Nasty Pony when lunging
   

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Nasty Pony when lunging

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  • Lunging bad pony
  • Horses attacks whip and rope when lunging

 
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    11-03-2007, 10:49 PM
  #1
Foal
Nasty Pony when lunging

Hey people. I have been trying to teach my 6 year old QH how to lunge. BIG RROBLEM. Everytime I get behind him and ask him to trot or walk he turns his body towards me and lunges at me or bucks and gets pretty close to me. I am affraid he is going to seriously injur me or anyone that tries to lunge him. Today he almost nailed me right in the stomach if I would have been a few inches closer. HELP please. Tips are greatly appreciated or if you have had the same problem please let me know how you solved it.
Thanks!!!
     
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    11-04-2007, 07:30 AM
  #2
Trained
Oo sounds nasty :)

First I would say the usual and try some bonding/respects exercises with him. It sounds to me like he has little respect for you. Either that or he has had a bad experience with lunging in the past maybe. Id lean more towards a disrespect issue or he doesnt understand what you are asking him to do so he is getting frustrated and cranky with you.

How close are you getting when you get behind him?? You should pretty much always stay in the middle of the corral and have him work around you. If he isnt doing what you are asking, you are ina better position if you stay in the middle, or are you using the double lunge rope lunging thingy lol sorry, I have never used nor understand this process so im not even sure what it is called.

I don't know if you use a lunge whip or not but I use one in these cases to create "your zone". A whip held at arms length, apart from in the most extreme circumstances, should be enough to stop him in his tracks. If you hold the whip at arms length, he shouldnt want to come past it. I use my whip for many things in the corral. Everything that is except for actually using it on them. Accompany holding the whip out with a short, sharp 'sshhh' sound that indicates they have done something wrong and every time he does something right, make sure he knows it :)

On the respect subject, do you have a good relationship with him other than in the lunge situation? Does he respect you and know his place in your relationship or does he tend to get his way in most things? Establishing a relationship like this on the ground when you are not asking him to do anything is very important. When he is acting like this in the lunge ring, stop what you are doing and apply the pull and release technique using his halter/bridle. By this I mean, pull downwards on your lead rope/reins and say 'head down'. As soon as he gives and comes down, release. Keep doing this until he has his head down meaning his is relaxed and at the best point to listen to you. If he tries to carry on, return to the pull and release technique until he is completely relaxed. This may take a day or a week but its an important tool in helping your horse to relax.

To continue the bonding, when you are doing this, spend a lot of time rubbing/patting his favourite spots. Usually the eyes, ears etc spending time working on rubbing/playing with his neck at the top of the hairline is a good respect thing as well as this simulates natural interaction by 'higher' members of a herd.

Only once you have him relaxed, respectful and content, can you get him to do anything without any carry on. Persistance, patience and know how will see you through. Might I suggest maybe looking into some parelli, anderson, bell or other known natural horseman who offer an amazing range of techniques and training for dealing with these kinds of issues.

This has all helped for me and hopefully it will for you too :)

Good luck and stay safe :)
     
    11-04-2007, 08:37 AM
  #3
Showing
Good advise from Jazzy. I definetly would use a long whip. I use a buggy whip. Get him used to it by rubbing him with it first. He needs to see it as an extension of your arm/hand. I don't lunge my horses, but I do use it when teaching yielding. I use the handle part to push on whichever body part I want to move. Its a good tool to have.
You also need to stay in line with the shoulder as much as possible and out of the "kick zone"
     
    11-04-2007, 08:46 AM
  #4
Started
Is he more of a dominant type horse? Is he strong willed, etc.?

How aggressive are you with your cues when lunging? It's possible that you are being too aggressive and he is telling you that you need to back off and get softer and quieter in your body.

As stated above, you need to build the relationship, which will in turn build your leadership. Maybe you could try doing the Parelli 7 Games with him. That's all about building the relatioship, but at the same time you are establishing your dominance in your 'herd of two.'
     
    11-04-2007, 02:59 PM
  #5
Foal
Hey Guys. Thanks for the advice. I try and stay as far away from him as possible but I have to get pretty close behind him to drive him forward. And I would say I do have a pretty good relationship with him. Im just not exactly sure how to dicipline him. So sometimes he gets his own way. I am also not very agressive with my cues. I say them loud enough for him to hear me and sometimes I think he knows that im a little nervous. And I will def. Try using a lunge whip and try the Parelli games. I have heard things about them. THanks for the advice! If you have anymore feel free to tell me I would love more advice. And also check out my other posts about teeth grinding and cracked hooves! Thanks again
     
    11-04-2007, 05:59 PM
  #6
Started
If you don't know how to do the Parelli 7 Games you can always go to their website and read about it. www.parelli.com
     
    11-04-2007, 09:51 PM
  #7
Foal
Awesome thanks. I will def. Check it out. Thanks for your help and I will let you know if we have any progress!!!
     
