Neck-reining?
   

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Neck-reining?

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  • Bearing rein "neck reining"
  • Training neck reining

 
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    07-22-2008, 12:39 AM
  #1
Banned
Neck-reining?

I went to see the western show at the County Fair on Sunday and I was totally like "OMG Sonny can do that" so I want to get him that good lol .
He's good at everything, besides neck-reining. He knows the right REALLY well, but the left it's kinda annoying. He puts up a fight and doesn't want to go. I know he knows what I want him to do because there are times when he does it perfectly.
I do praise the crap out of him when he does it correct, and I've been giving a tiny sound for each direction so I can voice train him and than slowly take him off of it....which is what I did for another horse. But he's giivng me so much problems. I haven't worked on it too long, but I've tried doing it in the past also.

Would a western bit would better for neck-reining? I do have one with shanks...but I don't like to use it all the time. I'm using an Eggbutt snaffle at the moment if it matters.
     
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    07-22-2008, 12:43 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Just keep at it!

Curb bits tend to work better because they were designed to be used one handed, but there's nothing wrong with using a snaffle
     
    07-22-2008, 12:53 AM
  #3
Green Broke
What does he do exactly that causes problems? Is he stiff, is he nosing out?

Have you ruled out his 'issues' to make sure it's not pain related? Teeth, saddle fit etc. After that's rule out then work on whether it's his attitude.
     
    07-22-2008, 01:08 AM
  #4
Banned
It's just attidue....he will turn when I'll use two hands
Saddle fits fine for he won't even do it when I go bareback. No stiffness I don't believe...I do stretch him before I do any training with him.
Teeth are fine...got them checked in May and vet said they were fine and everything

I don't believe it's pain at all. His ears weren't back all the way like he was in pain

All he was doing was stickign out his nose in the air and trying to ignore my cues. I have a feeling he knew what I wanted
     
    07-22-2008, 01:13 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Then start with getting him to yield to the bit. Neck reining might be out of his element for right now. Gotta do it in steps.
     
    07-22-2008, 10:12 AM
  #6
Banned
What do you mean by yielding to the bit?
I will work a little with him every day, but not just on that because he gets bored easily lol.
     
    07-22-2008, 10:33 AM
  #7
Showing
Yielding to the bit is not critical at this point in training him to neck rein. Neck reining is simply a matter of trading one cue for another.

Start by using your seat, weight, and legs as you normally do but when you direct rein to the left also lay the right rein on his neck. Little by little you will substitute laying the rein for the direct rein. My horses will work off my legs and seat with little input from my reins - that is what you are striving for.

If your horse is getting bored then change it up but always use your outside rein against his neck when you want a turn - English or Western. That will keep him tuned up.

As for a shanked bit, that is not necessary and has no bearing on a neck rein. A shanked bit should never be direct reined but a snaffle can be used for anything. In Western Pleasure a horse has to be shown in a shanked bit. I train and trail ride with a snaffle but my horses are shown in a shanked "Billy Allen".

A horse is said to be yielding to the bit by having his face on the vertical with very light contact. If his nose is out front he is said to be above the bit and if he is tucked in then is is behind the bit. It all has to do with rein contact at first. Once he is correctly trained then very light contact is all that is necessary to bring him on the bit.
     
    07-22-2008, 11:30 AM
  #8
Green Broke
If he's nosing out yielding exercises might be very helpful to him.
     
    07-22-2008, 11:42 AM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solon
If he's nosing out yielding exercises might be very helpful to him.
You are 100% correct but the original question dealt with neck reining and I didn't want to overload her with info. (even though I kind of did).
     
    07-22-2008, 11:47 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Agreed. If he's nosing out though, it might be better to work on that, then the whole neck reining thing could be more easily accomplished.
     

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