My new horse
   

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My new horse

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        03-02-2013, 11:05 PM
      #1
    Foal
    My new horse

    I recently got a new horse. She is five years old and broke. She has a few bad habits I need to solve ASAP. When I am saddling her up, she tries her hardest to run over me and turn and avoid saddling. She has stepped on me and got my saddle filthy. (I need help to stop that. Whoah doesn't work) She also paws and paws whenever and where ever if she doesn't have hay or grass. She also throws her head (she has never bucked) its just annoying.
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        03-03-2013, 12:25 AM
      #2
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dixie Girl    
    I recently got a new horse. She is five years old and broke. She has a few bad habits I need to solve ASAP. When I am saddling her up, she tries her hardest to run over me and turn and avoid saddling. She has stepped on me and got my saddle filthy. (I need help to stop that. Whoah doesn't work) She also paws and paws whenever and where ever if she doesn't have hay or grass. She also throws her head (she has never bucked) its just annoying.
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    Welcome to horse forum!

    What I would do is work with her with a saddle pad first, not with the saddle. I wouldn't tie her up but drape the lead over your left arm and if she goes to move give her a yank on the lead (use a rope halter), does she know how to lunge, I would also drop the blanket and send her off! Have you done any ground work with her to teach her to respect your space?
         
        03-03-2013, 12:56 AM
      #3
    Trained
    Do not let her run over, there is a spot on the horse, between where the girth goes & her flank, about where the lower part of your leg would be if you were mounted, that is your "pokey spot". When she moves into you, poke her a good one in that spot, it's best to start out with the butt end of a whip, but even your finger will work. It's ok her to move away from you, but NEVER into you. Do this even when she moves into when you are brushing her, this is very good practice. This teaches a horse to never move into you, so if you are leading her and she spooks, her reaction would be to spook away from you. After you have her consistently move away from you with the poke, try saddling her. First let her sniff the pad, then put it on her, never let her move towards you, then sniff the saddle and then put that on her, same rules, no moving towards you. Hope this helps.
         
        03-03-2013, 01:08 AM
      #4
    Foal
    It might sound like a broken record, but groundwork is the first step in establishing the respect you need to have a partnership with your new equine friend.
    EmilyJoy and Thunderspark like this.
         
        03-03-2013, 09:17 AM
      #5
    Green Broke
    This horse does not sound well broke-did you buy her as a project? Is she supposed to be a trail horse? Show horse? We need some more information.
         
        03-03-2013, 10:02 AM
      #6
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cacowgirl    
    This horse does not sound well broke-did you buy her as a project? Is she supposed to be a trail horse? Show horse? We need some more information.
    I have another horse who is 22 and she is extremely broke. (She is also slow) I wanted a faster younger horse too. I ride trails but she hadn't been rode but though fields and on the road. I have road her on trail about two times and there was only one challenge, getting over a ditch, but we did it. She does lunge but doesn't seem to like it and I don't have a round pen yet. The first time I road her was just halter and lead rope. She did OK. But I'm not very finial liar with doing "ground work" and I reall am not sure how to gain respect. I do know to never give up and don't show fear. (Btw she is almost 16 hh and I am 5ft 4in and 14 years old)
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        03-03-2013, 10:08 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
    Welcome to horse forum!

    What I would do is work with her with a saddle pad first, not with the saddle. I wouldn't tie her up but drape the lead over your left arm and if she goes to move give her a yank on the lead (use a rope halter), does she know how to lunge, I would also drop the blanket and send her off! Have you done any ground work with her to teach her to respect your space?
    I am going to try this today! But I don't understand what ground work needs to cover. Also I don't know exactly how to get my respect.
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        03-03-2013, 12:13 PM
      #8
    Green Broke
    I suggest a trainer asap. Or look up parelli 7 games and start with those.
    gypsygirl likes this.
         
        03-03-2013, 01:46 PM
      #9
    Started
    Another thing you can do is make moving a lot of work. Start of with a saddle pad forget the saddle. Don't let her sniff the pad he knows what it is she's just taking advantage if you. Always put this saddle pad on her like she's your old broke pony don't assume she's going to move horses feel that. When this h
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        03-03-2013, 01:55 PM
      #10
    Started
    Another thing you can do is make moving a lot of work. Start of with a saddle pad forget the saddle. Don't let her sniff the pad he knows what it is she's just taking advantage if you. Always put this saddle pad on her like she's your old broke pony don't assume she's going to move horses feel the the anxiety of a human expectance of bad behavior When this horse moves you need to disengage her hind quarters make this mares feet move don't let her decide when she can move her feet. The one that moves their feet is the less dominant horse and right now that's you. When she goes into you move to her hind end and make that mare move around you. You may need to start off with a riding crop or a short stick. Make her make like 5 circles then stop if she stands still grab the blanket as you approach and if she takes a step go back to disengaging her. Repeat when you approach her and she stands still give her lots of praise then try to put the blanket on her if she stands still you give her lots of love and scratches and tell her how good she is. I did this a few days ago with a girl I'm giving lessons to's horse. She and her mom said she won't stand still when someone gets on her so I spun her when she moved 3 different times and she stood for me. The next time I spun her once and now when I ride her she doesn't move a muscle.
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