    11-07-2007, 09:04 PM
  #8
Foal
Please be careful. Do you have a trainer to help you? You mentioned being nervous. Horses pick that up and some will take advantage of it.
One thing that comes to my mind, though, is your horse might be sore. You said you have a good relationship with him. He might be trying to tell you that he can't lunge. Just a thought, but no matter what, he can't be aggressive toward you! You might want to have a vet check him.
If he is sound and you don't have a trainer, I would definitely keep a lunge whip with you. Be ascertive. Let him know that you are the boss. If you have to get too close with the whip to get him to move, try tossing a small stone at his butt.
If he lunges toward you, don't run straight away from him. Keep your eyes on him, take up the slack in the line, run to the side, and yank as hard as you can. Get him off balance. Try to stay toward his butt and not his head. Obviously, not so close to get kicked.
Good luck, but I think you need an experienced trainer to correct his lunging issue.
     
    11-08-2007, 04:30 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by PromoteMyHorse
Please be careful. Do you have a trainer to help you? You mentioned being nervous. Horses pick that up and some will take advantage of it.
One thing that comes to my mind, though, is your horse might be sore. You said you have a good relationship with him. He might be trying to tell you that he can't lunge. Just a thought, but no matter what, he can't be aggressive toward you! You might want to have a vet check him.
If he is sound and you don't have a trainer, I would definitely keep a lunge whip with you. Be ascertive. Let him know that you are the boss. If you have to get too close with the whip to get him to move, try tossing a small stone at his butt.
If he lunges toward you, don't run straight away from him. Keep your eyes on him, take up the slack in the line, run to the side, and yank as hard as you can. Get him off balance. Try to stay toward his butt and not his head. Obviously, not so close to get kicked.
Good luck, but I think you need an experienced trainer to correct his lunging issue.
no offence but I don't think she needs a trainer at all nor a vet. If he is not exhibiting this behaviour under saddle then its unlikely its a pain issue. What has been suggested by myself and others is a more appropriate course of action. A good relationship in one area doesnt always mean it is going to carry over to other areas. Everything needs work sometimes.

While I agree that she needs to establish her position as the alpha member of the relationship, by NO means should she either throw stones at him or yank him around!!! This is not good advice at all!! If she is trying to establish a dominant position while gaining his respect, the LAST thing that should be happening is any form of action that is going to make him even more aggressive. If there is a horse out there who is going to respect this kind of behaviour ill eat my left sock.

If something is scaring a horse or making him unsure enough to carry on, he needs to be nurtured and shown that its all ok. Im sorry to say it again, but throwing stones is not the way to reinforce that there is nothing to be afraid of. If your horse bucks while you are on his back, would you whip him and punish him?? I certainly hope not. It would be wiser in that situation to find the source of the problem and work through it. The same with what is happening here. Returning to basics is a good choice.

To the OP, please don't throw stones or yank your horse :) the parelli 7 games, bonding, desensitising and returning to basics is the best way to deal with this issue. Stay safe :)
     
    11-08-2007, 09:39 AM
  #10
Foal
Jazzyrider, WOW, I think you took my post way out of context. I'm not asking her to be mean to the horse, just careful not to get hurt. I reread all of her comments and don't see anywhere where she said her horse is fine while being rode. That's why I suggested the vet check. If the horse is hurting, he wont want to lunge.

As for the stone, I never said to 'throw' a stone and 'hit' the horse. I suggested tossing a stone toward the horse's butt to get him to move instead of being so close and get kicked. She posted that she gets pretty close behind him to ask him to move and then he attacks her. She said she's afraid of getting hurt. I agree with her.

You said to me, 'if something is scaring a horse or making him unsure enough to carry on, he needs to be nurtured and shown that its all ok. Im sorry to say it again, but throwing stones is not the way to reinforce that there is nothing to be afraid of. If your horse bucks while you are on his back, would you whip him and punish him?? I certainly hope not.' WOW. I can't believe you said that to me based on what I wrote. Where did that come from? You suggested a WHIP. Wouldn't a WHIP scare a horse?

I just don't understand why you had to be so mean in your response to me. I still think someone physically needs to be there to help her. The situation seems dangerous to me. If it's not a trainer, then a experienced friend. I don't think any of us, with the little bit of information that we have, can make a definate conclusion as to how to help her. Is it a fright issue, an obedience issue, a training issue, a soreness issue, etc.? How can we know without 'seeing' the horse and his behavior?

Oh, well. I think your response to me is why so many people don't post of forums. You just never know when you are going to get someone ready to degrade you.
     

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