need help for a friend- disrespectful colt
 
 

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need help for a friend- disrespectful colt

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  • Disrespectful colt
  • Why would a colt disrespect

 
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    06-25-2010, 02:27 PM
  #1
Yearling
need help for a friend- disrespectful colt

Ok first off this is NOT my colt. This colt belongs to a good friend of mine who does not have internet access, who asked me to ask for advice on her behalf.

She has a coming 2 year old AQHA gelding colt. He was not handled much before she got him, and she has worked hard on him. He is now halterbroke and will stick his own head in the halter. She can pick up his feet and he's been trimmed.

The problem she is running across is that if her colt doesn't want to do something, he will rear up and prance around. He will show the whites of his eyes and kind of freak out. She was run over by him this morning and he cut her leg up pretty bad with his hoof. He had gotten out of the fence and she put a lead on him and was leading him back, and he spun around hard, reared and came down on her with his front feet. She is not afraid of him, she is angry at herself that she cannot control his movement like she should. I have seen him become pushy with her and she will push him back and say "NO" very loud, which just makes him act worse.

I am worried that she is going to get hurt worse if this continues. She does not have a round pen, and her finances are pretty tight due to her hours being cut at work, so no money for a trainer. I'm not a trainer, but I'm trying to use what I know to help her. Frankly his behavior is worrisome to me.

Can anyone offer some suggestions (besides sell the colt, she won't do that!) He is a well bred colt, and she hopes to someday use him for trail classes. I am sure once she gets over these issues he'll be fine, he is a nice looking colt.
     
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    06-25-2010, 02:30 PM
  #2
Lis
Yearling
Has he been gelded? Might settle him down somewhat.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:33 PM
  #3
Yearling
Yep he was gelded as a month old colt.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:34 PM
  #4
Foal
The last stud colt that I worked with did the same. When asked to do something that he didnt want to he would rear and often lunge towards me or try to knock me over with his shoulder. I invested in what they call a good boy chain. It stopped the behaviour immediately. The first time that he reared with it on, I snapped down on his nose and he stood there looking at me bewildered. I didn't hurt him, but definitely got his attention. He was quickly advancing on all of his training after that. Rearing is dangerous and should not be taken lightly as you expressed. Good luck : )
     
    06-25-2010, 02:40 PM
  #5
Yearling
Thanks Tina. I did suggest a chain lead over the nose, I am not sure she has one but I do, and I can drive it over to her today.

One thing I did see him do was when she was leading him, he would fling his head up and down kind of like trying to gain momentum to rear, but never get his feet off the ground. He never seems relaxed and doesn't drop his head at all when being handled.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:44 PM
  #6
Banned
A stud chain will help with the uncontrollable-ness. Also, a good tap on the nose might not hurt. Not hard, but enough to say "THAT is NOT acceptable."

Also, if he just plain doesn't respect people, when he does something naughty a good smack on his shoulder, hindquarters, chest, and maybe even his tummy (be careful witht hat last one) could help him gain respect. You may even want to carry a crop around for a while, but use it sparingly. I used to ride a very disrespectful pony, and after a few rides with smacks from my hand or the crop, he was the most perfect little pony ever, not because he was afraid of me, but because he respected me.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:48 PM
  #7
Banned
How about bridling him instead of a lead? I understand that he isn't broke to ride but a bit might change his mind. While Im not so big on stud chains...im also not really all that into seeing people getting trampled. If gentle persuasion doesnt work, she might have to get a little tough with him. If she could teach him to lunge, that might help. Every time he got his feet stuck and reared, make him circle out.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:49 PM
  #8
Yearling
I believe she has popped him in the neck when he was getting high handed, and he just reared more- he just doesn't seem to have any fear of people.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:52 PM
  #9
Foal
I would also encourage her to use a rope halter. He may not relax because he is young and full of piss and vinegar. I would teach him some patience by tieing him up for a good couple of hours to work his own issues out. If she has something solid to tie to that he can't break away. Have her sit close by to monitor his safety. Have a good day : ) Also teaching him to lunge soon would be good so that she can burn off some of his energy.
     
    06-25-2010, 02:52 PM
  #10
Yearling
Corino, that is one suggestion I had- was to start lunging him. I offered my surcingle to start ground driving too, but I think she is worried that if she can't control him in hand on just a lead, that she'll have less control on a long line.
     

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