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Need help catching my horse in his pasture

This is a discussion on Need help catching my horse in his pasture within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-09-2013, 07:01 AM
      #11
    Foal
    No more suggestions from me, sounds like he's got you all figured out 😉😊
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        05-09-2013, 12:28 PM
      #12
    QOS
    Green Broke
    Probably so!
         
        05-09-2013, 12:34 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Carrots? Flake of alfalfa?

    I had the same thing going last night only mine was caused by a horse who escaped from his stall got spooked when I shook some grain in his direction (yes, he is special.....) ran around to the back of the barn where in the dark he spooked himself so many more times that he had a complete meltdown and wouldn't let anyone within 10ft of him (this is the guy that normally you can't get OFF your feet).

    Grain wasn't worth it, alfalfa wasn't worth it, finally we brought over another horse (that he knows but isn't normally turned out with) and 2 people with bags of carrots and got him.
         
        05-09-2013, 02:48 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    When you go to catch him and he turns and runs away from you,. What do you do?

    A 4 acre pasture is pretty big to do this in, but what I do is if the horse turns his back to me, I make that an uncomfortable thing. I make a lot of noise, scuffle the ground , swing the lead rope into the ground, or do what ever, will startle him. Usually, he'll run forward a step or two , then turn and face the commotion. He didn't like that, but he will usually turn around and face it after the first couple of fleeing steps.
    When he turns, you stop all motion, you turn your body off to the side a few degrees, soften your whole attitude and speak softly to invite him in. If he stands there just looking , you try backing off a step, and maybe off kind of angled toward his rear, but NOT closer. You are trying to draw him.

    If he looks at you, then decides to leave, you allow him to make that decision (don't make a big noise until he has actually turned away) and make that an uncomfortable choice. You hope he'll do the same thing.

    IF he runs away, you follow (I know, you can't right now. So this is your plan for when you CAN), and if he gets far enough away that he tries to start grazing again, you interrupt that. I have thrown a rock or a stick to do this. I dont' hit him but I make it land near enough to him to make him put his head up. When he does, I stop approaching, hoping he'll turn and look at me.

    So basically, you make the choice to move away from you uncomforatable (try to never allow him to graze or rest too much) and every time he looks toward you, you offer total calmness. Eventually, and hopefully, he'll choose YOU instead and come over. When he does, don't put anything on him at first. He chose to come, so he shoudl chose to stay. If he rechoooses to leave, you restart the whole process.
         
        05-09-2013, 07:00 PM
      #15
    QOS
    Green Broke
    Thanks TinyLiny. It is the oddest thing. I went to see them for the first time in 3 weeks Saturday. He was letting me pet him and love on him. Hubby picked up his back feet. I could have haltered him with no problem. He did hurt his head and I know this will pass and I will be able to halter him.

    My concern is when I go to catch him and have the trailer!!! He is one sharp cookie and he used to just walk to the other side of the pasture and that was it. I would catch him and go. This run circles around Denise is a new thing because this horse is normally super well behaved and wants your attention.

    I will try your suggestions....I went out around 11:30 AM and was petting him with no problem til I tried to halter him. He backed up and turned around and walked off. I followed him and kept him moving for about 10 minutes mostly because it was my time to walk! I am supposed to walk a certain amount of time each day. I had planned on walking Biscuit up and down the ranch road because I can balance myself on him if necessary (he really came in handy the last 6 months for that!). I hugged up my hubby's horse Sarge and smelled in his horsey smell...hahahahaha I may have to take Sarge if Biscuit is going to be a patootie!
         
        05-09-2013, 09:38 PM
      #16
    Showing
    If he backs up and walks off again, wait until he stops then walk to his spot but shoo him off (out of kick zone) and stand on his spot. Dominant horses do this, just decide to claim another's grazing spot. But, first you need to watch his ears. If he's facing you yet flicking them back he's telling you his plans. You might back up a step or two to draw his attention back to you. If he turns his head to his right, turn your head and shoulders (feet don't move) to your right. This too often draws them back. Now should he turn to his right and walk off, immediately turn to your right and walk off. No hesitation as you want him to think it was your idea not his. You don't have to walk far, 4 or 5 steps. Stop and see where he went. I'd be surprised if he went very far as they often stop once the pressure is off. If you are up to it circle around behind him and move him again. You want him to the point where circling behind is impossible as he'll keep turning his hiney away from you and watch you like a hawk. That's what you want.
         
        05-10-2013, 12:28 AM
      #17
    QOS
    Green Broke
    Thanks Saddlebag. I will give that a try too. He is not the dominant horse in the pasture. My husband's horse Sarge is. Sarge elevated himself to Sargent Major while I was convalescing and was very bossy with Biscuit. Biscuit will take 2 steps back with just a flick of an ear from Sarge. He will stand back as 2nd horse on the totem pole should.

    I should have time to work with him Monday but I will be going out there everyday to check on them. Not seeing them for 3 weeks was not a lot of fun for me. I missed them terribly!
         
        05-12-2013, 01:10 PM
      #18
    QOS
    Green Broke
    update on the Biscuit's evading

    I went to see Biscuit Friday evening. Lots of rain the night before so I didn't get in the pasture. He was ok with even touching his bobo. My hands were all over his face and head. I was sure I could have put his halter on.

    On Saturday my cousin came in from the Cayman Islands. She has a stables there and does horse therapy for people there. Anywhoo. She was going to ride Biscuit.

    He came running in when he saw us drive up. Friendly as he could be but walked off when he saw hubby with halter. He took off when they came closer and was running around the pasture, tail flagging and snorting. He fell down and slide on his side (I nearly had a heart attack - I don't need vet bills or broken legs) but he got up and ran some more. They kept him moving for about 10 minutes and he turned and stopped and hubby haltered him with no problem. He was an angel under saddle and ponied a 3 year old child for her first ride.

    Now I just have to get him to stop running circles around me when he sees the Brenderup. As I said this was a new thing and it may just be too much spring energy. I am going to work on ground work that yall suggested. Thanks for the help and if anyone else has a suggestion please post it! I need all the help I can get!
         
        05-12-2013, 07:26 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Bo does that often, I have a paddock I feed them in so on ride or farrier days I just shut the paddock door.
    But the answer is to teach your horse to come. You have to do that in an area where he can't get away. IE the round pen. I teach mine to go the direction I point, and to stop and face me when I drop my arms and say whoaaaaaaa, I then make an exagerated come here motion with my hand. And use verbal, "Come Here" COme here, Now I start this with a lunge line attached and can istantly reinforce , like when they are going in a circle and I drop my arm and say whooooo ho ho ho easy easy, they get a few more steps and a tension on the line before I snatch the snot out of them. The learn quick to stop and face me, when I drop my arms. Then the come here, basically pulling the line lightly with exagerated hand movements, Then shake the rope to back up. Then back to go left, go right stop come here back up. When they have that down disconect the line and do it hand signals only. Practice that a few times. Now how this carries over to the field. When he turns to run to the side raise your arm and point the direction he is going and give him your verbal move out commands. Basically like it was your idea for him to trot to the side. Let him go a bit then drop your arms give him the whoa command and stand still, he should face you , then give him the come here command, hopefully he will come, if not aproach him slowly while still giving the come here command. If he turns to move off as soon as he isnt facing you raise your arm in the direction he is going and give the move out command. Maybe shake the lead line or whatever you have to do to get him moving, then drop arm, repeat. Obviously working on this in the round pen when you don't have to chase him across the south 40 is much prefered.

    Does that make any sense at all,,, humm probably not I need to shoot a video
         

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