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Need Help! Anxious horse that paces in EVERY Living condition you can think of!

This is a discussion on Need Help! Anxious horse that paces in EVERY Living condition you can think of! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        05-31-2014, 05:14 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    What is horse eating, and would also consider vet doing more diagnostics too, ultrasound especially.

    There could be all sorts of things going on inside horse that would have a bearing on this, and blood work for sure ASAP would give you some insight too, as another posted.

    He also could have gotten attention that has fed this behavior through the years too.
         
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        05-31-2014, 05:35 PM
      #12
    Trained
    Hi, haven't read all replies... With regard to severe stress & stereotypic OCD's I disagree thoroughly with tying a horse up to 'get over it'.

    Minimising the stress of the horses environment, rather than adding to it, is where I'd start. Don't stable the horse, but keep him in the field with other horses, so he can be a horse. Obviously putting him with a horse that's going to be taken away, esp handled by a child is not a good choice if he becomes dangerous!
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        05-31-2014, 05:48 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Hi, haven't read all replies... With regard to severe stress & stereotypic OCD's I disagree thoroughly with tying a horse up, or hobbling(!) to 'get over it'. And the chronic severe stress will be effecting his health in many ways, not just from pacing. As much is done to manage behaviours in horses without treating the underlying problems, I'd actually look into how they handle severe stress & OCD's in humans.

    Minimising the stress of the horses environment, rather than adding to it, is where I'd start. Don't stable the horse, but keep him in the field with other horses, so he can be a horse. Obviously putting him with a horse that's going to be taken away, esp by a child is not a good choice esp if he becomes dangerous! Give him time off from his intense routine.

    Also look at his nutrition. He is bound to be very Mg deficient & maybe he's also too high in potassium, which are but 2 nutrient probs that can effect stress & behaviour. Then I'd consult the vet about sedatives or such for times you can't avoid doing something stressful with him.

    After a while, easing into it, maybe with the help of drugs initially, hopefully you can get back to working him & occasionally stalling him even.
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        05-31-2014, 06:26 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Our Clyde x arab is a pacer - not anything like as bad as she used to though. Certain things would wind her up and still can - other horses getting attention she wasn't getting mainly, an attention seeking thing - or being made to wait for thing like her feed or getting brought in/turned out
    Totally ignoring her has helped enormously - it takes patience to do that but attending to her every need to stop her pacing was rewarding her for doing it so she did it all the more
    Magnesium has seemed to settle her a lot
    She is better if turned out as much as possible but if she gets fed up of being out she'll start pacing and then jump the fence and come in so I try to get ahead of her and bring her in before she shows signs of wanting to.
    She is awful when we have the farrier or the vet here as she wants them to do her and nothing else - I have found that tying her up puts a stop to the pacing on those occasions and she stands quietly because she thinks in her head that she's about to get attention even if she's left standing for however long - I can see that this wouldn't work for all horses but it does for her
    This sort of behavior makes a horse very stressed so I'd also suggest using an antacid
         
        05-31-2014, 07:09 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    First off, get rid of the ulcers. With the stress and work he is doing, there's a 99.9% chance he has ulcers.
    After they are cured, then treat him for the prevention of ulcers all of the time.

    Change his diet to very, very low protein. Use high fat feed if necessary to maintain weight. Take all whole grains with a hull out of his diet.

    Then re-evaluate his temperament after he's free of ulcers and on the diet for a minimum of 90 days.
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        05-31-2014, 08:54 PM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    All horses are different so each one needs a different approach
    I do think a horse like this needs treating for ulcers but usually the ulcers are a symptom of the stress levels and not the cause
    My horse has never had grain or high protein feeds - she's a cob type so doesn't need them. So I'm not convinced that even assuming this horse is on a feed regime that needs changing that it would make a difference
    Plenty of turnout does help but when a horse like this one isn't used to that lifestyle it can often make them just as stressed - not every horse loves being out 24/7.
    loosie likes this.
         

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