need help on balencing up
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

need help on balencing up

This is a discussion on need help on balencing up within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-12-2009, 03:53 PM
      #1
    Foal
    need help on balencing up

    I have a youngster and was wondering if there were any ways I can help her balance up while working.

    She is fine on the left rein but when you et her on the right she is quite unbalanced

    How can I help her to balance up what type of exercises can I do in the school or out hacking?
    __________________
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-12-2009, 04:29 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Lunging on the right rein.
    Trot poles and gridwork all helps. Loads of half halts and german half halts help.
    What you can also do is spread 3 poles out in a fan shape on a circle and canter around on the circle. This helped with my thoroughbred.
    Trail riding up and down hills.
    Lots of transitions, walk to trot to walk etc.
    Does she get unbalanced in all the gaits when she is on the right rein?
    I was told to improve a horses trot you have to walk, to canter good you have to improve the trot.

    Hope That Helps!
         
        01-12-2009, 04:50 PM
      #3
    Foal
    To be honest she really only gets unbalanced when going round corners on the right rein :~
         
        01-12-2009, 06:33 PM
      #4
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LizAndCollin101    
    Loads of half halts and german half halts help.
    What is the difference between the two ?
         
        01-12-2009, 08:37 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    This is what my trainer had me do; it may not be conventional (not sure) but it sure as heck worked miracles.

    Ride DEEP into the corners. By deep I mean run your horse's nose into it until he's forced to turn or stop. Ride the outside rein, and release only when his nose is almost touching the wall. Apply some inside leg and have him bend himself around the corner. My trainer sets up cones in the corner and we HAVE to ride between the cone and the wall. I use no inside rein at all when doing this exercise; by now he bends automatically into the corners.

    Do this at the trot as well. Ride deep into the corners. Then once going well at the trot, begin doing two circles in each corner, still riding as deep as you can into your corners. First a large circle, then a small one, in the corner. Be sure to plan ahead with your circles, and it sometimes helps to imagine your inside leg tracing the circumference of the circle and your horse bending around that.

    When coming down to the trot from the canter, have him trot a very tight circle before you let him walk; this will discourage him from falling apart, hollowing his back, and getting strung out when he breaks to the trot, as in order to execute a tight circle he must collect himself up to some extent.

    Hope this helps :')
         
        01-12-2009, 10:38 PM
      #6
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    What is the difference between the two ?
    My thoughts exactly... care to explain?


    Also, running your horse into walls is only going to give him some weird corner phobia, I've seen it happen with a lot of breed shown horses (that's how they teach them to be "straight" in some barns).

    I recommend lunging the horse with proper lunging equipment over caveletti. Under saddle, keep the figures simple and don't do any shallower of a turn than a circle with a 20m diameter. Ride the horse so his shoulders point straight in front of your knees and keep your shoulders square, hands down, together and quiet. You yourself have to be in perfect balance before you can expect it from your horse.

    I also recommend finding a trainer in your area that can help you out by pointing things out from the ground and making suggestions on how to fix them. It is hard to see how a horse is traveling from the saddle. Good luck!
         
        01-12-2009, 10:43 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    My thoughts exactly... care to explain?


    Also, running your horse into walls is only going to give him some weird corner phobia, I've seen it happen with a lot of breed shown horses (that's how they teach them to be "straight" in some barns).

    I recommend lunging the horse with proper lunging equipment over caveletti. Under saddle, keep the figures simple and don't do any shallower of a turn than a circle with a 20m diameter. Ride the horse so his shoulders point straight in front of your knees and keep your shoulders square, hands down, together and quiet. You yourself have to be in perfect balance before you can expect it from your horse.

    I also recommend finding a trainer in your area that can help you out by pointing things out from the ground and making suggestions on how to fix them. It is hard to see how a horse is traveling from the saddle. Good luck!
    We don't literally run them into the wall. Like I said, cues are given to bend into the corner. My horse, my friend's TB, and every horse at that barn was trained that way and every horse there bends into the corner willingly. My horse does it with no bridle/halter/anything but my leg on him. H.ell, he does it when he's free in the arena on his own.
         
        01-12-2009, 11:09 PM
      #8
    Trained
    My horse bends into the corners willingly too, because I built up his strength, straightness and ability to bend before asking him to do a quarter 8m volte in the corner.
    There is a difference between the fast way and the way that is going to provide good basics to build upon when you need your horse to know how to properly bend, like in half pass, pirouettes, voltes and all other lateral movements.
         
        01-12-2009, 11:16 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    Lol. That is very true. And I had been doing circles and bend work with my horse for months at my old trainer before doing this with him; this trainer even said he was the most willing horse at that exercise she had ever seen. So it may have been a combination of the two.

    That said, I'm not ever going to do upper level Dressage with this particular horse, so I'm not sure it's as much of an issue with him as it would be for a horse like yours. :3
         
        01-12-2009, 11:31 PM
      #10
    Foal
    There are plenty of different methods of training, people should not put other people's training methods down just because they are different from there own, there are plenty of ways to teach so maybe some people should be a little accepting that their way is not always the only correct way.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:47 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0