Neck-reining
   

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Neck-reining

This is a discussion on Neck-reining within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to train ahorse to neck rein
  • Reining headset

 
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    06-04-2009, 06:02 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Neck-reining

How do you teach a horse to neck rein, I really need to teach my horse, but I don't know how. And what about a pleasure horse headset for western? Could anyone tell me how to teach those two things?
     
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    06-04-2009, 06:32 PM
  #2
Weanling
First you get your horse to move foreward. If you want your horse to move to the right you first place the left rein lightly on his neck then when there is no response use the right rein and gently tighten that rein until his nose pulls over and he moves. When he moves to the right quickly reward him by relaxing the reins. I think of it as 'asking' him first (placeing the rein on the neck) then if he does't respond I 'tell' him (pulling his nose over in the direction I want him to go).
     
    06-04-2009, 07:58 PM
  #3
Weanling
I taught my horse by (if you want to go left) pull on the left rein and lay the right rein over your horse's neck. Eventually, they get it. If you look in a catalog, their should be a headset training thing. You put it on your horse and it holds their head in a high, medium, or low headset. I don't know if you can put it on while you ride or not. Western pleasure probably needs a low headset.
     
    06-04-2009, 08:08 PM
  #4
Trained
Quote:
If you look in a catalog, their should be a headset training thing. You put it on your horse and it holds their head in a high, medium, or low headset.
PLEASE do not use gadgets to get the headset you need. A correct headset comes from impulsion, flexion, suppleness and collection. I.e. Training, time and patience.

Do you have a trainer? I have no experience with the WP headset, so can't help you there. But you should have established transitions, steering, lateral flexion, forward and impulsion, and a good stop BEFORE you start asking for a headset.
     
    06-04-2009, 08:13 PM
  #5
Foal
A good way for neck raining is from the ground for example, stand on the left of the horse, take left rain in right hand, grab rein at withers, push against the horses neck and walk in on his head, when the horse moves on step to the left release rein pressure and stand still. Repeat until horse is moving several steps to 360 without needing to walk in on him.
     
    06-04-2009, 08:32 PM
  #6
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicia    
First you get your horse to move foreward. If you want your horse to move to the right you first place the left rein lightly on his neck then when there is no response use the right rein and gently tighten that rein until his nose pulls over and he moves. When he moves to the right quickly reward him by relaxing the reins. I think of it as 'asking' him first (placeing the rein on the neck) then if he does't respond I 'tell' him (pulling his nose over in the direction I want him to go).
This is great advice. Trotting and loping lots of circles will help them learn neck reining and help with a headset too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiritJordanRivers    
If you look in a catalog, their should be a headset training thing. You put it on your horse and it holds their head in a high, medium, or low headset. I don't know if you can put it on while you ride or not. Western pleasure probably needs a low headset.
I agree with Wild_Spot. Please, please don't put any gadgets on your horse. There are very few times when those are used in the appropriate manner and it requires a very good horseman/trainer to know when that is needed. Most people have no clue how to properly use those gadgets and end up with a screwed up horse.

I personally never train for the ultra-low WP headset because I don't think it looks natural or comfortable for the horse (however, that is a whole other arguement) BACK ON TRACK: I find that lots of circles and serpentines at a trot and lope will help a horse travel with a level topline.
     
    06-04-2009, 11:13 PM
  #7
Yearling
I must admit, my version of training to neckrein is not at ALL what has been said here...but I had no guidance when I was training my first horse so I had to be creative. And it worked...so I'm going to share.

I simply crossed the reins under my horse's neck before putting them over her head to ride. Then I STRICTLY neckreined...because after crossing them, neckreining to the right both put pressure on the left side of her neck and slight pressure on the right side of the bit. Opposite for the left. The horse I was training was very calm, knew her 4 gaits, and whoa was her favorite speed...obviously I wouldn't choose this method for a high strung horse, but it worked for me and my mares and showed results within 10 or so rides. After 3 rides like this, uncross them and practise lightly...if they haven't caught on, recross them and do a couple more rides, then retest them.

As for headset, I agree with WildSpot. A headset should not be forced or "held in place". It should be taught. Unfortunately, I'm new to the headset training as well so I can't say too much on the subject, but I'm looking forward to seeing what suggestions others have.
     
    06-05-2009, 02:12 PM
  #8
Green Broke
The picture I'm getting from everybody's training ideas for a headset is the stock horse, low-to-the-ground or straight out headset. I need one that you would most likely find on a pleasure horse. The only way I can think of achieving that is to get my horse to flex at the poll, but he only does that when he wants to.
     
    06-05-2009, 02:14 PM
  #9
Green Broke
My horse got a compliment for his western lope yesterday, and I can't figure out what it was based on, I noticed that when he canters or lopes he drops his head into a nice headset, but it really only works at a canter.
     
    06-05-2009, 03:19 PM
  #10
amy
Foal
^^ a respectful horse and a relaxed one at that should slow their roll and drop their heads.

I use clinton anderson methods to help me with horses that have crazy gaits and need to slow down. I "cruise". To do that, you hold the reins in one hand and rest your hand on the horn or something so that the reins are loose. You tell them to walk. Let them walk wherever, DO NOT steer them. As long as they stay in the walk, let them do whatever. Do this for all gaits but probably not galloping. I wouldn't do it faster than a lope. If the horse slows down, ask them to speed up AFTER THEY SLOW, let them commit to their mistake. If they speed out of the gait, on rein stop them and begin again. Be patient, let them learn.

Soon after you do this a while, your horse will relax and slow their gait, lowering their head. So just put miles under the horse's feet for a relaxed headset/gait. I like to let the horse have thier natural headset, I do not try to lower in myself. However, I don't want it way high either, I just want a respectful position.

As for the neck reining question, I think the other answers are good. It just takes time, but it is definitely not a hard thing for them to learn or for you to train.
     

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