - just repetition for her to figure out that no pressure was a great thing and just standing there wasn't going to get her a release from that pressure...

    That's how I start my young ones, and always get good results... good luck with your new project !
         
        09-11-2011, 07:58 AM
      #10
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    How many years of experience does one NEED to train a horse? I ask this as an honest question. I have a similar amount of experience (well, I've been riding/owning for 17 years) but have never trained a horse either. It is A LOT harder than I ever dreamed it would be, but so far I am moving along okay. My foal is just a yearling, so there is only so far I can progress right now anyway. I do hope to hire a trainer when the time comes. But I have also thought about doing it myself. It depends on how far along we are when he is riding age. Right now I still have a couple years to ponder it while I work on ground manners and ponying him out.

    But is this something that someone has to be doing for like 20+ years to accomplish? Or is someone being an owner and riding almost everyday for 10+ years give you enough experience?

    I imagine a lot has to do with the disposition of the horse.
    I personally hate it when people assign a number value to how many years you should have been riding before training a green horse. It is a total pet peeve of mine. For years I was told that I was going to "ruin" my horses because I wasn't working with a trainer. Well, since then I have trained several of my own horses and even re-trained a horse for someone else, and these horses are far from "ruined." In fact, they work much better than the horses of the "trainer" at the time.

    I think of it as kids in math class. You may have some that are ready to move on to a new concept in 1 day, some it may take 1 week, 1 month, and some may never become proficient in math. What you need to train a horse is patience, riding skill, confidence, intelligence, and good old common sense. Of course, this is for your average horse. There will always be those special cases that require more experience and skill than others. Also, you will only be able to train your horse to the extent of your skills. You won't train your horse to become a grand prix jumper if you are not a grand prix rider, but that is not to say that you can't train him to your current level within your discipline. However, horse training is not some celestial skill that is given only to a select few.

    To the OP, assuming your horse knows basic commands from the ground, I'd have a friend lead your horse as you ride. You will use your commands in the saddle in conjunction with your friend cueing the horse from the ground. Eventually, your friend will ask softer and softer, and eventually step away from the horse altogether. This should slowly condition your horse to take the aids from you instead of the handler on the ground. A safe ring with the least distractions possible would be ideal for this task.
    Annnie31 likes this.
         

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